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The End of the Peace Process: Oslo and After Paperback – May 8, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 411 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Vintage Books ed edition (May 8, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0375725741
  • ISBN-13: 978-0375725746
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.8 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,929,961 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In his 18th book, Palestinian writer and Columbia University literary scholar Said (author of the highly praised memoir Out of Place) once again brings acute insight to a controversial subject. In 50 essays (most of which were originally published in the Cairo Ahram Weekly and London's al-Hayat), he offers a bleak and somewhat cynical view of the Middle East peace process since Oslo. Deeply concerned with the fate of the Palestinian people, and without mincing words, Said probes their relationship to the Israeli government and their lives under Arafat's Palestinian Authority. He skewers the Oslo Agreements--arguing that Palestinians merely surrendered to the Israelis--as well as the Palestinian Authority and Arafat. (Peace, he points out, can only exist if equality and respect exist; as a result, he urges Palestinians to resist Israeli settlements with nonviolent demonstrations and to create stable, democratic institutions that can coexist peaceably with Israel.) Throughout, Said also comments on the role of intellectuals in political discourse, the Holocaust and, in a particularly poignant essay, the political development of his son, Wadie. Although they're stimulating, because these essays originated as newspaper columns, they're also occasionally repetitive, and some of the events that inspired them have receded into oblivion. Still, on the whole, this is a potent analysis--one that refuses to follow a party line--of the complexities and stark realities of Middle Eastern politics. (Apr.)
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The Oslo "peace process," which resulted in the signing of an agreement between Israel and Palestinian leader Yassir Arafat, has been the subject of numerous books, articles, and commentaries. In this refreshing and intelligently argued book, Palestinian American Said (English and comparative literature, Columbia Univ.; Orientalism; Culture and Imperialism) provides a sobering analysis of the pitfalls of the Oslo agreement. Most of the essays in this collection have appeared in Cairo's al-Ahram Weekly and al-Hayat, London's Arabic-language daily. Each essay is Said's reflection on a dimension of the Palestinian predicament. Said convincingly explains why the "peace process" has had damaging effects on the fabric of Palestinian society and polity. (It puts nothing in writing, for instance, about the further expansion of Israeli settlements.) He is as critical of the corruption, incompetence, and authoritarianism of the Palestinian Authority as he is of American and Israeli postures. In his vintage style, Said forces the reader to look beyond clich s, sound bites, myths, and conventional thinking about the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Highly recommended for public and academic libraries.DNader Entessar, Spring Hill Coll., Mobile, AL
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Said's collection of essays are very well written and to a great extent I think explain the current deadlock in the middle east.
A. Prabhu
He offers many approaches and means of how this (hopeless ) peace can be revived to the ultimate benifit of the Israeli as well as the Palestinian peoples.
Mustafa
I do not know how to say how much I liked the book,, but this is one of the rarest book I couldn't stop reading,,,enough to bother my studying..
polaris11

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Chris on November 18, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Edward Said opposes the "peace process" because it has been deliberately designed to confine Palestinians to cantons which are isolated from one another, over which Israel controls overall sovereignty, water , exits and entrances, overall security and so on. The "peace process" has allowed Israel to extend its military occupation of the West Bank and Gaza strip, with arrangements lest costly than the old direct military rule, letting the Palestinian Authority have "limited autonomy" in Palestinian population centers, the cantons, while it retains all the best land and continues expropriating Palestinian land and building more settlements, most fervently under the "moderate" Labor governments, contrary to much illusion. Israel currently retains direct rule in about seventy two percent of the West Bank and about fourty percent of the Gaza Strip. Said makes very clear that he believes the "peace process" to be similar to the effort in apartheid South Africa to establish batustans,"homelands" for the blacks. Doubtless, he says, the Palestinian cantons will one day be declared a "Palestinian state" but it will actually be no more than a caricature of the bantustans of South Africa.
He was on close terms with Arafat and many of the top PLO leaders before 1993. He offers an utterly scathing critique of Arafat and the PLO leadership. He portrays them as unbelievable morons and unbelievably corrupt and brutal. He says the main reason the PLO succumbed to Israel's offer in 1993 was that Arafat and his goons were facing an internal rebellion within the PLO because of their corruption, stupidity and lack of democracy. So they jumped at an agreement that made them Israel's collaborator and gave them protection.
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80 of 92 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 21, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Some critics have chosen to question what Edward Said means by 'real peace' and claim that, in truth, he seeks the destruction of Israel. No one who reads this book can be left in any doubt as to what he believes are the conditions necessary for a just and lasting peace.
For decades Edward Said has been a powerful advocate of a two-state solution, preserving the state of Israel within its pre 1967 borders. In this book he again and again condemns those who continue to argue for the elimination of the state of Israel and urges his fellow Arabs to accept the reality of the Jewish state. Indeed, he even goes as far as to brand those who refuse to have any dialogue with Israelis as racist. Anyone who was under the slightest illusion that Said is in any way making a case that even approximates to the destruction of Israel can be left in no doubt by the articles republished in his latest book.
Said argues very powerfully that the Israelis must recognise the wrong that has been done to the Palestinians, and that those who have been forced from their homes at gunpoint, dispossessed, their houses seized or bulldozed should either be permitted to return to their homes or should be compensated (not that all should have an automatic right or return). The Jews have been very vociferous in their campaign to see compensation paid to Jews for losses and suffering inflicted by the Nazis. Why then should they refuse to compensate those who have been dispossessed by Israel, the victims' victims, the Palestinians whose only crime was to live in Palestine?
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27 of 35 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
This is a magnificent collection of essays that Edward Said originally published in newspapers and magazines like al-Ahram and al-Hayat. All of the essays are eloquently written and powerfully argued to expose the injustices of the so-called peace process. Too few intellectuals (unfortunately) have the moral courage and insight of Edward Said.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Zeeshan Hasan on May 11, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book starts where Said's "Peace and its Discontents" ends, so read that book first. It's indeed a gloomy picture. Arafat's puppet administration sinks deep into corruption whilst steaming in impotent helplessness, as the so-called peace process becomes a transparent tactic to block all real Palestinian aspirations for a viable state in the occupied territories. The Israelis and the US continue to block all real statehood negotiations until 'violence stops', overlooking the crucial fact that Palestinian violence is largely a reaction to the brutal Israeli occupation, and is impossible for Arafat to control while the Israeli settlement and occupation policy continues. So things remain in a deadlock. And meanwhile Said's health deteriorates. Sad indeed, but unfortunately it's the truth of the situation.
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25 of 33 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 5, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Edward Said, renowned scholar of the modern Middle East, is at it again, exposing the truth of the current situation in Israel/Palestine. Read this book if you would like an honest antidote to the ridiculous half-truths and prevaricating poison that is the American media establishment.
Said incisively dissects the true nature of the Oslo so-called "peace process". His exhaustive research, expertise in the field, eloquence, and intellectual rigour will impress and convince you.
If you would like a sharp, clear look at what is really going on in Israel/Palestine today, look no further than this book.
-Hila Rosenfeld, from Israel
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