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The Episcopalians Paperback – September 1, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 361 pages
  • Publisher: CHURCH PUBLISHING INC (September 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898694973
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898694970
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #604,538 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"How do you characterize a denomination that is doctrinally indifferent, liturgically lush, culturally elite, politically conservative, socially liberal, and that Thomas Merton once described as little more than an "atmosphere"? Hein and Shattuck have risen to the challenge with this lively, well-balanced, and readable book....Highly recommended. General readers; lower-level undergraduates and above."-Choice

Book Description

This book offers a fresh account of the Episcopal Church's rise to prominence in America.

--This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

DAVID HEIN, historian and educator

Dr Hein was educated at St Paul's School (Brooklandville, MD), the University of Virginia, and the University of Chicago. At his undergraduate school, UVa, he was elected to membership in the Raven Society and Omicron Delta Kappa; he was, in addition, an Echols Scholar and a Lawn Resident. During the summer following his third undergraduate year, he was an English-Speaking Union Scholar at Oxford University, where he read British literature with the legendary tutor Dorothy Bednarowska.

His PhD thesis became the first of his ten books: "Essays on Lincoln's Faith and Politics" (coauthor with Hans J. Morgenthau; 1983), recently called a "pioneering" study in the Lincoln field by historian Mark Noll. An edited collection, "Religion and Politics in Maryland on the Eve of the Civil War: The Letters of W. Wilkins Davis" (rev. ed., 2009), won an award from the American Association for State and Local History. "The Episcopalians" (2004) was a selection of the History Book Club.

Recently, Professor Hein has focused his research on the period of the Second World War: "In War for Peace: General George C. Marshall's Core Convictions and Ethical Leadership," Touchstone (March 2013); "Counterpoint to Combat: The Education of Airborne Commander James M. Gavin," ARMY (July 2013); and "Vulnerable: HMS Prince of Wales in 1941," Journal of Military History (July 2013). An earlier article on the war appeared in Anglican and Episcopal History: "Hugh Lister (1901-1944): Priest, Labor Leader, Combatant Officer" (2001).

Dr Hein's writings also include more than 50 articles in Modern Age, the Mississippi Quarterly, the Journal of Ecclesiastical History, and other distinguished periodicals.

A well-known historian, David Hein has been interviewed by NBC News, the Christian Science Monitor, the New York Times, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, the Associated Press, Religion News Service, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, and other media outlets.

In 2000-01 and 2007-08, he served as an interim Dean of the Faculty. Twice he has received his institution's highest faculty award for scholarship and teaching.

In 2011 he was nominated and elected a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (UK) in recognition of his "original" and "significant" contributions to historical scholarship.

Dr Hein has delivered several endowed lectures, including the Jaak Seynaeve Memorial Lecture at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, in 2012.

In 2013 he accepted an invitation to become an Affiliated Scholar of the John Jay Institute, in Philadelphia, which sponsors programs in ethics and leadership.

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Michael B. Gehl on May 8, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a recently confirmed member of the Episcopalian Communion, I was quite happy to find this new volume from The Greenwood Press series on denominational studies, an excellent successor to the American Church History Series (1893-1897). While there have been innumerable works on American religious denominations in the interim (including the constantly revised "Handbook of Denominations in the United States"), this series allows for a deeper and richer look into the history, evolution and specific theologies and practices of the major American denominations.
"The Episcopalians" is divided into two parts, namely a history of American Anglicanism/Episcopalianism by chronology, and a biographical history of the major leaders and luminaries in the Church's North American odyssey. Beginning with the antecedent Church of England and its relationship with the expanding Colonial Church, the story progresses through the tribulations of the Anglican Communion during and following the American Revolution, when the inevitable "split" from the Mother Church nearly destroyed the well-established (but "Bishopless") American parishes. With the final post-Independence reorganization of the church into the present day Episcopal Church in America, there followed the trauma of the Civil War, with its attendant near-schism over the issue of slavery (which, in contradistinction to other major American denominations, actually never occurred). History does not paint a very flattering picture of the Southern Churches, many of which were strong opponents of Emancipation; however, the Church survived, albeit wounded and suffering, as was the Nation.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By David Montgomery on February 13, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Hein and Shattuck have written a highly readable and inclusive book on the history of the Episcopal Church from the early days at Jamestown, Virginia to the present day. They have divided the book into two sections; the first section covers the broader history of the church while the last section offers mini-biographical sketches of many influential men and women in the Episcopal Church.

Before it became the Protestant Episcopal Church, it was originally the Anglican Church, under the control of the Church of England before the American Revolution. The Episcopal Church is still part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, but no longer under direct control from England. The Anglicans were better established in parts of the southern colonies like Virginia than they were in New England, which was by and large inhabited by colonists who have been labeled either as Puritans or Separatists, those who either had cut off connections with the English Church or wanted to purify its teachings. With Britain's defeat after the American Revolution, American Anglicans had to struggle to survive as a vibrant, active denomination, eventually reorganizing into the Protestant Episcopal Church during the 1780s and 1790s.

The Episcopal Church, like many other denominations, has faced many challenges both external and internal. The Civil War briefly divided the church along sectional lines, social and economic conditions challenged the church to respond to those in need, leading to increased activism on the part of many church leaders, and contentions between conservative theology and more liberal, modernist views have threatened the unity of the church.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Philip Blosser on June 4, 2005
Format: Hardcover
How do you characterize a denomination that is doctrinally indifferent, liturgically lush, culturally elite, politically conservative, socially liberal, and which Thomas Merton once described as little more than an "atmosphere"? Hein and Schattuck have risen to the challenge with this lively, well-balanced and readable book. Part One is a history, beginning with the denomination's Anglican origins in Henry VIII's divorce and tracing its American development up through its election of an openly gay bishop in 2003. It is never quite made clear whether this influential denomination, which has furnished a disproportionately large share of American political and cultural leadership, is actually leading or merely blowing with the wind. This question arises not only with the denomination's vanguard positions on contraception, civil rights, ordination of women and gays, but in its perennial reluctance to address the difficult issues attendant to its Anglican origins, such as William Cobbett addresses in his history of the Reformation in England. Part Two, the largest part of the book, offers a stunning list of biographical profiles, including Robert E. Lee, J.P. Morgan, George Whitefield, and many less-known churchmen, women leaders, and missionaries. Recommended for general readers. Despite one or two historical reservations, a darn good read.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Richard F. Hager on December 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book is very much as advertised; it provides a thorough but not overly dry history of the Church in America. It moves along at the right pace- not too much in depth but certainly enough to give us the events which shaped the development of the denomination here. Those who want to explore more can refer to the many references in the extensive bibliography which is provided at the end of each chapter and at the end. It is all well organised. The writing is seamless between the two authors which also makes this a smooth read. The biographies of the prominent figures in the church are also brief enough to provide an overview of their respective contributions. My only criticism of the book is with the biography section- they are all "early" figures (17th, 18th, 19th century) and none of the recent notables that we today might be- or should be- familiar with. All in all, you will learn much from this book.
R. Hager, New Jersey
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