Start reading The Fair Tax Book on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

The Fair Tax Book [Kindle Edition]

Neal Boortz , John Linder
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,628 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $14.99
Kindle Price: $9.78
You Save: $5.21 (35%)
Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 69%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $9.78  
Hardcover --  
Paperback $10.67  
Audible Audio Edition, Abridged $15.95 or Free with Audible 30-day free trial
Kindle eTextbooks
Save up to 80% with Kindle eTextbooks
Textbooks cost less when you rent or buy feature-rich eTextbooks. With flexible rental options, only pay for the time you need. Choose a rental length between 30 and 360 days and extend it for as little as one day. You even have the option to purchase at any time. Learn more.

Book Description

Wouldn't you love to abolish the IRS ...
Keep all the money in your paycheck ...
Pay taxes on what you spend, not what you earn ...
And eliminate all the fraud, hassle, and waste of our current system?

Then the FairTax is for you. In the face of the outlandish American tax burden, talk-radio firebrand Neal Boortz and Congressman John Linder are leading the charge to phase out our current, unfair system and enact the FairTax Plan, replacing the federal income tax and withholding system with a simple 23 percent retail sales tax on new goods and services. This dramatic revision of the current system, which would eliminate the reviled IRS, has already caught fire in the American heartland, with more than six hundred thousand taxpayers signing on in support of the plan.

As Boortz and Linder reveal in this first book on the FairTax, this radical but eminently sensible plan would end the annual national nightmare of filing income tax returns, while at the same time enlarging the federal tax base by collecting sales tax from every retail consumer in the country. The FairTax, they argue, would transform the fearsome bureaucracy of the IRS into a more transparent, accountable, and equitable tax collection system. Among other benefits, it will:

  • Make America's tax code truly voluntary, without reducing revenue
  • Replace today's indecipherable tax code with one simple sales tax
  • Protect lower-income Americans by covering the tax on basic necessities
  • Eliminate billions of dollars in embedded taxes we don't even know we're paying
  • Bring offshore corporate dollars back into the U.S. economy

Endorsed by scores of leading economists and supported by a huge and growing grassroots movement, the FairTax Plan could revolutionize the way America pays for itself. In this straight-talking book, Neal Boortz and John Linder show you how it would work—and how you can help make it happen.



Editorial Reviews

About the Author

The host of radio's The Neal Boortz Show, syndicated in nearly two hundred national markets, Neal Boortz is the author (with Congressman John Linder) of the New York Times bestsellers The FairTax Book and FairTax: The Truth, and author of The Terrible Truth About Liberals. He has been nominated twice for the National Association of Broadcasters' Marconi Award and divides his time between Atlanta, Georgia, and Naples, Florida.



Congressman John Linder (R-Ga) is a longtime champion of tax reform and the primary sponsor of the FairTax Act. He divides his time between Duluth, Georgia, and Washington, D.C.


Product Details

  • File Size: 276 KB
  • Print Length: 224 pages
  • Publisher: HarperCollins e-books; Reprint edition (March 17, 2009)
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FCKC60
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #406,862 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
816 of 910 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beware of false reviews August 2, 2005
By JD
Format:Hardcover
It is obvious that Wealthy American and Rational Georgian did not actually read this book before the entered their review.

After reading this book, I am amazed at how simple the idea really is. Do away with payroll taxes and the price of the item you are buying will drop. The idea of embedded taxes that we are paying under the current system never even came to mind before. I, as the end user, have to pay the payroll tax cost of every vender that touches that item. That cost is a pretty significant part of the total cost of the product. Harvard studies are showing 21% and higher depending on the item.

On top of getting rid of the embedded tax, I end up getting more in my paycheck and I get a pre-bate for the cost of living. Where is the negative? I started to some research on line to find out and have yet to find any real negative. I found plenty of false propaganda from those that have not fully reviewed the plan, but no substantiated negative.

The book itself is well written and easy to understand. My hats off to both John Linder and Neal Boortz to taking a pretty complex subject and making it so easy to understand.

I would recommend this book to anyone that is interested in the tax code and ideas on how we can change it.
Was this review helpful to you?
97 of 106 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Step 1: Read Book. Step 2: Review Book August 3, 2005
Format:Hardcover
It is truly amazing how people critize this book without having any knowledge of the subject. They see the words "Neal Boortz", "Fair Tax" and immediately assume that this is some soak-the-poor, evil rich manipulation scheme.

READ THE BOOK FIRST! Every argument raised by critics on this site has been addressed, some from many different angles. One concept which MUST be understood and is clearly explained in the book: embedded taxes. For the critic "BushHater" (what a surprise), the concept if embedded taxes and how it affects the price of products is completely lost.

Maybe this example will help you, BushHater...let's say you grow peaches. A new President is elected who hates peaches and convinces congress to pass a 20% tax on all income derived from the production and sale of peaches. What do you think you would do, BH? Would you just say, "Thanks, government! Please take more of my money!" No...you would RAISE THE PRICE OF PEACHES to help cover the new tax burden with which you were saddled. You would also pay a tax advisor to find a way around paying that 20% increase in taxes -- more money out of your pocket. Do you get it yet? That is happening RIGHT NOW -- to the tune of 22% of what you purchase. Take away the income tax and that 22% is NOT NEEDED. And if you think the evil corporations will just pocket that extra money you know nothing about capitalism and competitive markets. Add back in the 23% sales tax and it is a wash. Oh, except that YOU get to keep ALL of your check, you get a monthly prebate check to cover the sales tax on essential products, you are not taxed on what you save, you do not pay SS or medicare taxes, etc.

It is a perfect system? No, there is no perfect tax system. But it is the best out there, it is VERY fair, and is sure beats the current system. Read the book. Understand the concept. See how concerns are addressed. Then, and only then, can you honestly review the topic.
Was this review helpful to you?
139 of 155 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Response to previously listed objections August 3, 2005
Format:Hardcover
The eight objections listed in a review by Edgar C Sparks can be easily shot down, one at a time, and with very little difficulty (logical thinking and comprehension of sarcasm is required to understand any of the following:)

1. Opens us up to electronic money and total tracking of our monetary positions.

What exactly is "electronic money"? Is "electronic money" worth the same as paper money? If it is, than I don't really give a damn. Oh, and you don't what the government tracking monetary positions (nor do I). So I guess you'd rather just keep on filling out those income tax returns, thereby helping the government do just that. Under the fair tax there is no reporting of income, accumulated wealth or assets, so what exactly are you talking about?

2. Puts us all, everyone, on the Welfare roles.

Ok, I assume you are speaking of the refund on taxes paid for the basic necessities of life. Do you express feelings of dissatification and complain bitterly everytime you receive an income tax refund? I guess now it is "welfare" for the government you give us back some of our own money. This is, by the way, a much simpler way of relieving the tax burden on basic necessities, for those who can afford it or not (thereby making it fair), than exempting specific items making way for corruption of the tax code by special interest groups (which is what we have now). So the next time the federal government sends you a "welfare check" after you pay too much income tax, go ahead and send it back.

3. Quotes the wrong tax rate. It is 30%, not 23% of purchases.

Do you quote your income taxes using the same formula? If so then someone in a 15% tax braket is actually paying 20%.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
37 of 39 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars support for fair tax August 16, 2005
Format:Hardcover
I've read the fair tax book and find that it is the most logical replacement for our present tax system. I don't get too excited when I read about what this economist said or that economist said. It's hard to get two economist to agree on anything. I have a B.S. is Business and Economics and a J.D. with an emphasis in business and corporate law.

Simply put, while the Fair Tax plan has its flaws, it has far fewer flaws than our present tax system. Even tax professionals, Tax lawyers, Tax courts, and the IRS cannot always agree on many provisions of the current tax law that the common citizen is tasked with compliance. To say that the Fair Tax plan has some flaws so therefore should be scrapped before it's put into place, is the mind set of the obstructionist and the stupid.

I've read many of the reviews that are critical of the Fair Tax plan and it's obvious the writers have no clue as to the true cost of doing business in America. Don't ask a bookeeper, ask a cost accountant the cost of tax compliance in todays business.

For the wage earner, how many times have you said or heard said that it's no use to work overtime because the government will just eat up the extra earnings in more taxes making the extra work not worth the effort?

For those who would reject the Fair Tax plan because of the few flaws, I would ask them, do you prefer our present system? Suppose we were currently under a tax system like the Fair Tax plan, would you favor replacing it with a tax plan that is like the current IRS tax code?

I've read many reviews that state that the poor are already paying a majority of the taxes and the rich are paying almost no tax.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
This book needs to be required reading by EVERY high school and college student!
Published 4 hours ago by Jamie Wheeler
5.0 out of 5 stars If you spend money, you pay taxes
How much is the IRS costing all of us??? THAT is coming out of the tax revenues!!!
Everyone pays taxes up to their ability to spend money in this tax concept. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Eclectic
1.0 out of 5 stars Fairtax Sounds Great because its Political Theater -- not a tax plan
Fairtax book sounds great, because that's what frauds do, they SOUND great.

I was fooled too, till I asked a few questions and looked for the research. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Mark D. Curran
5.0 out of 5 stars Great read!
We definitely need to scrap our present incomprehensible and tax system. This would be a comprehensive, and fair replacement .
Published 2 months ago by maureen
5.0 out of 5 stars Fair Tax Book
Excellent product and service. Enjoying the book, will continue to use Amazon for different things at different times. A secure way to shop.
Published 4 months ago by Susan
5.0 out of 5 stars Let's do this
One of the most important challenges facing this republic is replacing the IRS.
The FairTax plan would make life for all Americans better, while reducing the size of... Read more
Published 4 months ago by Bob
4.0 out of 5 stars Boortz made me a believer
Boortz made me a believer. I am convinced that the "fair tax" would solve many of our problems, and more and more politicians have come on board with it. Read more
Published 5 months ago by Karl F. Kuhn Sr.
5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Boortz!
This book is classic Boortz at his best. The facts of the Fair Tax are broken down so they are easier to understand and the myths that the proggies like to spread are busted.
Published 5 months ago by curly medic
5.0 out of 5 stars why not pay taxes?
who doesnt love the fair tax book? neal boortz tells it like it is in this classic. go buy it and enjoy.
Published 5 months ago by mjs
5.0 out of 5 stars How would they enforce Obamacare, for example. It is currently done...
The Fair Tax Book
(1995)

As a retired Certified Public Accountant (ICPA), and as a constituent of the Congressman before he retired and a listener to Boortz on WSB... Read more
Published 6 months ago by Gunner
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Forums

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Topic From this Discussion
Which book should I read?
@Sides
Both books are frauds or hoaxes designed to fool the gullible. Don't be a gullible fool, don't buy either.
IF the book is in your library then borrow it.
President Bush rejected it in 2005, Mitt Romney rejected it in 2012. It violates the US Constitution, which does not allow a national...
Dec 17, 2012 by Acute Observer |  See all 4 posts
Ridiculous!
Since when should Americans just roll over and play dead? If something is so bad isn't it worth fighting to change it. Here is a serious question for you, do you think African Americans from the early 1800's thought they would have the rights they currently have? I think you get the jist of where... Read More
Feb 14, 2006 by Will |  See all 25 posts
Tell Everyone
Linda, I share your concern about regressive taxes. For example, currently social security tax totaling 6.2% from the employee and another 6.2% from the employer (12.4% total) are paid by everyone down to the poorest working people in America. This tax is capped to about the first $90,000 of... Read More
Nov 28, 2005 by Eli |  See all 11 posts
Delete the unrelated negative reviews
That so-called "FairTax" is a fraud and swindles you out of some of your pay. If you didn't understand the book, read the 'Money' magazine story for Oct 2005.
The Bill of RIghts (9th and 10th) limit the Federal Govt. to what is in the Constitution, that is why we never had a national... Read More
Dec 8, 2012 by Acute Observer |  See all 3 posts
too bad
That so-called "FairTax" is a fraud and swindles you out of some of your pay. If you didn't understand the book, read the 'Money' magazine story for Oct 2005.
The Bill of RIghts (9th and 10th) limit the Federal Govt. to what is in the Constitution, that is why we never had a national... Read More
Dec 8, 2012 by Acute Observer |  See all 3 posts
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 




Look for Similar Items by Category