Customer Reviews


171 Reviews
5 star:
 (74)
4 star:
 (57)
3 star:
 (21)
2 star:
 (14)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


49 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant, truly intelligent thriller
Nine years after its release, "Exorcist 3" remains one of the most unfairly maligned films ever made. After the disastrous "Exorcist 2: The Heretic" (which involved neither "Exorcist" director William Friedkin nor writer William Peter Blatty), Blatty created a true sequel to the original masterpiece. Brilliant, thoughtful, and...
Published on December 2, 1999 by Arthur S. Almquist

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The DVD switch was lackluster
I've seen some excellent reviews of what the movie was about by other customers, so I won't get into the plot/storyline. My rating is about the DVD. This has been one of my favorite horror movies, from the time I first saw it in the theater.
I couldn't wait for the DVD version. I figured, with digital sound, this picture could be even scarier, despite the amount...
Published on September 7, 2000 by Steve Cimino


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

49 of 53 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant, truly intelligent thriller, December 2, 1999
This review is from: The Exorcist III [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Nine years after its release, "Exorcist 3" remains one of the most unfairly maligned films ever made. After the disastrous "Exorcist 2: The Heretic" (which involved neither "Exorcist" director William Friedkin nor writer William Peter Blatty), Blatty created a true sequel to the original masterpiece. Brilliant, thoughtful, and character-driven, "Exorcist 3" will disappoint only those who do not have the patience to listen to beautifully-crafted dialogue and allow the film to steadily weave its web. Why did the film perform poorly at the box office? In our modern canon of horror films, we've grown accustomed to horror sequels avoiding all rational reason for existing (character development, unanswered questions, etc.) and instead being conceived from the beginning as tired re-treads designed only to make money. There's even a camp value here, and many horror sequels are considered sussesses for this: more of the same; strong opening weekend; end of story. "Exorcist 3" avoids these traps, and was ultimately punished for it. First of all, the film's original title -- "Legion" -- is the proper introduction to the film's themes. Unfortunately, the choice was made that since the more intriguing and appropriate "Legion" didn't have immediate title-recognition and probably wouldn't effectively draw audiences, the more recognizable "Exorcist 3" was chosen...against Blatty's wishes, and in spite of the fact that "Exorcist 3" wisely ignores the very existence of "The Heretic" and begins where the original ended. (One does have to wonder why the producers didn't compromise with a title like "The Exorcist: Legion.") Structurally, "Exorcist 3" also attacks our senses in a much subtler (but equally unnerving) way than seen in the furious conclusion to "The Exorcist." Don't get me wrong -- "The Exorcist" is one of my favorite films, and embodies flawless film-making from beginning to end. The fact that "Exorcist 3" is much quieter and more character-driven, however, meant that many members of the original's core audience didn't know what to make of it; in addition, the plot of "Exorcist 3" requires a working knowledge of the events surrounding the original, meaning that younger viewers who hadn't even seen the original were doomed to be lost in the film's complex plot. Again, all of this is a shame. "Exorcist 3" is not only one of the smartest horror films ever made, its considerations of the nature of faith (and the imagery which surrounds these questions) make it one of the most thoughtful. Blatty has always dealt with issues of faith in his writing, and the meditations on the subject in "Exorcist 3" are among the most profound I've seen in film. Consider the question asked of Lt. Kinderman (George C. Scott) in the film's conclusion: "Have I helped your unbelief?" In the power of the moment, we expect a certain response from Kinderman. We hear a quite different one, however, and we're momentarily puzzled -- until we consider the deeper issues of faith behind the monologue and the spiritual journey Kinderman has been on. The response then makes perfect sense, and the film would work no other way. This is great writing, given even more power by Scott's performance. Because this is a thriller, the film's thrills need to be addressed. As I said, the film is much more quietly intense than the original -- but I challenge you not to leap from your chair during the payoff of the hospital hallway scene (one shot with no edits...just slowly, steadily building tension). The craftsmanship of this scene is a wonder to behold, and has deservedly received comparisons to the scene-structure of Hitchcock.Regardless of all that I've said, I can acknowledge that the film won't be for everyone. Things don't jump out at the audience every five minutes (with the requisite music stinger to make absolutely sure we jump), and I understand that many look for that and that alone. But "Exorcist 3" is so much more, and represents the work of people who cared about where their story was headed...and why. It is a genuine classic.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


52 of 57 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The TRUE sequel to the orginal Exorcist!, June 4, 2002
By 
John Margaritis (Floral Park, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
From the eerie opening dream sequence, I was drawn into this film by William Peter Blatty's great screenplay (based on his book, Legion) and confident directing. He deftly blends elements of mystery and horror together to create an atmosphere of evil that is both subtle at times and shocking at others. And just as William Friedkin did in the orginal Exorcist, the employment of auditory stimuli are used in a way that get under your skin and stay there.
The plot revolves around Detective Bill Kinderman--played this time by the great George C. Scott--trying to solve a series of gruesome murders that seem to somehow be related to the exorcism of Regan MacNeil 17 years ago. The story is allowed to develop at a relaxed pace, and will keep you guessing as to what's happening and why. But as it continues to unfold, Kinderman's faith in God, which he admits that he doesn't have much of, and his own sanity are tested by an ungodly force that he can't begin to comprehend. Blatty takes all the things we believe in and comfort us--faith in God, religious symbols, and Good over Evil--and tries to eradicate them right in front of our eyes and make us question our own comfortable reality.
Overall, there are many scenes that will bring you right out of your seat because they are so damn scary. The few parts with Kinderman interrogating the Gemini killer (Brad Dourif) are also very intense, and are a rare glimpse into the mind of a sick killer. One problem I had with the film is that the ending seemed a little too predictable and rushed, but in conclusion does not detract from the overall strength of the film that much. If you appreciate intelligent horror films (yes, there are some of them around), you should see this well-made film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


34 of 38 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easily the scariest movie of the 1990's, July 13, 2001
By 
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
Exorcist 3 is a sequel to the first exorcist in terms of story line and characters. But you can't compare the two as the two movies are not the same. Exorcist 3 is more like a serial killer movie and it is a very good one. Too bad this movie was a flop during its theatrical run so it never achieved the same popularity as the first Exorcist. But it is a very creepy and scary movie and suprisingly there is no gore portrayed in the movie. Check out chapter 22, I think that has the greatest jump in horror movie. The scene I am talking about only last a couple seconds but I guarantee that if you think of Exorcist 3 you will remember that particular scene. The late George C Scott gave superb performance as Detective Bill Kenderman who is puzzled as a serial killer that was executed in the electric chair 15 years ago appear to strike again. Look for cameo by Patrick Ewing and Fabio in a dream sequence. I would have given this 5 stars if only Warner has released this DVD with some extra features. This DVD has none except one theatrical trailer which I think shouldn't be considered as an extra feature. Warner has released the first Exorcist 3 times on DVD. I do hope they rerelease this with extra features. Meanwhile for [price] list price DVD this is an absolute must for horror fans.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Powerful sequel to The Exorcist, November 3, 2002
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
Let's be honest about The Exorcist 2--it followed the wrong character. There wasn't anything all that interesting about Linda Blair's character in the original. The meat and potatos of the film was Jason Miller as Father Karras and Max Von Sydow. In this spooky and powerful sequel based on Blatty's book Legion, George C. Scott takes on the role of Detective Bill Kinderman. The film follows Scott's pursuit of the Gemini Killer (played by the always spooky Brad Dourif). The Gemini Killer was executed but there's a copycat killer on the loose. Scott's character comes to believe that it's not a copycat killer but something beyond the natural and predenatural level.
Blatty's direction is sharp and taunt. He's obviously picked up a hint or two from William Friedekin (The Exorcist, French Connection)and Robert Wise (The Haunting, The Andromeda Strain). His use of silence creates added tension in a number of sequences. Blatty uses suspense vs. gore to create a charged atmosphere that allows the tension to build. His script is intelligent and fleshes out much of what was missing in the original film and novel of The Exorcist.
Scott gives a stunning, complex performance and Jason Miller's performance captures the mixture of terror and power his character feels given his circumstances. There really isn't a weak link in this fine, underrated and largely unseen film. By all rights the DVD edition should have a director's commentary. If Scott and Miller were around they'd also provide a fine commentary on their craft. Since that isn't possible, perhaps someone will ask Campbell Scott at some point to comment on his father's strong performance in this chiller.
The Exorcist 3 (along with another film Scott appeared in called The Changling)is a perfect example of what horror films should do;' they should not shock as much as build to a number of terrifying moments. THis is a DVD well worth having and proves that sometimes a sequel can be the equal to its original.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Scariest movie I've seen in a long time, November 27, 2005
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
Yes, yes, this certainly isn't much like the original 'The Exorcist'. (Nor is it like that spectacular turdburger 'The Heretic'.) If you want 'The Exorcist' maybe you should go watch that again. Personally, I like this movie better than the original, though they aren't all that comparable, and it's certainly one of the best horror movies of the 1990's.

This takes something more of a thriller approach, as it focuses on a policeman, Kinderman, played by George C. Scott, and a murder investigation. Still, it has a substantial supernatural angle and is undeniably a horror film. Most backers of this film call it a 'cerebral horror film'. I think that's a bit pretentious as it isn't really that this film is that smart, it's just slow and emphasizes dialogue. It's not so much smart as it is not merely shallow and extremely simplistic. Some dumb people may not care for it, but that would just be because they don't like something so low-key, rather than that they can't understand it. Anyway the film involves a series of brutal murders which are especially puzzling as they follow the MO of a killer who's been dead for over a decade, though they don't appear nearly as random as those did, and seem to be related to an exorcism many years earlier. Specifics beyond that are unnecessary.

Again, this is just the scariest film I've seen in a very long time. I've grown largely immune to film horror, though I enjoy it immensely, but this film got to me. It's not scary in the purely conventional sense as it is the dialogue scenes which tend to be the most unnerving parts. Brad Dourif plays the apparent killer, and he's brilliant with lots of magnificent dialogue. He's plays it about as intensely as you can with out going overboard and is really quite frightening. Unquestionably the creepiest 'movie psycho' I've ever seen. The generally low-key style of the film is broken at a few points, and these scenes are all the more effective because of how rare they are. (Up until the very end of the film, anyway)

George C. Scott is excellent as Kinderman, and the performances are uniformly strong, though there aren't many really substantiative parts. It is, of course, a dark, dank film but with a bit of visual flair at times as well, particularly during a fine, surreal sequence towards the beginning of the film. Again, it is slow, but that's the stuff that this film is about. Take it or leave it.

It does break the mood a bit at the end, which is quite a bit more conventional than all that which came before. It doesn't fit entirely but it's far from bad. It's still pretty effective all by itself, I think, just not as strong as that which came before. All in all, it doesn't stumble too much.

Well, I liked this a lot. Check it out if you want some truly dark, different horror.

Grade: A-
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Greenstate Pictures, December 29, 1999
By 
Timmy Busce (Cincinnati, New York) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
William Peter Blatty adapted the script for this second sequel of the Exorcist series, as he did the first. The story is very good, continuing the life of Lieutenant Kinderman and Father Dyer, after they witnessed the death of one of the exorcists in the first film. From the beginning, when the statue of Christ opens its eyes, the film is a chilling experience. It is more frightening in an atmospheric way than the first. It gives the presence of evil spirituality, a tangibility, a feeling that it has a density and dimension and is surrounding you. This exhertion can almost grant an interaction of the audience, that compells them to feel that some invisible presence has inherited the room they watch it in. The first Exorcist compelled and frightened by using straight-forward explicit imagery. Only an avid reader of Blatty's novels could fully understand the symbolism and subtlety of the dialogue. Scott was not the original Kinderman, nevertheless portrays the roll finely. As does Brad Dourif as the venemous Gemini Killer and Jason Miller as "Patient X." The film's specifically major flaw is the use of celebrity appearances such as Fabio, in a dream sequence of Kinderman. When there are first suggestions of this, one is prepared for it to be frightening to some extent, due to the boundryless potential of terror that can be incorporated in dream sequences. Yet, it is ultimatley a tryingly humorous scenario, and all fails within. The films ending is basically a re-enactment of the exorcism in the first film, and fails to produce a plot-twist, which is decidedly necessary to conclude the saga of evil patented by the Exorsist. On a technical gripe, the sound is relentlessly awkward, even in silent scenes without any background music. Ironically the sound editors of the first film won an Oscar for their work, it's safe to assume they had nothing to do with the soundtrack of this film. Overall, The Exorcist III is a very good sequel to the most horrifying film ever made. Those who find it anything less than that are comparing it too much to the predecessor.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Too Smart for Today's Typical Horror Crowd, April 4, 2002
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
Exorcist III is indeed one of the more underappreciated films in recent memory (another is Blatty's other directorial effort, the 9th Configuration). The mistake made here was one of marketing. In the studio hysteria to cash in on franchises, the boneheads marketing this fine picture attempted to sell it as another Jason, Freddy, Halloween, Scream, et al. What they failed to understand was that this was a THINKING PERSON'S horror film. I have low expectations for the 4th Exorcist presently in production without involvment from Friedkin or Blatty.
If you don't believe in God, what happens when you are face to face with the devil? This, simplistically, is the key theme in Exorcist III. It is thought provoking, horrific, and very suspenseful. There are no naked babysitters to be found, and none of the key characters are incredibly stupid. George C. Scott gives an incredible performance as the street hardened homicide detective who has seen it all...until now.
Definitely worth a rent/purchase. (I own the DVD and, unfortunately, there's no commentary by Blatty, although I'm on the lookout for a reissue.)
Perhaps today's generation of horror fan should consider this film. In a day where digital effects substitute fine writing and character development, this film illustates the most frightening horrors come from within.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Perhaps the most underrated sequel of all time, August 6, 2003
By 
Shawn Hunt (Charlotte, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
I'll be honest, I had ZERO expectations for this film. The second film the series was perhaps the most God awful film I've had the displeasure of sitting through. Then when this one came to theaters, it bombed both critcally and financially. Now, with the fourth one on the horizon, I thought I'd go back and catch up by watching this one. I have to say, I was totally taken aback after viewing this film. It was the first film to give me the chills in over fifteen years (and I've sat through more horror films than most die hard horror fans).
One scene in particular (one I wouldn't dream of giving away), completely caught me off guard with it's use of subtlety and eerie sound effects. There is little on screen gore, as William Peter Blatty (writer/director) has his characters describe everything in great detail through the dialouge. This leaves most of it to your imagination, which tends to be more horrific in the long run. Save for a few really chilling close ups, the direction is pretty straight forward. Most of it is of the point and shoot variety, which really disarms the viewer when Blatty decides to lay on the scares.
The acting also suprised me with George C. Scott turning in an emotional performance (slightly over played, but that's always been his style). The real show stopper would have to be Brad ("Child's Play")Dourif, playing yet another psychopath with his usual brilliance. The interplay between him and Scott in the cell room came across very shudder-some. It reminded me of the scenes with Foster and Hopkins in "Silence of the Lambs" (though one should point out this predated "Silence" by a year!).
If I have any complaints, I suppose the climax would have to be it. It's as if someone else came in and shot a different ending (which may the case for all I know). It feels like your suddenly watching someone else's film right at the most crucial moment. The other complaint would have to be the presentation on the DVD itself. The picture is a little hazy and it's pretty much a "bare bones" package, with no real special features.
That aside, this film is a definate must see for all those horror and mystery buffs who may have overlooked this gem back when it was first released. Very smart thriller, which probably would've done better had it been released under the title "Legion" (the novel which it was based on, also written by Blatty), than as the third in the "Exorcist" series. Don't get me wrong, this is a great follow up to "The Exorcist" and really the only sequel I would consider to it. But the film stands well on it's own and it's a shame so few ever gave it the time of day becuase of it's roman numeral in the title.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A largely unseen horror classic, March 24, 2003
By 
Thor Jonsson (Calgary, AB Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Exorcist III (DVD)
Ever since I first saw this film I have been absolutely in love with this movie. I typically rarely watch a movie more than every few years or not often over 3-5 times in my life.
I have probably seen this film over 30 times, and I can't get over how well done this whole film was. The acting is excellent, especially with Scott and Dourif. The thing that grabbed me most about the film was the mood of the film, it feels so creepy throughout. Its got such smart lighting, film shots, and great creepy sounds/noises that really add to the effect to keep you engrossed in the film.
Even the great dry humour in the film really adds to this experience.
Its unfortunate that the DVD is so bare bones and without any audio commentary. Hard core fans of this film have been waiting patiently for a quality DVD release of this film and it seems we will have to wait much longer.
A film like this doesn't come along often and for people who enjoy horror films this one is a must have for your collection.. If nothing else for the hospital scene that scares people like few scenes in horror have.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I ts a sequel that proves to be more than equal., June 20, 2009
By 
PearceReader (Los Angeles, Ca.) - See all my reviews
What I am going to say here may seem paradoxical to others that have written reviews for Exorcist 3. FLAT OUT: this is a better movie than the original that inspired it. Hows that?. The reasons for this are many, not the least of which is William Friedkin's influence on William Peter Blatty as a director and film maker. The atmosphere is creepy and absolutely immersive...it pulls you in. The performances by the actors involved are nothing less than extraordinary. The photography is great ..etc etc etc and on and on and on......The way in which this story picks up after the original is outstanding. But if you have seen the movie you already know all this. For those of you that have not yet seen Exorcist 3 all I can say is; watch it asap.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 218 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

The Exorcist III
The Exorcist III by William Peter Blatty (DVD - 1999)
$10.81
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.