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60 of 66 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Creepy Suspense Horror
Mun (Angelica Lee) is a girl who has had the misfortune of being blind since the age of two. When she undergoes a cornea transplant to restore her sight, both she and her family are overjoyed at the chance for Mun to see again. When Mun begins to see odd shadows and vague, blurry images, it is difficult to discern at first whether or not this is a mere side effect of...
Published on June 11, 2004 by CreepyT

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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Depends on what you're looking for in a horror film.
If it's important for you to have jump-out-of-your-skin scares and lots of gory violence, you can pass on "The Eye." But if you savor a creepy and atmospheric film, this is worth a look. It's pretty formulaic: A woman, blind since the age of 2, gets a corneal transplant and can see again. But it turns out that the corneas came from a woman with the gift of clairvoyance...
Published on October 22, 2004 by C. ANZIULEWICZ


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60 of 66 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Creepy Suspense Horror, June 11, 2004
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This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
Mun (Angelica Lee) is a girl who has had the misfortune of being blind since the age of two. When she undergoes a cornea transplant to restore her sight, both she and her family are overjoyed at the chance for Mun to see again. When Mun begins to see odd shadows and vague, blurry images, it is difficult to discern at first whether or not this is a mere side effect of the surgery. Clearly, her eyes need time to readjust to their surroundings, and her brain time to accept and interpret this new information.
Once Mun leaves the hospital and arrives home, it becomes clear that something is terribly wrong. Her room constantly changes, and she not only sees, but also has conversations with the recently departed. Mun, traumatized by these images and living in a constant state of anxiety, retreats for a while back into the dark world she was familiar with for most of her life. After some coaxing from her therapist, Dr. Wah, (Lawrence Chou), who eventually believes that there is more to her story than meets the eye (no pun intended), Mun realizes that she needs to face her fears and this new way of life. Of course, the fact that Mun's therapist sees her as something more than a mere patient only serves to help Mun's cause. Together the two set out to understand these images and their meanings. Does Mun only perceive things differently due to the fact that her "visual vocabulary" is under-developed? Or has she inherited an unexpected "gift" from her cornea donor?
"The Eye" is everything a suspenseful horror/thriller movie should be. Though this film, at many times, highly resembles "The Sixth Sense," the Pang brothers have managed to put their own unique twist on the story. Using subtleties and ambiance rather than expensive effects and visuals, this film conveys a truly inimitable sense of spooky, inescapable claustrophobia. This film trades the in-your-face horror for dark, atmospheric suspense, and the result is highly effective.
The eerie combination of music, cinematography, and an outstanding performance by Angelica Lee will have you cringing in your seat as you watch this film and are placed into Mun's less-than-idyllic and feverishly surreal world. This tension created early on in the film is maintained at a deliberate and methodical pace all the way up to the explosive finale that is not soon to be forgotten.
It will be interesting to see what is done with this film when Tom Cruise's American remake comes out, as this version of the film will certainly be difficult to beat. Grab some popcorn, turn out the lights, and enjoy this incredible film!
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37 of 40 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Depends on what you're looking for in a horror film., October 22, 2004
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
If it's important for you to have jump-out-of-your-skin scares and lots of gory violence, you can pass on "The Eye." But if you savor a creepy and atmospheric film, this is worth a look. It's pretty formulaic: A woman, blind since the age of 2, gets a corneal transplant and can see again. But it turns out that the corneas came from a woman with the gift of clairvoyance. You can figure out the rest. The story plays out in a fairly predictable way .... but there is one unexpected climactic scene that really blew me away and took the story to a whole new level. It's the grisly aftermath of this scene that is so unsettling and moves "The Eye" into R-rated territory. This movie requires a little bit of patience, but the payoff is pretty satisfying.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great movie!, August 26, 2006
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This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
Great movie. It's fantastic visuals, it's got edge of your seat shock, but most importantly it's got a great storyline. That is what sets the Pang Brother movies apart from other horror movies. The blood and violence aren't necessarily gratuitous, but it's appropriate. The movie gets to you on two level: visually and mentally. Occasionally there a movie makers who by name alone (like hitchcock) you know you're going to get a good movie. I'll be bold enough to say that the Pang Brothers not only try to surpass Hitchcock, but the also do so with great success. I'll watch their movies sight/review unseen simply because I know what to expect. Great visuals and an even greater "life-affirming" beautifully disguised as horror.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Yet another way-above-average Asian horror flick., December 22, 2003
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
The Eye (The Pang Brothers, 2002)
In case you were thinking about entering the World's Coolest Name contest, don't bother. Oxide Pang has the title sewn up. He also, along with his brother Danny, makes very interesting films out of a studio in Hong Kong. First coming to Western attention with the crime thriller Bangkok Dangerous a few years ago, the twins came up with a horror film this time. And it's one of the best horror films to come down the pike in a long time.
Mun, a blind girl (Angelica Lee, who caught Western attention a couple of years back in Betelnut Beauty), has a cornea transplant to restore her sight. While in the process of recovery, she starts seeing things that don't quite gel with reality. After she regains focus, she comes to realize what she's seeing is not exactly what's out there. Not just ghosts (though the movie has its share of those, a la The Sixth Sense), but places and things that aren't actually around her. Her therapist, Dr. Wah (Lawrence Chou, not familiar to Western audiences yet. Give him time), half thinks she's nuts, half wants to get her into bed, so he goes along with her attempts to track down the donor of her corneas and find out what happened to the person.
Slick, eerie, and chock full of tension, The Eye is exactly what thrillers are supposed to be. There is a lot of The Sixth Sense in this movie, but the punches are delivered more deftly; the movie contains the best jump-out-of-your-seat scene since the cat came flying through the window at the beginning of Friday the 13th Part 2 twenty years ago. Asian directors also seem immune to the silly emotionally manipulative tricks American directors are so fond of pulling, and the Pang brothers are no exception; they have a story, they want to tell it, and the emotion will come out (though sometimes awkwardly, as when Wah's uncle confronts him about his intentions towards Mun).
Apart from such unintentionally funny moments as this, The Eye is a wonderful little supernatural thriller. Very highly recommended. ****
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Who's that creeping through my Window?, October 28, 2004
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
Imagine for a moment that you've been blind since the age of two, submerged in a world of darkness. You crave, hunger for, the simplest, most elementary of optical stimulation.

Then, one day, you are the lucky beneficiary of a highly experimental corneal operation. You see the glorious colors of a world that for far too long was lost in the inky black. Buildings, interiors of rooms, the golden infinity of a sunrise, human faces---all of these things that have been denied you for more than a decade. There's one catch.

Now, you see the Dead. Worse still, you see the Unquiet Dead---and those dark-shrouded, pale-faced creatures of Darkness sent to collect them and shepherd them to their final resting place.

In a sentence, "The Eye" is about those dark, skulking, cold-skinned dead things that most of us (mercifully) can't see. Our heroine Mun(played sympathetically by Malay rocker Angelica Lee) regains her sight, but there's a downside. With vision comes horrific visions of the Dead: a whining boy wondering if Mun has seen his report card, an elderly man standing stiff in the middle of a Hong Kong highway, a disfigured phantom floating in the elevator car.

There is a mystery at the center of "The Eye", but in truth the exposition and detective-work required to explain it weakens the impact of the film, which at its dark heart is a long twisted song to the horror that hides in the closet and sleeps underneath the bed of terrified children. Mun and her psychotherapist Dr. Wah (played with aplomb by the youthful Lawrence Chou) are quick to depart on a mystery-hunt that takes them to the wilds of Thailand, but the mystery itself isn't the attraction here: quite the contrary, the ghoulish spooky delights found in "The Eye" beg not to be explained.

For most of the film's running time, the Pang Brothers defy explanation, preferring to steep the viewer in the movie's delicious, ghoulishly creepy atmosphere. But as with most Asian horror, an explanation must always be tendered, and this one doesn't serve the film's shivery nature: the resolution is disappointing, particularly given the terrors that preceded it.

That said, "The Eye" is the first film in years to have genuinely creeped me out. The scene in an apartment elevator car is by itself worth the price of admission. "The Eye" doesn't pack the same brutal whallop of terror provided by films like "Ringu" and "Ju-On", but it's a shivery and competently executed little chiller on its own terms. Watched in total darkness in an empty house on a rainy night, the effect of "The Eye" is equivalent to having walked into your closet, confident nothing but your clothes resides there, only to feel a graveyard-cold hand brush against your face.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, July 29, 2006
A Kid's Review
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
This is a well made movie, props to the Pang brothers. Its not terribly scary but theres certainly some tense, chilling moments in the movie. The ending is kinda weak, I didn't dig the hurrah everything is well and laid to rest end...coulda gotten more creative and crazy there.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredibly creepy and unnerving, August 16, 2006
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
While reading up on scenes that made people jump, one that often came up was 2 from the Eye, a Japanese film made a couple of years ago. Going to the video store, I thought "I doubt they'd have it but let me go look for it anyway" and sure enough I found it so I got that and didn't regret it one bit. While the story isn't original and it kind of peters out after awhile, it's anchored by a solid performance and genuinely creepy moments throughout the film.

Mun has been blind since the age of 2. In her late 10's/early 20's(it's never specified), she undergoes a cornea transplant, letting her see finally. And everything is great and she's quite excited over it. That is until weird people start showing up and freaking her out which makes her wonder: just whose eyes did she get? Helping her is a psychiatrist who wants to believe her but is burdened by his more-than-friends feelings for her.

The film isn't that original as there have been several films based around being in possession of a haunted something. The film is of course to get comparisons to the Sixth Sense but that's an incredibly unfair statement since besides the ghost and the psychiatrist thing, they're quite different. The only thing that the Eye doesn't share with Sixth Sense is strong scenes start to finish. You can almost pinpoint where this film goes from creepy to just kind of there. The ending, which rivals the Mothman Prophecies for the biggest end disaster I've seen, is effective and a nice capper.

Now, it is a horror film so does it scare you? It sure can. Of note are 2 particular scenes: Mun gets a creepy visitation during a calligraphy class and what's probably the creepiest elevator ride you'll be on. Also watch for a face on a subway that has actually not been accounted for. These scenes, as well as a hallway visit by an old woman will most likely chill you, or at least startle you cause the music's so loud. However at a certain point, the film becomes less creepy and becomes more story driven and it's here where it kind of falls apart.

The other anchor is Anjelica Lee(credited as Lee Sin-Je) who provides a strong emotional weight to the character where you'll start to worry about her safety(especially that elevator part). The only other significant role is her doctor friend who while not given much character, becomes someone Mun can rely on for help.

In another unnecessary remake idea, it's being redone with Renee Zellweger in the role of Mun. While the last half can need some touching up, this doesn't need to be remade: it's creepy enough as it is.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 5/5, January 12, 2005
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This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
First of all, if you are looking for a crazy/all out/gore-packed/horror movie, step away from this one because you will not get any of that. However, if you are a fan of really creepy/under the skin/horror flicks, then you might be in for a little treat. The only thing that might set you back is the fact that this flick is almost like a combination of the Sixth Sense and Mothman Prophecies. Who ripped off who is not for me to say, or hey.. this just might be a coincidence. I cannot really tell, all I can say is that I lucked out and saw this flick before it was released.

The Eye is about a young blind girl named Mun who gets a cornea transplant which returns her sight that she has once lost. Shortly after she discovers that she is seeing a little bit more than she should, to be exact, she starts to see ghosts. Of course everyone is skeptical about what she tells them she sees because they all think that her eyes are just adjusting and that this is only a little glitch. However, Mun decides that she this is not something ordinary and that she has to solve this mystery that is haunting her on daily/nightly basis. She begins an investigation and tries to solve the puzzle of the death of her corneas' former owner who met her demise a long ago.

The film focuses roughly on getting under your skin, none of the in your face gorific elements are here to be seen. Only pure creepiness that is often too slow for an average movie goer. The first ten minutes of this movie is roughly what I am talking about. They are very creepy and it sets a great mood for the remainder of the movie. Although the people I went to see this flick with weren't too pleased with it, I think they'd still agree that this flick had a certain degree of creepiness to it that deserves to be mentioned, or seen
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chilly stuff here!, December 29, 2004
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
Including "The Eye," I can think of only a handful of ghost films that are actually scary. "The Changeling" comes to mind, as does "The Woman in Black" and "The Ring." Beyond those three--there might be one or two more--I'm having trouble coming up with further examples. Maybe "The Sixth Sense" counts for some people, but it ultimately fell short of the mark. There is something about Hollywood and ghosts that often doesn't work. Maybe Tinseltown's reliance on massive special effects and dumbed down scripts precludes them from grasping the subtle nuances necessary to achieve real chills. Having a guy wearing a hockey mask and carrying a machete jump out of a dark closet might elicit a jump or two, but it's a far cry from the feeling you get watching that ball bounce down the stairs in "The Changeling." Perhaps the fact that "The Eye" doesn't come from Hollywood accounts for its success. Whatever the case, this little film made by Oxide and Danny Pang is one heck of a rollercoaster ride. It's a deeply frightening movie that keeps the scares coming fast and furious, through both ghostly apparitions and sudden plot changes. No wonder Hollywood keeps buying up the rights to these Asian horror movies.

Mun (Angelica Lee) is an attractive young lady suffering from blindness. She's been blind since a very young age, but makes the most of a bad situation. Mun's disability does not hinder her life in significant ways; she plays a musical instrument with an all-blind symphony orchestra and gets along quite well with her grandmother and her beautiful if slightly icy airline stewardess sister. All of this is about to change, however, when an operation restores Mun's eyesight. What a wonderful, heartwarming story, right? Wrong. The nightmare begins as soon as the bandages come off. Mun starts seeing hazy figures that appear and disappear in the blink of an eye, and that's just for starters. As her vision improves she comes to the conclusion that she's seeing ghosts. She sees some in the hospital while she strikes up a friendship with a young cancer patient, she sees them in the hallway outside her room, and she sees them in her grandmother's apartment building. Mun also suffers from intense flashbacks of scenes she never witnessed herself, but it's the ghosts that reduce her to a shambling wreck. No one else notices these apparitions, let alone hears them like Mun does, and she begins to suffer from depression. Concerned that something about the operation didn't go well, Mun begins visiting a psychologist named Dr. Wah (Lawrence Chou) in an effort to get to the bottom of her affliction.

Wah initially expresses skepticism about Mun's claims, but in predictable movie fashion falls in love with the young lady. He agrees to help his charge uncover the mystery behind the sightings, not an easy task considering that the two must track down the person who donated the corneas for Mun's operation. Sure enough, the story behind the donation reeks of supernatural overtones. It turns out that Mun sports the corneas of a young psychic who lived in a small Thai village. None of the people in the hamlet liked the girl because her visions often foretold ominous events. Whenever a child passed away or a disaster unfolded, it would happen a few days after this girl talked about it. You would think after awhile the people would start listening to her, but such is not the case when superstition is involved. The other kids picked on this girl mercilessly, so much so that she decided to take her own life. Now Mun must figure out a way to purge the girl's gift and memory from her eyes. Is such a thing possible? It sure looks that way after Mun takes a stand in the girl's old bedroom. But things aren't as easy as they seem in "The Eye," and the viewer learns this after watching the massively disturbing conclusion. It would seem that accepting what life throws your way is sometimes better than trying to change it.

"The Eye" is a frightening film indeed. I think the movie scared me as much as it did because I kept putting myself in Mun's place. I can't even begin to imagine how utterly devastating it would be to regain your sight only to go through the things Mun witnesses. Remember, this is a person who has no memories of what the world looks like. The choice of Angelica Lee to play the lead character was a good one; she exudes a sort of innocence that is perfect for a person regaining their vision. That innocence soon turns to horror when the spirits turn up to torment her, and the various spirits Mun encounters are the best thing going for "The Eye." You just never know when they'll turn up. The most horrifying vision occurs when Mun practices her writing skills, with the floating spirit in the elevator pulling a close second. The filmmakers handle these scenes with great flair, allowing the camera plenty of time to capture the horror felt by Mun as the fear courses through her veins. An empty elevator never looked this ominous before!

The DVD comes with several extras, including trailers for "The Housekeeper," "Morvern Callar," and several from a series called "The Director's Label." A trailer for the film, a television spot, and an informative making of documentary flesh out the disc. Many of the behind the scenes featurettes on these discs bore me, but I liked the one here. It was neat to see how they pulled off the fiery finale. "The Eye" is yet another Asian horror film Hollywood plans on remaking sometime in the future. Let's hope against hope that they do this version justice.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better then the Sixth Sense!, October 19, 2003
This review is from: The Eye (DVD)
I was totally blown away by this movie. i watched it because it sounded interesting and i love horro movie.s it sounded like the sixth sense but this is far and away better then the sixth sense!
Its about a blind girl who receives a transplant and gets her sight. although when she gets her sight she begins seeing ghosts. she doesnt know this for awhile because shes never had sight and doesnt know teh difference of what is real and not real. and the ending is a shocker. this is one i would watch a few times and recommend to friends. the acting direction and score were all excellant. recommend this movie to friends. hopefully people will not ignore it just becasue it ahs subtitles!
if you get a chance watch this gem of a movie.
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The Eye
The Eye by Oxide Pang Chun (DVD - 2003)
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