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The End of the Line


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Product Details

  • Actors: Ted Danson
  • Directors: Rupert Murray
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Color, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Docurama
  • DVD Release Date: February 23, 2010
  • Run Time: 85 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B002RB56W2
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,747 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The End of the Line" on IMDb

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Humans have long regarded the world's oceans as vast and inexhaustible. Now, we have learned otherwise.

Based on the critically acclaimed book by Charles Clover, THE END OF THE LINE charts the devastating ecological impact of overfishing by interweaving both local and global stories of sharply declining fish populations, including the imminent extinction of the bluefin tuna, and illuminates how our modern fishing capacities far outstrip the survival abilities of any ocean species. Scientists explain how this depletion has slipped under the public radar and outline the catastrophic future that awaits us an ocean without fish by 2048 if we do not adjust our fishing and consumption practices.

An alarming call to action that is already changing the world, the film narrates an escalating global crisis that can only be avoided by recovering and sustaining the incredible vitality of the sea. Beyond detailing the issues at hand, THE END OF THE LINE outlines the solutions, motivating supermarkets, restaurants and individuals to take the necessary steps to save the ocean. Now you can join them.

DVD Features: Ocean-Friendly Seafood Guide: A wallet-sized insert you can use to make choices for healthy oceans; Six webisodes: Over 50 minutes of featurettes take you behind the scenes and deeper into the issues; Ted Danson on THE END OF THE LINE; The Coral Triangle: Nursery of the Seas; Trailer; Filmmaker Biography

Amazon.com

The End of the Line is a gripping, sobering documentary for anyone who loves fish, the ocean--and the health of the earth's entire ecosystem. British filmmaker Rupert Murray has created a must-see film--a true call to action--that compellingly makes the case that the earth's oceans must be preserved, like great areas of the land, for future generations, to prevent the emptying of the seas of fish. Murray examines modern fishing practices, and the lack of agreement in the global community on what's acceptable. Trawling, for example, still the major form of catching mass quantities of fish, is done many times a year in the same spot--a practice, Murray tells the viewer, akin to "plowing a field seven times a year." The yield is, and will be, ever diminishing.

Murray based his documentary on Charles Clover's book The End of the Line: How Overfishing Is Changing the World and What We Eat. As a film, however, the message has far more impact--the gorgeous undersea photography is riveting and inspiring--and helps leaven the downbeat overall message of The End of the Line. Ted Danson is an engaging narrator, not mincing words or glossing over harsh realities about the world's diminishing fish supply--yet drawing in the viewer to the wonders of the ocean, and why they need the same protections that vast areas of land preserves enjoy.

The End of the Line
will make viewers think twice about the fish they eat--and maybe spur them into ocean conservation activism. The DVD includes several extras, including a great mini documentary about "the Coral Triangle," a lush area of the sea north of Australia and surrounding the Philippines and parts of Indonesia. There are also an interview with Danson, a biography of Murray, and a very helpful small print guide, to be taken to restaurants and supermarkets, that suggests the most and least environmentally sustainable types of seafood. --A.T. Hurley

Customer Reviews

Depressing is right.
R S Cobblestone
Better to eat the small fish ourselves.
shantonah
This is a very informative documentary.
Happy Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

49 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Daiho VINE VOICE on March 21, 2010
Format: DVD
It's ironic that within a couple of weeks of this film being released to DVD, the world's leaders decided to do nothing to protect Bluefin tuna. Delegates to the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora succumbed to lobbying from Japan, a nation that in devouring 4/5 of the world's Bluefin creates a lucrative and addictive market for developing nations to provide fish flesh for Japanese consumers.

The End of the Line is not a film specifically about Bluefin, but about modern fishing and the decline of sea stocks. This is no Cove. There is no late night skulking, no high tech gadgetry, no villainous fishermen, no tension, no pathos. It's more like Food, Inc. for the seafood industry, a rather conservatively shot documentary with some lovely ocean photography, a few graphs showing depressing and repetitive declines in populations of some of the world's more commonly consumed fish, and lots of talking heads, most notably The Daily Telegraph's environmental reporter Charles Clover, Professor Jeffrey Hutchings (Dalhousie University), Dr Boris Worm (Dalhousie University), Professor Daniel Pauly (University of British Columbia) and Prof Yvonne Sadovy (University of Hong Kong). There's a sequence with a former Bluefin fisherman that looks like it might offer a taste of drama. His life is now one of loitering in hotel rooms near wharves photographing fishing ships or following them about on the oceans hoping to document how some countries get around fishing quotas.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By shantonah on March 13, 2010
Format: DVD
This is a great documentary and every person should see it. Fish stocks in the ocean are at dangerously low levels, with many species very close to extinction. This film tells you exactly what has happened, how come we didn't know about this before and what we need to do about it, quickly. The solution is a simple one and they have 3 suggestions. One involves being conscious about your choice of fish, how to eat sustainable fish stocks. For example eating farmed fish is not such a good idea because they are not produced sustainably, it takes 5kg of little fish to produce 1kg of salmon. Better to eat the small fish ourselves. In any case the larger fish are at such dangerously low levels they may never recover. Many governments are not monitoring or policing their fishing industries properly and the Japanese are raping the ocean and freezing what bluefin tuna are left so they can get more money for them later, when the supply dries up which will be soon. Asian supermarkets are absolutely nuts. Live fish crowded in tanks everywhere, if people don't buy them they just die. So its very selfish to eat sashimi now, or tuna. Or order endangered species from the menu of posh restaurants. If you want to know which fish are sustainable and preferable to eat go to (...) or (...). The ocean belongs to all of is but a few big greedies, as usual, are exploiting it and making billions, leaving us with nothing for the future. The whole balance in the ocean is being compromised by this. Stop eating the wrong fish. See the film and join the campaign.

Another good film about turtles is "Chances of the World Changing".
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Guy Denutte on May 9, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
There was so much cod in Canada it was said you could walk on its back. Overfishing led to its extinction. More than 40.000 fishermen lost their jobs. Despite the moratorium imposed in 1992 the cod isn't coming back. Extinguishing a species is an *irreversible process*.

In general, the global sea catch peaked in 1988. Industrial fishing methods will produce the collapse of all fisheries by 2048, following scientists interviewed in this documentary.

Apart from the extinction of the cod in Canada, other examples of the signs on the wall will be shown. If you also want to see how those huge amounts of tuna are caught, 150 tons of them each time the nets are hauled, check it out on the DVD Wild Pacific. The tuna in the Atlantic is nearly extinct and the fishing fleets are now driving tuna to extinction in the Pacific.

We are definitively living the age of stupid (Age of Stupid (2pc)). Fishermen are aware of the dwindling fish populations, but won't accept their guilt. Fishermen all over the world blame *other species* for the collapse of the fisheries. Each year, Japan kills 1.000 whales (Whale Wars: Season 2) and 23.000 dolphins (The Cove), blaming *them* for eating the fish. Canada still massacres seals (see it for yourself :
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