Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $1.72 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Minimal damage to cover and binding. Pages show light use. With pride from Motor City. All books guaranteed. Best Service, Best Prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Erasers Paperback – January 21, 1994


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$49.09
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.28
$6.50 $0.86

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.


Frequently Bought Together

The Erasers + The Voyeur + Jealousy and In the Labyrinth (Two Novels)
Price for all three: $34.55

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Rosie Effect
Bill Gates calls it "profound" -- check out Graeme Simsion's sequel to best seller "The Rosie Project," available now. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Robbe-Grillet, Alain
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press; 1st Evergreen Ed edition (January 21, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802150861
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802150868
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.4 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #741,376 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Howard is a Pulitzer Prize winning poet and translator.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By someone has hacked my email, I did not write these reviews on February 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
While this is billed as "a pure detective tale or as a complex, many leveled novel," those who are expecting a whodunit will be disappointed. There is certainly a crime: for the eight days preceding the opening of the book a murder has been committed in some part of the country at the same time every day, presumably by the same terrorist group. Now economist Daniel Dupont has been murdered, or has he? Wallas is sent from the Bureau to solve the crime---or is he really the assassin? The book has action and even an ending, but there the similarity with the mystery novel ends. It is more like the British television series "The Prisoner" that aired in the 70's.

The action goes back and forth between flashbacks, characters, and ruminations. The same scene is described over and over from the viewpoint of different characters...or is it an imagined event? One character climbing a stairs dissolves into another character climbing a different stairs (or is it) dissolves into another (or is it) character obsessing about how he will climb the same set of stairs. The sound of a buzzer dissolves into the sound of a woman's voice. Another character plans a detailed suicide, but it is only in the imagination of the local police inspector, who realizes there are social limitations to who can be accused of a murder and is determined to report a believable suicide. And is it the hero staring into the canal or the bartender staring into the fishtank?

In the end we are left to sort out the fantasies from actual happenings and possible motivations.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By K. DeV on September 12, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this many years ago after borrowing it from a friend and had to buy it now to own it and re-read it. My friend read it for a class and came to love it. He told me about and I found the plot intriquing. It's more than that. It's fascinating! Robbe-Grillet writes in such an unusual style which you soon grab on to, and then it pulls you in. As another reviewer said, take nothing for granted. Everything is important. If you like trite stories with no plot aside from the "been there done that" type, then don't buy this. You'll probably hate it. But if you enjoy being captivated by a story, and want a story and plot line to take you somewhere, this is it. This is a story which requires you to think. The story and the plot fold in and on themselves and becomes tangled, but then unfolds and reveals the brilliant mind of the author. A literary masterpiece!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 13, 1997
Format: Paperback
The narration and elaborate descirptions in this book lure the reader in more and more. You cannot let one single aspect of the narration escape you, it's too important to the impact of the ending. There is also a plot within a plot in this book; the unfolding of events is extremely well done. I couldn't put it down because as the reader, you feel more omnicient than the characters and can't wait to see the final outcome.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mark Nadja on February 2, 2008
Format: Paperback
Although his first novel and written when Robbe-Grillet was still quite young, *The Erasers* has most of the stylistic and thematic elements that characterize his later and greater work. Which is to say, *The Erasers* is a good deal more conventional a text than one might expect from one of the leading practitioners and theorists of the "New Novel." What you have here is a novel that reads something like a David Lynch movie--there is a discernible storyline--beginning, middle, and end in the old-school sense--but like a splintered mirror, the shards reflect a picture back upon itself in what seem an infinite number of possible explanatory scenarios.

In *The Erasers* a "special agent" named Wallas arrives in an unnamed town to investigate a murder linked to a series of similar assassinations believed to be carried out by a terrorist group intent on disrupting the nation's political and economic stability. But that's only one theory why Professor Daniel Dupont was shot to death in his study. Another theory is that he committed suicide. Another is that he isn't dead at all since no one--including the cynical local police commissioner--has seen the body, which has supposedly been lost in a labyrinthine bureaucracy. What witnesses exist are entirely unreliable. Wallas himself apparently looks a good deal like a stranger believed to be the killer. And the city with its frustrating layout of look-a-like streets and canals that seem to duplicate and double-back on each other becomes a maze through which Wallas wanders as exhausted physically as he is mentally.

Robbe-Grillet always a master of atmospheric foreboding provides plenty of it in this "existential" thriller.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By J on December 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
I can see why some would dislike the style of this novel. For one, it is (purposely) written in a dry, deceivingly impersonal way. The scenes and even the sentences are fragmented. But that's what this story is all about-taking the fragments and putting them back together. Can also be read as a very fragmented version of the Oedipus story-in fact I think reading it as such will add much understanding to the otherwise confusing tale. I loved reading this book. This was one of the few books that I enjoyed the style of the writing more than the story and characters. I found it delightfully confusing. Like being a little drunk, this book was fun though disorienting. Besides the fragments, there are flashbacks, same scenes described by multiple characters, scenes in which you are not sure if the information is accurate. It was very dreamlike to me. Though you know before most what happened to Dupont, it is still mysterious how it all unfolds. As I said, I loved the style of writing even more than the story. This was my first encounter with Robbe-Grillet and I will actively seek out more of his books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?