The Eye of the Storm 2012 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

Available in HD
(13) IMDb 6.1/10
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Elizabeth Hunter controls all in her life - society, her staff, her children; but the once great beauty will now determine her most defiant act as she chooses her time to die.

Starring:
Charlotte Rampling, Maria Theodorakis
Runtime:
1 hour, 59 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Fred Schepisi
Starring Charlotte Rampling, Maria Theodorakis
Supporting actors Geoffrey Rush, Jamie Timony, Judy Davis, Bob Marcs, Alexandra Schepisi, John Gaden, Helen Morse, Robyn Nevin, Jane Menelaus, Bille Brown, Heather Mitchell, Simon Stone, Nikki Shiels, Louise Siversen, Colin Friels, May Lloyd, Dustin Clare, Martin Lynes
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

3.1 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 11, 2012
Format: Amazon Instant Video
THE EYE OF THE STORM has so much going for it that it seems a shame that it likely will not draw audiences in the theaters now that it has been released in this country. Thanks to Amazon's Video on Demand it can be watched in the home without the usual distractions of the theater audience more interested in texting and eating than in being willing to follow a strong story for two hours. It is another jewel of a film from Australia and perhaps in art houses it will be appreciated.
The story is adapted by Judy Morris from the Nobel Prize winning novel by Patrick White (1912 -1990), an Australian author who is widely regarded as one of the most important English-language novelists of the 20th century. White's fiction employs humor, florid prose, shifting narrative vantage points and a stream of consciousness technique. In 1973, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, the only Australian to have been awarded the prize. `The Eye of the Storm' is the ninth published novel by Patrick White and it is regarded as one of his best novels.

The elderly Elizabeth Hunter (Charlotte Rampling), widow of a wealthy grazier, is nearing the end of her days in some splendor in her mansion in Sydney, Australia, and her two children have been summoned to her bedside. Her son Basil (Geoffrey Rush), once a leading actor on the London stage whose career is now in decline and her daughter Dorothy (Judy Davis), the ex-wife of a minor French aristocrat whose fractured marriage has ended with her only asset being the retention of her title of Princess, are motivated more by their possible inheritance than affection for the old lady.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Sheryl Fechter on September 14, 2012
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Widowed Elizabeth Hunter (Charlotte Rampling) is lying ill in bed, adorning herself and awaiting the arrival of her two children, Basil (Geoffrey Rush), and Dorothy (Judy Davis), who do not show up on time for good reason. They each have deep feelings still remaining about their dysfunctional childhood and bitter feelings toward their caustic mother.

This acerbic cast is directed by Fred Schepisi, from the adapted screenplay penned by Judy Morris and coming from Patrick White's Nobel Prize-winning novel. This picture provides arresting photography along with an occasional, almost poetic, narrative interjected from an in character Geoffrey Rush.

Dorothy is the first to arrive late at the estate in Sydney Australia. She is immediately uncomfortable with her mother as Elizabeth begins to censure her in a most berating manner. Dorothy is now divorced from her aristocratic French husband who left her without anything material from the marriage but for her official title of "Princess".

Discernibly flagrant Basil arrives fashionably late, in fact, it is the next day as he explodes through the front door with flowers in tow. He begins his obvious flattery of his mother who sees right through it and is just as degrading concerning him. Basil is mainly a Shakespearean stage actor on his way out although still well known and a charmer with the ladies. He has been knighted with the title of "Sir". Dorothy and Basil don't realize until they each arrive just how ill Elizabeth is with dementia.

She drifts in and out of lucidity then at times not even recognizing her own children and also her hired staff; a middle-aged, deeply religious nurse along with a younger promiscuous nurse named Flora. These two women dote on her.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By April McWilliams on January 20, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
The Eye of the Storm is one of the best films. A stellar cast that deserves accolades. I'm quite stunned that it did not receive an Oscar nod for best picture. A must see...add it to your collection.
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Patrick White's novels seem virtually unfilmable but this one emerges with a certain gravitas and dignity. A powerhouse cast of course helps. Take it for a comedy and you'll have better luck with it than if it was viewed as high drama. It's a bit of a muddle really though. Fred Schepisi's films are always worth watching. I suspect that this one would repay multiple viewings. Judy Davis is the standout here.
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This is a very good film although no one will see it, most likely. Great performances all around, with a bit of a surprise ending. A very rich, self-absorbed is dying, and her children and servants try to keep her happy and alive so that THEY can survive.
Great performances, meaningful film.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By addison de witt on January 15, 2015
Format: Amazon Instant Video
What went wrong here is anyone's guess, but to say that this is an all - star Aussie turkey is the understatement of the year. There are two glaring problems however, that stand out. Geoffrey Rush and Judy Davis, camping it up like two old queens are both way too old to be playing the children of Charlotte Rampling, who despite some dreadful aging makeup, is in fact around about the same age as they are. The story is a good one, and apart from some terrible fake backgrounds the film looks quite good. But the performances are terrible. Helen Morse as a demented housekeeper is so bad, it's just not funny. And for a Sydneysider, the attempt to piece together various location shots to convince us we're in Sydney fail miserably. The best performance comes from Fred Schepsi's daughter as a young nurse. It's a mess.
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