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Comment: Soho Crime, TPB, 1982, 2001 reprint. Appears never read, clean, tight binding, no markings or highlighting, minimal shelf wear
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The False Inspector Dew Paperback – July 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 251 pages
  • Publisher: Soho Crime (July 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1569472556
  • ISBN-13: 978-1569472552
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #751,567 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A stylish, lucid writer, and wickedly clever as well." --Ruth Rendell
-- Review

About the Author

Peter Lovesey is the author of more than thirty highly praised mystery novels. He has been awarded the CWA Gold and Silver Daggers, the Cartier Diamond Dagger for Lifetime Achievement, the Strand Magazine Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Macavity, Barry, and Anthony Awards, and many other honors. He lives in West Sussex, England.

More About the Author

PETER LOVESEY is the author of the Peter Diamond mysteries, well known for their use of surprise, strong characters and hard-to-crack puzzles. He was awarded the Cartier Diamond Dagger in 2000, the Grand Prix de Litterature Policiere, the Anthony, the Ellery Queen Readers' Award and is Grand Master of the Swedish Academy of Detection. He has been a full-time author since 1975, and was formerly in further education. Earlier series include the Sergeant Cribb mysteries seen on TV and the Bertie, Prince of Wales novels. The Diamond novels, set in Bath, England, where Peter lived for some years, feature a burly, warm-hearted, but no-nonsense police detective whose personal life becomes as engaging to the reader as the intricate mysteries he solves. His team in Bath CID includes the ex-journo Ingeborg Smith, the long-serving Keith Halliwell and the meticulous John Leaman, all involved in what is essentially a fair-play procedural mystery series. Peter and his wife Jax, who co-scripted the TV series, have a son, Phil, also a teacher and mystery writer, and a daughter Kathy, who was a Vice-President of J.P.Morgan-Chase, and now lives with her family in Greenwich, Ct. Peter currently lives in Chichester, England. His website at www.peterlovesey.com gives fuller details of his life and books. "Try him. You'll love him," wrote the doyen of the mystery world, Otto Penzler, in the New York Sun.

Customer Reviews

This one is as good as ther others...never boring.
joyce t shallis
The narrative's dynamic, because the story is told from different perspectives.
mig.aa
It's a good read, cleverly written, and a bit humorous as well.
Neal J. Pollock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A. Anderson on May 4, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Lovesey often gives the sense his tongue is firmly in his cheek. The False Inspector Dew reads as though it were written in the 40s: the characters are drawn as wry twists on old cliches, sailing along (literally) in their frothy, and quietly funny, quest for love and bungled adventure. The False Inspector is not what he seems (like many of the characters). Like Chance in Being There, Walter is imbued by everyone else with characteristics he just doesn't have. Lovesey pokes fun at romance (particularly with the wistful and foolish heroine), detection (the ship's officer whom the false inspector displaces is equally as bad a dectective as our hero) and finally with plot, which he twists to suit his neat but far fetched needs. The cast springs from the Victorian parlors: the shipboard Johnny, the nearly harumphing captain, the well heeled family trying to marry off their daughter, the light fingered and lovely shill, and the aw-darn, I-really-liked-him murderer. This is not a slap your knee comedy, but your leg is consistently pulled in a dry English humor sort of way. There seems to be a real, honest to God, genuine mistake in the book, where one character refers to a character by the true name which hasn't yet been revealed. I re-read that part, thinking that Lovesey was having another go at my leg, but no, I think it really slipped through. This is a book best read where you can sit smiling to yourself without anyone asking you what the joke is. I had the sense that Lovesey has read all the old detective novels, and seen all the black and white movies and is having his way with them and us.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Michael Schau on August 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
I have read my fellow reviewers' comments and wonder that no one mentions the peculiar and vague ending. Set aboard a trans-Atlantic liner in the late '20s, the mystery is all snappy sailing -- full of fun characters and deft twists. And just when you know that you will get the answer to whodunnit you are left floundering and asking a dozen questions about why the plot took such an unlikely turn. I am not alone in this; a friend who read the book as well asked me to explain the uncertain ending. An amusing read if you don't mind the lack of a finale.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Reader on December 21, 2005
Format: Paperback
I agree with much that's been said here by other readers. I enjoyed this book right up until the moment I'd finished it. And then - SPOILER ALERT! ONLY READ ON IF OR AFTER YOU'VE FINISHED THE BOOK YOURSELF - I started questioning the plot's logic.

Here goes. So Lydia, the wife who we are led to believe was murdered by her husband Walter, actually left the Mauretania - the ship where much of the novel's action takes place - on the pilot boat, In which case, Walter didn't murder anyone. So why did he pretend to his mistress Alma that he had, that the body was in the trunk, and that he put it through the porthole as planned? If Lydia were still on board, which he would have to assume was the case, she would have seen him at some later stage in the voyage, so he could hardly have afforded not to tell Alma that the planned murder had not yet taken place.

Furthermore - I suppose you could say that Lydia had no option but to leave all her expensive dresses behind on the ship because she couldn't carry them on the pilot boat - but you'd think she would have packed them, or at least told the crew to look after them. What possible reason did she have, for that matter, for failing to tell the ship she was getting off? And why in tarnation did she leave her make-up in the cabin - which she clearly did, because Alma puts it on? Moreover, since Walter's plan was to gain admission to Lydia's cabin by knocking on the door, certain that she'd let him in to find out what he was doing there, how did he get in when she'd already left the ship?

 

And if the character Johnny was so infatuated with Lydia after seeing her on the stage, how could he possibly have thought that Alma was her, since there is no suggestion that the two were a close match in appearance?
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Neal J. Pollock VINE VOICE on April 27, 2006
Format: Paperback
This is my 1st Lovesey book--I got his name from the Mystery Lovers' Book of Quotations. It reminds me of Tony Curtis in The Great Imposter. He even had a stint on a ship in the movie--as a dentist! This book seems to me to start out quite slowly. At least half the book appeared to dawdle, though the author needed to set up some context for later developments. Once onboard it got a bit more interesting, but after "Dew" is on the case, it got quite interesting. I liked the way Lovesey played on the mind-reading history to explain "Dew's" approach & success in part. The plot suddenly falls together & the reader does have sufficient clues to guess most of the mystery--except for the very end--which was a bit surprising though not a great shock to me. If one ignores hearsay & assumptions, possibilities are less limited & the truth can often be seen. There are a few questions about the final ending, but it is fiction after all. It's a good read, cleverly written, and a bit humorous as well.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Dee D on December 28, 2011
Format: Paperback
My very favorite Lovesey. It's a fun read, a good mystery, an excellent twist. I didn't find it confusing and I have read it many times just for the fun of it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Naujoks on October 24, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This fast paced layered who-done-it, is set in the time of the Great ships, and you'll love your trip with this cast of characters on the voyage to America. With its tie ins to the sinking of the Lusetania, this is a page turner that keeps you in suspense till the final pages. A truly clever and fun read! You may be booking a cruise when you're finished, or avoiding them.
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