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The Evolution of International Human Rights: Visions Seen (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) [Paperback]

Paul Gordon Lauren
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)

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There is a newer edition of this item:
The Evolution of International Human Rights: Visions Seen (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) The Evolution of International Human Rights: Visions Seen (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) 4.7 out of 5 stars (12)
$23.44
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Book Description

July 22, 2003 081221854X 978-0812218541 2nd

This widely acclaimed and highly regarded book, embraced by students, scholars, policymakers, and activists, now appears in a new edition. Using the theme of visions seen by those who dreamed of what might be, Lauren explores the dramatic transformation of a world patterned by centuries of traditional structures of authority, gender abuse, racial prejudice, class divisions and slavery, colonial empires, and claims of national sovereignty into a global community that now boldly proclaims that the way governments treat their own people is a matter of international concern—and sets the goal of human rights "for all peoples and all nations."

Lauren makes clear the truly universal nature of this movement by drawing into his discussion people and cultures in every part of the globe. In this regard, the book offers particularly remarkable revelations and insights when analyzing the impact of wars and revolutions, non-Western nations, struggles against sexism and racism, liberation movements and decolonization, nongovernmental organizations, and the courage and determination of countless numbers of common men and women who have contributed to the evolution of international human rights.

This new edition incorporates the most recent developments of the International Criminal Court, the arrest of Augusto Pinochet and the trial of Slobodan Milosevic, technology and the Internet, the impact of NGOs like Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch, globalization, terrorism, and the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks.


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The Evolution of International Human Rights: Visions Seen (Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights) + Inventing Human Rights: A History + The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Praise for the first edition:



"A beautifully written and meticulously researched history of the idea of human rights."—American Journal of International Law



"It is difficult to imagine a finer gift on the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights than this study of the Declaration's complex and far-reaching impact. Paul Gordon Lauren has skillfully combined a detailed history of the legal documents with the political, philosophical, and social context in which they developed."—American Historical Review



"An indispensable reference source for scholars and students of human rights."—Political Science Quarterly

About the Author

Paul Gordon Lauren is Regents Professor at the University of Montana. He is the author of a number of books, including Power and Prejudice. He has lectured widely and delivered invited addresses, at the Smithsonian Institution and the United Nations, on the subject of human rights.

Product Details

  • Series: Pennsylvania Studies in Human Rights
  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press; 2nd edition (July 22, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 081221854X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812218541
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 6.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,147,758 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
(12)
4.7 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a great book September 14, 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
"The 50th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights has loosed a spate of books on the academic world. Lauren's volume will count among the very best, with its thorough detail, wide range, and fascinating insights. This volume is a model of scholarship. It shows how visionaries and diplomats, NGOs and governments, moved from the almost totally unquestioned pre-WWII doctrine of domestic sovereignty to the current reality of global awareness of and obligations to internal human rights practices.....Belongs in the library of every college, citizen activist, or scholar interested in how one of humanity's transforming documents came into being." -- Choice
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18 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Truly International History of Human rRights October 9, 2001
Format:Paperback
One of the major things that striked me about this book is Lauren's acknowledgement that the concept of human rights is not a completely Western creation. Traditions around the world, political, cultural, and religious, have stressed justice and equality.
Lauren's treatment of Human Rights is quite thorough. I have to commend him for the fact that he does not value judgements on any of the events he described. He acknowledges the mistakes made but does not dwell on them.
I also learned a lot of things about history that wasn't touched about in my history classes. I can say that I actually felt smarter reading this book. :)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars indispensable January 25, 2000
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
"It seems fitting that Paul Lauren's book should have been published on the fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. In it, he provides the most comprehensive and exhaustively researched history of human rights ideas and the institutions to implement those ideas that has been written to date. I expect it will become an indispensable reference source for scholars and students of human rights" -- Political Science Quarterly
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars excellent October 5, 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
"This is a text which should be on the desk of every practioner in the field of human rights....absorbing." -- Dr. Colin Aikman, NZ International Review
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars an extremely significant book September 2, 1999
By A Customer
Format:Paperback
"The fiftieth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights produced many commemorative events, among the most significant of which is this beautifully written and meticulously researched history of the idea of human rights. The author, a professor at the University of Montana, traces the streams of religious and philosophical thought that merged to become the modern human rights revolution and convincingly shows that the notion of human rights is global, ancient, and evolving....The book is extremely significant....To read in this book how far we have come and how far we still hae to go is an inspiration to the activist and a challenge to the idle." --American Journal of International Law
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars From excitement to dread in two chapters February 11, 2012
Format:Paperback
I was excited when I registered for my History of Human Rights class. It's too bad this amazingly boring book is the required text. I'm sure professors love it, but for students it sucks. It sucks the life out of every movement and episode in history by reducing them to a lifeless husk of names, dates and places. It is dense with the agencies formed to enforce human rights, but there is so little humanity in this book. I can't wait until this class is over, which is disappointing to me. I've spent hundreds of dollars on a course that I am slogging through, knowing that if I want to renew my interest in this subject I have to stay away from academic classes on this subject.
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