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The Fall of Rome: And the End of Civilization [Kindle Edition]

Bryan Ward-Perkins
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Why did Rome fall?

Vicious barbarian invasions during the fifth century resulted in the cataclysmic end of the world's most powerful civilization, and a 'dark age' for its conquered peoples. Or did it? The dominant view of this period today is that the 'fall of Rome' was a largely peaceful transition to Germanic rule, and the start of a positive cultural transformation.

Bryan Ward-Perkins encourages every reader to think again by reclaiming the drama and violence of the last days of the Roman world, and reminding us of the very real horrors of barbarian occupation. Attacking new sources with relish and making use of a range of contemporary archaeological evidence, he looks at both the wider explanations for the disintegration of the Roman world and also the consequences for the lives of everyday Romans, in a world of economic collapse, marauding barbarians,
and the rise of a new religious orthodoxy. He also looks at how and why successive generations have understood this period differently, and why the story is still so significant today.


Editorial Reviews

Review


"Imaginative and intensely interesting"--Chistopher Kelly, University of Cambridge


"An important addition to the study of this period of Western history."--Library Journal


"The author makes a compelling case for his point of view and thus helps readers restudy and rethink a major period in world history.... Explains the complex realities of the Roman empire and its neighbors in fascinating detail."--BookPage


Review


"Imaginative and intensely interesting"--Chistopher Kelly, University of Cambridge


"An important addition to the study of this period of Western history."--Library Journal


"The author makes a compelling case for his point of view and thus helps readers restudy and rethink a major period in world history.... Explains the complex realities of the Roman empire and its neighbors in fascinating detail."--BookPage



Product Details

  • File Size: 2693 KB
  • Print Length: 252 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0192807285
  • Publisher: OUP Oxford (June 23, 2005)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B006OYD2K6
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #251,114 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
191 of 202 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Manslaughter; not murder! September 17, 2005
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
"The invaders were not guilty of murder, but they had committed manslaughter." So says Bryan Ward-Perkins in an entertaining and stimulating historical monograph. He attacks, among other things the post- World War II politically correct thesis that the Germans reached as easy accomodation with the Romans and together they worked hand-in-hand to transform Europe into the 6th century version of a "Brave New World".

He gives substantial proof for the declining quality of life in the 5th century, and bases his work primarily on archaeologial remains and pottery studies that are often ignored by the text-centered classical scholar. It had never really occurred to me think of the significance of the lack of copper coins after the decline of the Empire, or the change in pottery finds. My doctorate is on the fall of Rome, and I plan to use this as a text the next time I teach the course. It is well illustrated, written with great wit and is brief enough to hold the interest of any student. The only odd thing about this book is that it does not mention the 80 year old "Pirenne Thesis" on the collapse of Mediterranean trade; he does however, give Peter Brown and the contemporary American "spiritual enlightenment and rebirth" school a good thrashing!
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229 of 249 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Pots, tiles and coins" - The end of comfort September 9, 2005
Format:Hardcover
Bryan Ward-Perkins is concerned with impact of the collapse of the Western Roman Empire on the standard of living, or what he calls "the loss of comfort."

Seen from this standpoint, the end of Rome was the end of the world's first complex, specialised economy.

He is careful to explain that the end of the Roman Empire was not a uniform process, and that the Eastern half of the empire continued to flourish until the time of the Arab attacks in the seventh century AD.

He uses three instances: pottery, roof tiles, and coinage, to demonstrate the material changes which took place.

The use of pottery was widespread throughout the Empire, it was not solely the preserve of the elite, its manufacture was industrial, and its quality was excellent.

In provinces like Britain the availability of sophisticated, mass produced, quality pottery simply disappeared.

The skills and technology were lost. (Well the German invaders never had them!)

Tiled roofs do not catch fire, they do not attract insects, and they do not need replacing every thirty years. In Britain, " ... the quarrying of building stone, preparation of mortar, manufacture and use of bricks and tiles ... " all ceased.

Coins are the hallmark of economic sophistication: in Roman times they were "a standard feature of everyday

life ... " Their disappearance meant the disappearance of economic complexity, and in the West this was "almost total".

These three instances highlight the loss of specialisation, and as the author points out, specialisation depends on

"a sophisticated network of transport and commerce ... in order to distribute ... goods efficiently and widely.
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50 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply brilliant. Buy this book today! July 4, 2006
Format:Hardcover
This book is, quite simply, one of the finest history books I have ever read (and I am an avid history fan). I wish more academic writers had both the will and the ability to write as clearly and with as much flaire as Bryan Ward Perkins in this book. Sadly, it is a skill that is lacked by many of them; yet this only makes the author's achievement all the greater. Perkins does not go in for the obfuscating style that sometimes plagues academic writing. He does not need to hide behind dense terminology - he explains his ideas confidently and in plain English. I truly believe that this excellent book deserves a five star review rating.

In short, I urge you with all possible enthusiasm to buy this book today!
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56 of 63 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Roman Civilization Really Did "Fall." March 18, 2006
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
I came to Bryan Ward-Perkins' work indirectly, through reading Rodney Stark's "The Victory of Reason." Stark argues the reason for the superiority of Western culture is the Christian religion, especially the Catholic Christian religion with its emphasis on the (alleged) rationality of God and on the goodness of creation.

Stark's Christian triumphalism requires him to attack the classic account of the "Decline and Fall" of Western Roman Civilization by Edward Gibbion. Gibbon argued (in 1776) that the "useless" activities of the monasteries and churches in the 5th Century required so much labor and wealth that little was left over to fend off the barbarians. The fall of Rome, Gibbon concluded, "was a triumph of barbarism and religion." (Amazon sells a nice little summary of Gibbon's views entitled "Christians and the Fall of Rome.")

Stark dissents from Gibbon's view, arguing that there had been no "fall" of civilization in the 5th Century. There had simply been a cultural segue from one type of social organization (Roman) to another (feudal society featuring monasteries and local castles).

I had never heard anyone seriously deny there had been a "fall" of Roman civilization in the 5th Century, and I did not know enough at that time to contest his ideas. Then while in a waiting room, I came across an article by Ward-Perkins in the magazine "History Today" (as I recall its title). Ward-Perkins briefly laid out the issue between the defenders of the "discontinuity thesis" (like Gibbon) and the defenders of the "continuity thesis" (which included historians like the Oxford historian Peter Brown and of course Rodney Stark).
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars This book uses data to show that the material well ...
This book uses data to show that the material well being of the average Roman reduced significantly in the years following the anglo saxon invasion. Read more
Published 7 days ago by Pranay Vaidya
5.0 out of 5 stars & I find the e-format edition almost as easy to use as paper
I bought the Kindle version because the pages in my hardcopy are falling out. The book itself is well researched & well written. Read more
Published 2 months ago by KC Resident
4.0 out of 5 stars Scholarly and Compelling
Ward-Perkins writes a scholarly and compelling discussion of one of the great transitions of history. Read more
Published 4 months ago by Fred M.
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. Found it by chance in a French blog ...
Excellent. Found it by chance in a French blog on current events.
Published 6 months ago by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Good thesis
I really enjoyed this book, it provided a great view on how the empire fell and the effects of it. The writing style is easy to read and not dry like some history books can be
Published 7 months ago by P. Greco
5.0 out of 5 stars A Refreshing Update About a Troubled Time
Prof. Ward-Perkins has done us a great service in bringing to bear and synthesizing the latest research and findings from diverse disciplines on this important time of transition... Read more
Published 9 months ago by Thomas J. Stadnik
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book Worth Reading!
Excellent book presenting the collapse of Roman civilization as the tragedy it was. Highly recommend to those persons who are familiar with Roman history and its aftermath.
Published 10 months ago by Richard C. Waring
5.0 out of 5 stars Even the Cows Got Smaller
In the past few decades scholars of late antiquity, such as Peter Brown and Walter Goffart, have put forth the notion that the Roman Empire didn't fall violently, but rather... Read more
Published 11 months ago by JBL
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fall of Rome
Excellent narrative. Should be compulsory reading in certain University courses. Economics in particular.
Just goes to show that history seems to repeat itself
Published 13 months ago by Hermann J Weber
5.0 out of 5 stars Sets the record straight
In the past 20 or 30 years, it has become fashionable to insist that the fall of Rome was peaceful, that the Roman Empire was never invaded but peacefully 'accommodated' outside... Read more
Published 14 months ago by R. Smith
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