The Fast and the Furious (1964) NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(16) IMDb 5.3/10
Available on Prime

On the run from a framed murder charge, a blacklisted truck driver takes a woman's Jaguar (with her in it) and enters the Pebble Beach road race...in order to get across the border to freedom.

Starring:
John Ireland, Dorothy Malone
Runtime:
1 hour 14 minutes

The Fast and the Furious (1964)

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller, Mystery
Director John Ireland, Edward Sampson
Starring John Ireland, Dorothy Malone
Supporting actors Bruce Carlisle, Iris Adrian, Marshall Bradford, Bruno VeSota, Byrd Holland, Larry Thor, Henry Rowland, Jean Howell, Dick Pinner, Robin Morse, Lou Place, 'Snub' Pollard, Roger Corman, Jonathan Haze, William Woodson
Studio MGM
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

He had only seen the newer version(s)!
D RAT 1
You can get this movie cheap if you look in the right places, but I don't think it's particularly worth it.
Andrew McCaffrey
The problems and flaws with the film seem insurmountable.
Daniel C. Markel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Johnny 5 on November 21, 2008
Format: DVD
This film is nothing like the 2001 film of the same name and that's good. John Ireland does a great job being the criminal in this one and Dorothy Malone is good as the head smart woman in a man's world. While the film really does look like Roger Corman found a group of racers and decided to build a film around them, this is definitely not a bad film. It is defiantly a great little classic to watch.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jose Lopez on July 20, 2011
Format: DVD
This was before the Corvette(the Best,America's Sportscar) was given a V8 and made proper, So you will be seeing the Jaguar as the star of the movie,a Nice little car but not my scene,plenty of Racing action from the "Sportscar" Crowd so no hot rodding,good story but a bit dull,the plus is all the cars racing Especially the Allards! Allards were Caddy Powered(Some-those are my favorites),this was Way before a Puny little Honda or Ugly Scion or RWD Nissan was the car of choice sadly for My generation.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Peter Baklava on March 28, 2013
Format: DVD
Most cinephiles don't want to admit it, but this kind of lurid, "B" movie fare had a larger influence than it is usually allowed. Just think of Quentin Tarentino and the whole school that he inspired.

There's a flimsy plot to this flick, in which the barest of ideas (a female participant in a California car rally, sidetracked by a suspected felon) is allowed to snowball, picking up whatever detritus the writers could come up with. There are only two actors of any prestige involved, Dorothy Malone and John Ireland, and outside of a couple of funky locales, like a truckstop diner--there's really nothing to it. All that the plot hangs on is a simple road chase.

These type of shoestring budget movies ("Carnival of Souls" is another) showed aspiring kids that just about anybody could make a movie, if they could just develop a rudimentary style of filmmaking and keep a simple contrivance rolling for 90 minutes.

The carelessness, the cavalier attitude of the director--rather than some Brando-esque anti-hero-- became an inspiration to some modern moviemakers. And for a certain type of viewer, the tossed-off dialogue, characters who have one scene and are then dispatched to linger a while in a vegetative state, and clunky production values, became part of the charm of watching movies 'so bad that they are good'.

Personally, I'd rather watch "Gun Crazy" anyday, but for some people this kind of mindless ride is the cat's meow.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert I. Hedges HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on August 21, 2012
Format: DVD
Not to be confused with the entirely unrelated Vin Diesel vehicle from a half-century later, Roger Corman's production of "The Fast and the Furious" from 1954 stars John Ireland and Dorothy Malone, with a large cast of supporting players like Snub Pollard and Bruno VeSota, who you may remember from a wide variety of roles including "Kojak," "The Wild Wild World of Batwoman," "Attack of the Giant Leeches," and even "Leave it to Beaver." While VeSota does fine, the low point for acting has to be the opening scenes in the restaurant anytime waitress Wilma (Iris Adrian) opens her mouth: her voice may be the most grating I have ever heard. Ireland and Malone do reasonably well with their parts, although the script is frequently implausible and extremely melodramatic.

The film has lots of typical 50s action ploys: the radio announcement providing the background, the hero wrongly accused of murder who gets a wealthy woman with lots of money and a Jaguar to fall for him, loads of terrible dialogue delivered with hypersincerity, etc. While the plot meanders around Ireland's fight for justice and flight to Mexico, the story strains all possible credibility with the pretense that the police know where the murderer is, they know he's driving a Jaguar, but he's seen all over the place in a Jaguar and he is never caught by their clever detective methodology. The "I love you-I hate you" romantic story of kidnapping, fleeing from police, and hilarious driving tutelage are somewhat improbable at their most likely, and detract from the film substantially. Head-scratching plotpoints abound: my favorite is when Ireland locks Malone in a shed while he flees to Mexico. Mind you this shack is in the middle of nowhere, so how does she escape? She sets fire to it from the inside, expecting someone to free her.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Robert I. Hedges HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on August 21, 2012
Format: DVD
Not to be confused with the entirely unrelated Vin Diesel vehicle from a half-century later, Roger Corman's production of "The Fast and the Furious" from 1954 stars John Ireland and Dorothy Malone, with a large cast of supporting players like Snub Pollard and Bruno VeSota, who you may remember from a wide variety of roles including "Kojak," "The Wild Wild World of Batwoman," "Attack of the Giant Leeches," and even "Leave it to Beaver." While VeSota does fine, the low point for acting has to be the opening scenes in the restaurant anytime waitress Wilma (Iris Adrian) opens her mouth: her voice may be the most grating I have ever heard. Ireland and Malone do reasonably well with their parts, although the script is frequently implausible and extremely melodramatic.

The film has lots of typical 50s action ploys: the radio announcement providing the background, the hero wrongly accused of murder who gets a wealthy woman with lots of money and a Jaguar to fall for him, loads of terrible dialogue delivered with hypersincerity, etc. While the plot meanders around Ireland's fight for justice and flight to Mexico, the story strains all possible credibility with the pretense that the police know where the murderer is, they know he's driving a Jaguar, but he's seen all over the place in a Jaguar and he is never caught by their clever detective methodology. The "I love you-I hate you" romantic story of kidnapping, fleeing from police, and hilarious driving tutelage are somewhat improbable at their most likely, and detract from the film substantially. Head-scratching plotpoints abound: my favorite is when Ireland locks Malone in a shed while he flees to Mexico. Mind you this shack is in the middle of nowhere, so how does she escape? She sets fire to it from the inside, expecting someone to free her.
Read more ›
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