The Essential 55 and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $4.60 (29%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Essential 55: An Awar... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Good | Details
Sold by owlsbooks
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Book is used, fast shipping and great customer service.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Essential 55: An Award-Winning Educator's Rules For Discovering the Successful Student in Every Child Paperback – July 21, 2004


See all 27 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.40
$4.79 $0.01
$11.40 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In stock but may require an extra 1-2 days to process. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Essential 55: An Award-Winning Educator's Rules For Discovering the Successful Student in Every Child + The Excellent 11: Qualities Teachers and Parents Use to Motivate, Inspire, and Educate Children + The End of Molasses Classes: Getting Our Kids Unstuck--101 Extraordinary Solutions for Parents and Teachers (Touchstone Book)
Price for all three: $34.22

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; Reprint edition (July 21, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786888164
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786888160
  • Product Dimensions: 5 x 7.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (246 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #18,274 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The winner of the 2001 Disney Teacher of the Year Award presents some revolutionary ideas for the classroom: manners, industriousness and accountability. Many of the 55 rules Clark outlines read, at first, like excerpts from a 1950's primer: "If you are asked a question in conversation, you should ask a question in return," says Rule 6; stand to the right on escalators, insists Rule 43; and rule 29 includes 26 sub-rules about polite eating. Clark may seem like a bit of a fussbudget, but closer examination shows his rules go beyond simple politeness: they promote respect for self and others, and help foster a mature and responsible way of living in the world. As Clark explains each rule, he weaves in anecdotes of student projects, class trips (including one to Washington, D.C., where his students sang Christmas carols with the Clintons) and instances in which the particular rule proved invaluable. Clark, a North Carolina native, writes with a warm, Southern friendliness, and his cogent explanations about why he created his rules and his closing tips on dealing with parents and children offer plenty of ideas and much-needed support. Teachers will have to be determined to succeed before any set of guidelines will have an effect in the classroom, he warns-and indeed, Clark's tireless dedication might be daunting to some. And while the content of his lessons is presented only vaguely, for inspiration, this book is a definite winner; it also makes a strong case that students lack only good teachers to achieve great things. Clark's slim but valuable volume will make a welcome addition to any teacher's library.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"Clark's book is a handy blueprint for parents who want to equip their elementary- and middle-school children..." -- Time magazine --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Ron Clark has been a teacher since 1995. Originally from North Carolina, he has taught in some of the most difficult schools in the country, most recently in Harlem, New York. Since winning the 2001 Disney Teacher of the Year Award, Clark has spoken to teachers, PTAs, and school boards across the country. He lives in Atlanta.

Customer Reviews

I highly recommend this book to new and veteran teachers.
Amazon Customer
Sometimes, I am influenced to buy and read a particular book because I see someone I know and respect reading that book.
Matthew Dodd
Ron Clark attributes much of his success to making sure that the students follow the 55 rules.
Harold McFarland

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

132 of 142 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Daneman #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Ron Clark teaches school. He has 55 rules of "engagement" for anything from good manners (Don't take the largest piece of pie, Always say Thank-You, Make Eye Contact) to rules of responsibility and deportment (Enter the field trip building silently, Do not talk in the movies, unwrap your candy before the film to keep from disturbing others.)
These rules teach his students to be polite and attentive, to understand if they don't hand in assignments, there will be consequences (even if the assignment is just a little blue card they have to return to him the next day.) But Ron is no martinet--he has weird rules (No Doritos, just because...and a funny story to make the rule amusing.) His War of the Onions against a sadly jealous fellow teacher is both hysterically funny and touching.
Ron Clark shows the world that kids anywhere can learn to be well-brought up and polite, that manners and rules help them succeed. He makes the very important point that a teacher is an important influence since he or she is with those kids for more time during the day than the parents.
This book is fun to read and is a great story. It is also a MUST-READ for any school teacher who wants to excel with their students and give them something of tremendous value to carry them through the rest of their lives with honor and grace--good manners and good behavior.
Bravo, Ron Clark!
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
104 of 122 people found the following review helpful By Linda B Dunlap on April 29, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Manners, Respect and Discipline are the cornerstones of success in Ron Clark's classroom. In his first book, The Essential 55, he shares the secrets of that success. Disney Teacher of the Year, Ron Clark has the uncanny ability to instill fun and adventure into every learning opportunity. Daily he shares with his students an unbridled curiosity about the world! However at the start of their journey together, Ron conveys to the class the 55 essential expectations that he has for them. For example, he instructs them in how to give a firm handshake, look people in the eye, and eat properly using the rules of etiquette. His classes learn to respect themselves and others. Chart busting academic scores have been the result for his classes of low performing students from North Carolina to New York City. In The Essential 55 Mr. Clark provides guidelines for living both inside and outside the classroom. He exhorts young and old alike to embrace each day with heart and vigor, appreciate and encourage others and challenge themselves to achieve their potential. Read how Ron Clark convinces his students to seek lives of abundant adventure and fulfillment. I highly recommend this extraordinary book!
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
63 of 77 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
After it's all said and done, I find simple is always better. In teaching students how to write, I try to get them to feel their heart and soul in a essay or story but to keep it pure and simple. This is what I have found to be true in Ron Clark's book. Loving, caring and making kids feel proud of who they are is one of the highlights in The Essential 55. It is not only for teachers but parents would benefit from it as well. It's easy to see why he won the Disney's American Teacher Award. Showing kids why or how they will be in certain situations and then clearly preparing them for a future under those upcoming circumstances is what most teachers try to accomplish but often times, miss the boat in connecting with the students. I find his work to be inspirational and warm. It makes all of us want to do better for kids and life in general. He chose to pick up the forgotten and encourage them to listen and be all they can be and even more. I read most of the time; it's my life. In looking at other authors and their success, it seems that they all have one thing in common, beleiving in themselves and sharing their passion to inspire others to beleive. Two of my other favorite and highly recommended books for teachers and parents are similar in passion and spirit about reaching out to kids: The Bully, the Bullied, and the Bystander, by Barbara Coloroso, 2003 (leaves no questions unanswered) and Mommy-CEO, updated book, 2001 by syndicated family columnist, Jodie Lynn (book is on family issues and school as an integral part). Every school library, city library, bookstore and every home should have all three books. Read them and you shall get answers that will behoove any current situation - in school or at home - and condition thinking patterns that need to be changed for kids and family from this day forward. THANKS TO ALL OF THE AUTHORS AND ONWARD for more books!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
70 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Maggie on June 8, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The fact that the author received an award from Disney is appropriate. Many of his ideas are straight from Fantasyland. Reward (cookies!)/punishment (and punishing all for the sins of a few) is NOT sound educational philosophy. This book is probably the shallowest book for teachers I've read in 30 years. Not to mention impractical (how many teachers can take their students on all those outings?) Here's the scoop: teachers must set a manageable list of rules (55 is far too many), and strive to fairly enforce them and be a role model for etiquette and compassion for others. Classrooom management based on rewards and punishments has many limitations. Students must take responsibility for their own actions and understand why; teachers need to look beneath the surface to get at why their students are acting they way they are. Then meet those needs on an individual basis. This takes hard work, experience, and a desire to understand the phsychological needs of children. This book does not do that at all. When Clark holds up a lunch line until a girl admits to cutting in, he is handling the situation in the worst way possible, typical of a rookie teacher. When he takes away a set of books a girl has earned fair-and-square because she didn't say thank you in 3 seconds, he is causing more harm than good and I think most adults can see that. When he advises teachers to make up a totally ridiculous rule and enforce it (the famous Doritos rule), what is he trying to teach-- mindless compliance to an authority figure? When he brags about his pranks on Mrs. Bitterman, I was appalled. His onion prank taught his students to be obnoxious and disrespectful to someone simply because he felt she deserved it. This negates all his efforts to teach manners! Most teachers would be fired for such behavior.

He's bright, egotistical, funny, and wants to set the world of education on its ear by showing how marvelous he is. Good plan. Bad book.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again