Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

The Extraordinary Journeys: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Oxford World's Classics) Paperback – May 15, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0199539277 ISBN-10: 0199539278 Edition: 1st
Buy used
$2.78
Buy new
$10.42
Used & new from other sellers Delivery options vary per offer
74 used & new from $2.78
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Check out The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
$10.42 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

The Extraordinary Journeys: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Oxford World's Classics) + The Extraordinary Journeys: Around the World in Eighty Days (Oxford World's Classics) + Journey to the Centre of the Earth (Oxford World's Classics)
Price for all three: $29.08

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"by far the best translations/critical editions available ... known internationally as a topnotch scholar" --Science-Fiction Studies

About the Author

William Butcher is Lecturer at the Institute of Education and Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Hong Kong.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Oxford World's Classics
  • Paperback: 496 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (May 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199539278
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199539277
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 0.9 x 5.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #62,734 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By coolhand on June 27, 2013
Format: Paperback
There are three significant translations of this book, and amazon's lacklustre book-sorting system creates nothing but chaos when searching for the correct format / translation of this book. I'm here to help!

note: (find the version you are looking for with the ISBN numbers I've provided at the bottom of this review, you can just copy and paste them into the amazon search field and hit GO).

Here are excerpts from the three most common translations:

Paragraph one, translated by Mercier Lewis -
THE YEAR 1866 WAS signalized by a remarkable incident, a mysterious and inexplicable phenomenon, which doubtless no one has yet forgotten. Not to mention rumors which agitated the maritime population, and excited the public mind, even in the interior of continents, seafaring men were particularly excited. Merchants, common sailors, captains of vessels, skippers, both of Europe and America, naval officers of all countries, and the governments of several states on the two continents, were deeply interested in the matter.

Paragraph one, translated by Walter James Miller and Frederick Paul Walter (1996) -
THE YEAR 1866 was marked by a bizarre development, an unexplained and downright inexplicable phenomenon that surely no one has forgotten. Without getting into those rumors that upset civilians in the seaports and deranged the public mind even far inland, it must be said that professional seamen were especially alarmed. Traders, shipowners, captains of vessels, skippers, and master mariners from Europe and America, naval officers from every country, and at their heels the various national governments on these two continents, were all extremely disturbed by the business.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Eric Rachut on January 24, 2011
Format: Paperback
"Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Seas" was first translated into English by Parson Lewis Mercier (who used the name Mercier Lewis) in the 1870's - this is now public domain and is the version you will get with cut-rate editions.

Mr. Mercier eliminated a quarter of the text and mistranslated numerous words and measures.

The way to spot his translation and his influence in some later editions (not this one) is to open the book to the third chapter, where the servant Conseil is introduced and described as someone who always addresses his master in the third person singular. See if Conseil's inquiry to his master then actually uses the third person singular - "the master" - or if he uses second person singular - "you."

If it's "you," it is the inaccurate translation.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Wellman on May 24, 2012
Format: Paperback
Finished reading this and in the process I learned I had two misconceptions about this book.
First, I always thought the name was a singular "Sea" but in the original French title, it is indeed a plural. This makes sense when seen in light of the second misconception I had ...which is that the 20,000 leagues speaks to horizontal travel around the seas of the world (2.7 times the circumference to be exact) rather than what I had assumed it to mean...20,000 leagues deep (or vertical distance).
Being a classic piece of work written in the late 1800's, the pacing is very different and that may be offputting to some readers. It can be slow and tedious, particularly because it contains detailed decriptions of categorizations of animals and sea life. However, if it's approached more like a travel guide than a break pace thriller, it can be very enjoyable. I enjoyed little revelations (I never knew Capt Nemo's name had an alternate meaning) and the characters are fully developed and interesting. Like some of the best novels, not every detail is explained and many questions are left unanswered about the ship, Captain Nemo and their demise but I'm actually ok with the mystery of it. In all, I'm glad I read it but it's definitely not for every one.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By E. A Solinas HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
Submarines as we know them didn't exist in 1869. But Jules Verne had an almost eerily prophetic knack for knowing what technology would be used in the future -- and he put it to work in "20,000 Leagues Under The Sea," a slow-moving adventure tale with plenty of proto-steampunk and almost fantastical undersea life.

Ships in the middle of the ocean are suddenly seeing -- and being attacked by -- "a long object, spindle-shaped, occasionally phosphorescent, and infinitely larger and more rapid in its movements than a whale."

Eventually the US government sends out a ship to capture the object, and during a sea battle Professor Aronnax, his manservant Conseil and harpooner Ned Land go overboard. Soon they're picked up by the Nautilus, the vast submarine that has been causing all this trouble, and introduced to Captain Nemo -- an intelligent, charismatic man who belongs to no nation.

Aronnax becomes fascinated by Nemo, his ship and his library -- as well as the amazing underwater adventures that Nemo introduces them to, like pearl-hunting and fighting a giant squid. But the captain's free, lawless life has its dark side, and the three men begin to realize that they must get away from the Nautilus no matter what.

It's actually rather amazing that Jules Verne not only dreamed up the idea of a semi-modern submarine long before they existed, but thought out the applications, the stealth, and the vast size. And since nothing like the Nautilus existed at the time, there's a slightly fantastical, steampunk flavor to "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
Read more ›
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Extraordinary Journeys: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Oxford World's Classics)
This item: The Extraordinary Journeys: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea (Oxford World's Classics)
Price: $10.42
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com