Qty:1
  • List Price: $21.99
  • Save: $2.30 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Evil Princes of Marti... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Medium wrinkle / bend on back cover.
Trade in your item
Get a $0.81
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Evil Princes of Martin Place: The Reserve Bank of Australia, the Global Financial Crisis Paperback – January 14, 2011


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$19.69
$17.52 $17.19
$19.69 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Evil Princes of Martin Place: The Reserve Bank of Australia, the Global Financial Crisis + The Road to Serfdom: Text and Documents--The Definitive Edition (The Collected Works of F. A. Hayek, Volume 2)
Price for both: $30.89

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 662 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (January 14, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1456475320
  • ISBN-13: 978-1456475321
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 7.3 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,693,840 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Chris Leithner is a Director of Leithner & Company Pty Ltd (www.leithner.com.au), a private investment company in Brisbane. He is also the author of The Intelligent Australian Investor: Timeless Principles and Fresh Applications (John Wiley & Sons Australia, 2005).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
One of the most amazing books I have ever read.
Robear
Although titled as if for Australians, the book mostly uses the US as its source of information.
Colin the Bear
Chris Leithner makes delving into the economic history of booms and busts exciting.
Bradley Doucet

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robear on February 26, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the most amazing books I have ever read. Chris Leithner is obviously a great intellect and it shows in this book.

He painstakingly takes the reader on a journey through time on the nature of money, banking, economics and political influences.
The book is necessarily detailed and it can take some time to comprehend the message but it is well worth the effort. The conclusions are forthright and downright scary but enlighten the reader in a way that one will never get from mainstream media.

I can't recommend this book highly enough to anyone who wants to truly understand the nature of banking and the future of fiat money itself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Private Citizen on July 17, 2011
Format: Paperback
Chris is a voice in the wilderness in Australia. I 'discovered' his company and his newsletters after becoming interested in 'value' investing before the GFC. His writing is always erudite and logical. I think it is useful for him to bring the Austrian School of economics and libertarian perspective to the Australian context and recommend thoughtful people, specially Aussies, take the time to read his books.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By P. Coleman on March 7, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This was a fascinating read and the author, who adheres to the Austrian school of economics, has done an enormous amount of research to back up his arguments. I will read it a second time in the not too distant future because there's too much to be absorbed in just one reading.

One of the strong points about this book that I especially liked is the discussion of the ethical and moral arguments concerning free markets and the rarely discussed evil traps of democracy. One of the more interesting lines of thought was the way that corrupt financial systems will also corrupt citizens.

This book has helped to reignite my interest and enthusiasm in free markets and a free society. Theree is much on economics and much on the philosophy of freedom. I am recommending it to my libertarian friends. And it's at a very attractive price too considering it has nearly 600 pages of text. This is a valuable addition to the cause of sound money and a free society, with a (slightly) Australian slant.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bradley Doucet on February 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
What has caused the world's ongoing financial troubles? Those who rail against the deregulation of the capitalist system and the greed of bankers are only half wrong. But the supposed 'deregulation' that took place in recent decades, far from exposing bankers to the discipline of market forces, instead privatized gains and socialized losses. Likewise, those who pin the blame on government efforts to encourage subprime mortgages to un-creditworthy borrowers are not seeing the whole picture. Ultimately, the cause of this bust, like the cause of practically all busts, is the artificial boom that preceded it. And the cause of the artificial boom is the inflation of the money supply.

There is of course much, much more to the story, and you'll find it all related with clarity and wit in The Evil Princes of Martin Place. Chris Leithner makes delving into the economic history of booms and busts exciting. Exploring from first principles why modern, fractional reserve banking is both immoral and impractical, illegitimately benefitting the powerful few and harming the rest, got my blood boiling. And the author's frequent humorous quips took the edge off without lessening the power of his message.

Everyone who wants to understand the current crisis, and explore the history and theory behind it, should read this book. Advanced degrees are entirely optional, as Leithner assumes no in-depth knowledge of economics, explaining concepts clearly and concisely.

More specifically, I think this book holds many treasures for anyone who senses that there is indeed something wrong with modern banking, but is at least somewhat unsatisfied with the explanations offered by people like Michael Moore.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again