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The End of Men: And the Rise of Women Kindle Edition

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Length: 336 pages
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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This debut by Atlantic magazine senior editor Rosin bears witness to a paradigm shift currently turning the gender norms of American society upside down. "Plastic women," adaptable in a changing economy and culture,, dominate institutions of higher education and steadily infiltrate the cubicles and boardrooms of a corporate America, and no longer need men to be the breadwinners. . . "Cardboard men," especially working-class and unskilled men, forced out of their factory jobs by the growing industrial flight, struggle to find purpose and employment in an evolving economy that values brains over brawn and the ability to build teams over handiness with a hammer . Rosin explores these changing gender norms across several settings, from the bedroom to the jail cell (more women are being arrested for violent crime than in the past), and teases out the highs and lows experienced by women attempting to shoulder the breadwinner and housekeeper roles simultaneously. Rosin's passion for the subject is married with the depth of understanding gained from years of reporting to produce confident prose and thorough citation. She deftly balances academic research with relatable anecdotes, from sorority sisters to single mothers. Rosin ends with a vision of both genders putting aside outdated traditions and finding a new normal built on the strength of human connection.


Praise for "The End of Men""[Rosin] covers an impressive amount of ground about women...A great starting point for readers interested in exploring the intersecting issues of gender, family and employment." - "Kirkus " "In this bold and inspired dispatch, Rosin upends the common platitudes of contemporary sexual politics with a deeply reported meditation from the unexpected frontiers of our rapidly changing culture." --Katie Roiphe, author of "The Morning After" and "Uncommon Arrangements"""The End of Men" describes a new paradigm that can, finally, take us beyond 'winners' and 'losers' in an endless 'gender war.' What a relief! Ultimately, Rosin's vision is both hope-filled and creative, allowing both sexes to become far more authentic: as workers, partners, parents...and people."--Peggy Orenstein, author of "Cinderella Ate My Daughter" and "Schoolgirls"Praise for Hanna Rosin's "God's Harvard " ""God's Harvard: A Christian College on a Mission to Save America", is a rare accomplishment for many reasons - perhaps most of all because Rosin is a journalist who not only reports but also observes deeply." ---"San Francisco Chronicle " "A superb work of extended reportage." -- "Chicago Sun-Times " "Nuanced and highly readable." -- "The Washington Post "

Product Details

  • File Size: 797 KB
  • Print Length: 336 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Books; Reprint edition (September 11, 2012)
  • Publication Date: September 11, 2012
  • Sold by: Penguin Group (USA) LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0085DOX48
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #184,967 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

207 of 216 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Finn on September 17, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The End of Men boils down to a handful of really significant statistics. Young women hold a 3 to 2 advantage in bachelor's degrees, are outearning men in their twenties, and are beginning to crowd men out of nearly all the major professions. Exactly what this might portend is appropriate to an Atlantic magazine article, which served as the basis for this book, but does not suffice in Rosin's hands to make a thoroughly engaging book. Instead, she creates a dichotomous narrative structure emphasizing Plastic Woman, who is flexible and adaptable to the new economy, and Cardboard Man who manifestly is neither. The examples and interview subjects that she selects never stray outside this arc. The men are universally either sniveling Greenberg-like characters, when not represented as merely stupid and lazy, while the women are described in the most gushing diction as literally, "Katniss-like." The book is riven with pop culture and literary references apparently meant to support the thesis, but Rosin makes only the most half-hearted attempt to get behind what accounts for this role reversal. She simply appears to believe women are by nature innately suited to the service economy, while troglodytic men are not. Furthermore, despite taking a few jabs at class inequality, she positively swoons over the rich and powerful. Her portrayal of most working class people, male and female, smacks of smug condescencion.

Her forecasting models for what this dangerous economic imbalance might entail do not seem in any way systematic. Rather, they are derived from anecdotes, which of course she selects. She claims to be apoltical, merely a faithful chronicler of the "the world as it is," producing a work to transcend the gender wars, a conceit into which many reviewers seem have invested.
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541 of 598 people found the following review helpful By Tyro on September 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
The theme of male obsolescence is tiresome, to say the least. It also has a curious quality of seeming fresh no matter how many times, and in how many ways, it is repeated. I remember back in 1999 seeing a "forum" in Harpers called "Who Needs Men?" At the time I thought, Wow - they're still recycling that same article? Almost 15 years later, the same idea is repeated with each month's salvo of junk-nonfiction - and no sign of slowing down.

Some reviewers will no doubt complain that you can't talk this way about women. They're right, but no one cares about the double standard. Similarly, a few will be offended by her snide tone on the subject of men. What, were they born yesterday - it's just the normal tone everyone takes. It's not "misandry" that makes this book bad. It's not the perky, informal writing style. I wasn't expecting her to write like Orwell or Roth. It's bad because the writer doesn't know much about this or any other subject.

To be fair, or fairer, I did learn two things from this book. Firstly, readers love to hear their group praised and never tire of such praise. Secondly, when women are perceived to be failing, people blame it on environmental factors or prejudice. When men come up short, it is blamed on men's inherent shortcomings. Why are there so few female chess grandmasters? Well, little girls aren't encouraged to play chess. Why are there so few men in PR? Well, women have better communication skills. See? It makes perfect sense.

But I can't say the same about this book. Rosin bases most of her theory on the recession. It is a "man-cession" due to men's inherent inability to adapt. (By the way, the story of the human race is one of adaptation, is it not? Economic and otherwise.
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163 of 181 people found the following review helpful By Indy Reviewer VINE VOICE on September 9, 2012
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Hanna Rosin's "The End of Men" is an interesting but not fully satisfying look at the economic progress of women, the relative economic decline of men, and the societal effects of both. While the book treats the first two subjects quite thoughtfully, Rosin doesn't do as well when she explores the broader implications of this shift. A troubling and repeated tendency towards sample bias weakens many of her arguments, and even the author admits that her initial thesis probably isn't correct. Still, it's an interesting read, but not nearly the landmark work that has been suggested in some quarters. 3 stars.

Despite the claims of the well-oiled marketing push behind the book, many of the topics here aren't novel. Goldberg's The Hazards of Being Male was among the first to notice a relative decline for men back in the 1970s, Faludi's Stiffed was referenced by Rosin as motivation for her Atlantic article of the same title (although oddly, that controversial reference nearly disappears in the book), and Save the Males and Manning Up have been more recent, albeit openly polemic, entries. On the economic rise of women, the far-less hyped
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