The Exorcist (1973) 1973 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(1,306) IMDb 8/10
Available in HD

An innocent girl is evilly possessed -- and a doubting priest becomes her last hope. Linda Blair and Ellen Burstyn in the two-time Academy Award (R) winner that shocked the world.

Starring:
Ellen Burstyn, Max Von Sydow
Runtime:
2 hours 2 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Exorcist (1973)

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Product Details

Genres Horror
Director William Friedkin
Starring Ellen Burstyn, Max Von Sydow
Supporting actors Lee J. Cobb, Kitty Winn, Jack MacGowran, Jason Miller, Linda Blair, William O'Malley, Barton Heyman, Peter Masterson, Rudolf Schündler, Gina Petrushka, Robert Symonds, Arthur Storch, Thomas Bermingham, Vasiliki Maliaros, Titos Vandis, John Mahon, Wallace Rooney, Ron Faber
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

The Exorcist is not just the best horror movies of all time but one of the best films ever made.
scott belba
Who really cares about all the features you can get becuase the movie is all you need and you will know what I mean when I say shocking, scary, and disturning!
Baker K. Runge
It is a very well-made movie complete with great writing, acting, directing, and, above all, great special effects.
Randy Keehn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

185 of 205 people found the following review helpful By Michael Rogers on November 20, 2000
Format: DVD
For those of you that like The Exorcist and wondered if you should have seen the movie in the theaters *just* becuase it has some new scenes I can tell you it's definataly worth it.
The added scenes improve the continuity for the most part and provide a few new shocks (as if this movie needed more).
The soundtrack is radically reworked as well, employing newly scored music that adds to the mood of the movie.
There are new sound effects that have more "oomph" for the modern six channel digital sound.
Have the 25'th Anniversary tape? Saw the Spider walk scene in the Documentary? Well, in the new release, it's a different version and 10 times more creepy (it took a minute for the audience I was with to calm down).
It was great to see this in a theater and see people jaded by cookie cutter slasher flicks respond to this movie so well. This movie is not fast paced and that allows it to build up a foundation of dread and fear about the developing possession of the girl. Until it finally unleashes in the more horrifying scenes you've all heard about.
The overall color scheme of the movie is grayish and colorless, further drawing you into that fear and dread. The background music (the new and the limited amount utilized in the original version)has very little melody with a lot of sustained low chords. It doesn't call attention to itself but does unnerve you.
The possessed girl is probabaly one of the scariest faces in movie history. It's incredible that all that was really done to Linda Blair's face was to add a few asymetrical cuts, cover over her eyebrows and darken her sockets (giving her eyes a skull like look). But of course, it was the makeup master Dick Smith that was doing it so it's not too much of a surprise.
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164 of 183 people found the following review helpful By The JuRK on July 26, 2002
Format: DVD
I grew up in the 1970's and was a complete monster movie fan (I lived for Double Chiller Theatre on late-night TV every Friday!)--but I knew to wait until I got older to see THE EXORCIST. Listening to how the adults reacted to it, that creepy music, the ominous poster--I just knew to keep clear.
When I eventually saw it, I realized that this was the best horror film ever made.
That THE EXORCIST was left off the American Film Institute's "100 Greatest Films of All-Time" is an omission that casts doubt on the entire list.
This is one of those classic films where EVERYTHING works: the writing, the directing, the acting, etc. The extras on the DVD are extensive and fascinating (you can tell both William Friedkin and William Peter Blatty cared about every second of this film).
Most great horror films will have you turning on lights and peeking around corners, but THE EXORCIST will make you afraid to close your eyes.
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251 of 284 people found the following review helpful By Vanissa W. Chan on December 9, 2000
Format: DVD
The Exorcist has scared the living-bajeepers out of my entire family for as long as I have known. After first seeing it when I was much younger, I remember that I didn't get a good night's rest for atleast two weeks. When I told my father that I was going to see the re-release of it in the theater on Halloween night, my dad warned me and said, "Don't forget. People have fainted, thrown up and gone crazy when seeing it on big screen."
And it's true. When The Exorcist was released in the early 70's, the audience had been scared out of their wits. So what is it about The Exorcist that not just gives us the chills, but literally tears into our bodies and minds and threatens the well-being of our souls?
The Exorcist can be classified as "horror" because of the sentiments we receive when we realize that all medical and scientific reasons have been explored and have failed to explain 12-year old Regan's behavior. When all rational, logical explanations have failed, the mother Chris (who is an atheist) desperately turns to a Catholic priest for help. As the plot builds up to this, the audience is forced to question, "Does diabolical possession really exist?"
Just the idea of demons from Hell preying upon vulnerable and inviting souls is terrifying. Not only is it terrifying, but some people might take it as an insult to their lifestyles or intelligence for it asks them to turn to a source they may have denied long ago for personal reasons: The Church. Living in the scientific/information age, many of us have ruled out phenomena that are explained by mystical powers.
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42 of 44 people found the following review helpful By P. D. Clarke on February 28, 2006
Format: DVD
In the first few years after the 1973 premiere of "The Exorcist," a slew of articles and books were released discussing not only the film but the brouhaha that followed its release. Few movies had resulted in such a heated cultural debate and reaction. Director William Friedkin, and producer William Peter Blatty, writer of the novel on which the film was based, and also its screenwriter, were interviewed extensively, in endless discussion over how the movie was made and how the final version of the screenplay was drafted. For his part, Blatty never uttered a single word of dissatisfaction with the final result that hit theatre screens.

Fast-forward some twenty years. Mr. Blatty began to publicly grumble about some scenes that had been filmed but left out of the final cut. Friedkin, contradicting what had already been made known in all those books and articles back in the Seventies, vehemently denied that any such scenes ever existed, standing firm that his final cut was perfect and complete.

It looked as though a rift developed between the two, and Blatty announced plans to produce a mini-series version for Fox Television, intent upon transferring the whole of his novel to film. That never came to pass, and how could it have, given the profane nature of some major plot-points, and the language? Even Fox Television was not up to it.

Just as press notices about the mini-series died away, plans for the twenty-fifth anniversary edition of the DVD were made known. Suddenly, those scenes Friedkin had denied ever existed, mysteriously had been found.

Some of those scenes made it onto the Anniversary Edition, in the excellent attached documentary made for British television by Mark Kermode.
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