Customer Reviews

10
4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
The Enterprise Unified Process: Extending the Rational Unified Process
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$49.04 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
In the interests of disclosure, I must share that I was one of the technical reviewers for this fascinating book. But my recommendations of it are based upon its sensible content. Here is my take on how the Enterprise Unified Process can improve your organization.

Enterprise thinking is not about thinking "bigger", it's about thinking differently. The Enterprise Unified Process is a qualitative leap forward that will change the scope of your project from simply a development lifecycle to a SYSTEM lifecycle. The authors aptly recommend that if you are not yet using an iterative process, then you should first adopt the Rational UP, Scrum, FDD or other project-focused development process. But if your needs go beyond merely managing or executing development projects, you will need to move to the EUP.

Structurally, the EUP builds on the RUP, and augments RUP to address the needs of an enterprise rather than just software development. Structurally, the EUP adds two new phases to RUP: the Production phase and the Retirement Phase. The Production phase begins after RUP's Transition phase, and this is where each release of software spends its entire life after it is developed. The activities of the Production phase focus on keeping your software and systems running, backed-up, and that defect reports are being addressed. The Retirement phase defines the activities involved in removing software, or a system, from production. Retirement is a complex process that can be accomplished all-at-once, or incrementally over time, but retirement always requires coordination with other processes in your organization.

EUP adds a new support Discipline to RUP: the Operations and Support Discipline. This discipline includes disaster planning and recovery, service-level agreements between operations and support teams, and addressing end-user questions and problem reports for systems in production.

But EUP goes far beyond vanilla RUP with the addition of "Enterprise Management Disciplines" that are specific and unique to the enterprise context. Here, EUP introduces the disciplines and associated roles and activities for:

* Enterprise Business Modeling

* Portfolio Managment

* Enterprise Architecture

* Strategic Reuse

* People Management

* Enterprise Administration

* Software Process Improvement

Each discipline is explained clearly with discussion of the workflows that are executed, sample case studies, tools that can assist you in the discipline, and--my favorite--"anti-patterns" for each discipline. For me the anti-patterns helped me to better understand each discipline's goals.

If you are familiar with RUP, you should have a feeling now for how much RUP does not address for the enterprise, and how much the EUP has to offer. But how can an organization move to EUP? Luckily, the authors conclude the book with sound recommendations on adopting the EUP. If you are involved with, or responsible for, software development to support your company's business goals, this book will help you understand the many dimensions that RUP does not begin to address.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
Scott Ambler and the crew at Ronin have helped define the nature of Agile development (see [...]) and that is the task set here : make RUP, a very structured IT development process more agile and flexible. But also along the way, Scott and crew also help to make it more complete - they bring the single process up into a larger framework of an organizational viewpoint. This is aided by extending the Zachman framework slightly plus adding three key components to the RUP development cycle.

First, the the RUP Transition is expanded into Transition, Production and Retirement. By explicitly bringing a complete cycle view of development key IT asset issues are addressed which otherwise might be omitted. Ditto for adding Strategic Reuse and Software Process Improvement - these are tough issues to handle. For example, many eXtreme Programming adherents are dead set against any amounts of time spent on Reuse and Strategic Improvements; but Scott and company set some disciplined guidelines for both processes.

But the most important contribution of the book is to set reasonable goals for modeling and planning- in effect, EUP strives to make these activities deliver clear benefits measured better team communications, consensus building and measurable targets and process goals. Agile uses models as tests of design.

So what is missing, since we rated this 4 on 5. First, although the book does treat risk management it does not use it as a guide to process effectiveness - those models and plans and every step of the EUP process better help reduce the risks of a project or one of its phases going awry or they have failed to deliver. See Boehm and Turner's Balancing Agility and Discipline for the risk based approach to project management. Second, SOA-Service Oriented Architectures and Web Services are changing the nature of development profoundly because they up the value of workflow and integration between systems (long neglected in IT projects). As noted EUP catches some of this but unfortunately does not look at the specific ramifications.

But overall this book is conundrum challenging - its a disciplined and fruitful look at making a structured planning process more agile.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 12, 2005
The Enterprise Unified Process (EUP) unites diverse disciplines, including development, enterprise architecture, operations, production and portfolio management, reuse and business process modeling, under an easy to follow framework. It was refreshing to find a book that recognizes the need to accommodate the installed base of existing software as part of the planning, development and deployment process. This is an excellent guide for any manager who wants to ensure that essential IT disciplines are addressed.

The focus of EUP is to enhance the commonly accepted Rational Unified Process (RUP). The authors have added new disciplines to RUP that include business modeling, portfolio management, enterprise administration, reuse, enterprise architecture and process improvement. The introduction of business modeling into the overall process is essential to weave IT processes and disciplines into the most essential driver of any systems initiative - the business. The enterprise architecture discussion was also refreshing given that many organizations have forgone this discipline and have created redundant, stovepipe applications and data structures that significantly stifle business agility.

The "Reuse" chapter raises the rarely deployed reuse strategy. It is critically important to not replicate business processes, models, systems, data structures, source code and interfaces. The costs and risks of trying to keep parallel assets synchronized have been written about extensively. This book promotes the idea that reuse is just another aspect of the enterprise unified process. It is also one of the few discussions about reuse that recognizes the value of harvesting existing assets.

Also of note is the portfolio management discussion that focuses attention on the need to incorporate project management with application management. It should be noted, however, that portfolio management has much less focus on applications than the traditional industry definition as promoted by Gartner, Inc.

Finally, this book makes great use of tips, tool references and citations to books or papers that readers can use to expand on their understanding of a given topic. The last chapter of the book takes a realistic and honest look at deploying the enterprise unified process, including its possible retirement.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on June 28, 2005
The book provides a very readable coverage of IBM's Rational Unified Process, as well as useful extensions that address important aspects of enterprise systems planning, development, and management. The systematic and disciplined treatment is greatly enhanced by the inclusion of much useful, pragmatic advice that draws from the practical experience of the authors in building real systems.

I quite liked this book. Although it doesn't give enough emphasis to conceptual data analysis (something RUP has always been weak on), it has loads of useful, practical content that make it a worthwhile addition to the literature.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on May 4, 2005
I am so impressed with this book! It does a great job at filling in many of the gaps in RUP. The Life of a software system is so much more than just the development cycle. Unfortunately, so much "process" stuff these days focuses on developing the software without regard to some very important facts. For instance, IF the development and installation processes are successful (and we hope they will be) then someone will need to maintain the system.

EUP thoughtfully guides us through supporting that system while in production and then eventually retiring such a system.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on July 23, 2005
This book is must readying for any organization using -- or attempting to use -- the RUP. The EUP's additional disciplines completes the RUP in a necessary and sufficient manner.

The book is written in a straight-forward manner, is easy to read and is well-organized. Each chapter reminds you to be practical (the antipatterns), explains how the additional discipline relates to the others and provides software tools and suggested reading.

Don't RUPture your software development efforts without having the more comprehensive approach of the EUP!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on July 28, 2013
(My company-internal review)
I've used Scott Ambler's web site as a resource quite a bit (over the years he's done quite a lot in RUP, Agile, UML at various places including a stint as Practice Leader Agile Development at IBM). I started reading "Agile Modeling" and was so in agreement I also decided to get the "EUP" book because it purports to address the, well, whole enterprise view of what is happening beyond Agile's persistent focus only on software development techniques.

What I was hoping for was something that wove together the various IT disciplines in a way that made sense of the variety of situations we see and (since this is his forte) how Agile fits.

Well, what it does well is present an end-to-end lifecycle view - "inception to retirement" and the multiple disciplines that participate - from Operations to Architects to Re-use Engineers to Test and so on - what they do, what they deliver. Some good reference stuff on what makes up an IT organization.

What is missing is the bit that puzzles me - how to get an organization to grasp the ideas, how to become competent in them (different than "grasping") and how to orchestrate the whole to do work. It so often seems there are limited options - mindless waterfall and "sorta agile". Or 'radical' Agile ("documents bad; models bad"), as seen at one customer, which makes no sense to me as an enterprise method of working.

So, mixed reaction to the book; some good learning bits; some reinforcing bits; continued frustration at improving the ways of the world. I think that, in the end, a lot of it comes down to having really really good people, with some specialized skills and also generalized skills, that understand the value each brings and gets the job done
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
If you are using the Rational Unified Process, or considering doing so, and worried about applying it to a whole IT department rather than separate projects then this book could well be useful. The book has four parts - From RUP to EUP, Beyond Development, Enterprise Management Disciplines and Putting it all Together. Each section has several chapters and the chapters all start with a nice reader ROI section (showing the payoff for reading that chapter). The writing is clear and there are plenty of diagrams, tables and helpful tips.

The book starts of with some background in the RUP. I particularly liked the description of RUP as serial in the large and iterative in the small. Within the RUP there are also nine disciplines (Business Modeling, Requirements, Analysis and Design, Implementation, Test, Deployment, Configuration and Change Management, Project Management, and Environment). The authors outline 10 best practices they see as core to the EUP (they extend the original 6 in RUP) - Develop iteratively, Manage requirements, Proven architecture, Modeling, Continuously verify quality, Manage change, Collaborative development, Look beyond deployment, Deliver working software regularly and Manage risk. Each is clearly described.

In addition to the change best practices, EUP adds a Production phase and a Retirement phase. They point out that the Production phase is not just maintenance or just operations and support but both and more. I think that any organization building systems should spend as much time and effort thinking about production and running their application in production (which includes maintaining it over time) as they do in building it and I was glad to see this so strongly proposed. They also added an operations and support discipline, mostly but not entirely in the production phase. This discipline includes running the system and making hot fixes. I think the Retirement phase is overkill for most organizations but some will find it useful.

They also added some "Enterprise Management" disciplines for use outside the context of a project and this too is a good idea. The disciplines are Enterprise business modeling, Enterprise Portfolio Management, Enterprise Architecture (I particularly liked the idea that "modifiability" should be considered as part of an enterprise architecture - far too few organizations do this well and fail to differentiate between stable services and much more changeable ones), Strategic Reuse (Again I liked the called-out focus on this - without a real plan no reuse is going to happen), People management , Enterprise Administration and Software Process Improvement (Another good one and a timely reminder to all that you should keep improving your software processes)

Overall I liked the book, though it was a somewhat dry subject (as methodologies often are). There was a lot of good advice, some nice tips and some clearly hard-won experience being shared!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
In their book, "The Enterprise Unified Process: Extending the Rational Unified Process", Scott Ambler, John Nalbone, and Michael Vizdos boldly lead the reader out of the myopia of RUP's single project focus into the light of enterprise-wide IT disciplines and processes.
This book provides proven approaches to the enterprise-wide challenges inherent to developing, maintaining, and operating complex IT environments and projects. Enterprise Architects will want to pay particular attention to the chapter, "The Enterprise Administration Discipline" when working with ITSM groups utilizing ITIL Version 3. This chapter facilitates communication and collaboration between Enterprise Architecture teams and IT Service Management teams. Professionals on IT projects who are unfamiliar with the nature and purpose of Enterprise Architecture will want to particular attention to the chapter, "The Enterprise Architecture Discipline". This chapter defines the Enterprise Architecture function, and shows why it lies beyond the bounds of a single project; a common misunderstanding for RUP practitioners.
__Joseph Starwood ([...])
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on April 18, 2006
Many IT organizations still pursue pet projects and develop duplicate applications in isolation, only to address later crises in corporate reporting, portfolio management, IT infrastructure, business objectives, and other areas.

EUP gives a coherent roadmap of how to architect smarter and for the long term. For organizations that don't have a strong enterprise aptitude, this book is a lifesaver. The EUP provides the business case for implementing EUP that will help cut through the politics by addressing the benefits to the bottom line for pursuing an Enterprise Unified Process.

I will be referencing the EUP regularly, and passing it around to others in my organization!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.