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The Fields Paperback – December 20, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 82 pages
  • Publisher: Apex Book Company (December 20, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1937009025
  • ISBN-13: 978-1937009021
  • Product Dimensions: 0.2 x 5.4 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,468,204 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ty Schwamberger is a growing force within the horror genre. He is the author of a novel, multiple novellas and collections, and is the editor on several anthologies. In addition, he’s had many short stories published online and in print. Two stories, “Cake Batter” (released in 2010) and “House Call” (in pre-production in 2011), have been optioned for film adaptation. He is also an Active Member of the Horror Writers Association. You can learn more at tyschwamberger.com.

More About the Author

Ty Schwamberger is an award-winning author & editor in the horror genre. He is the author of a novel, multiple novellas, collections and editor on several anthologies. In addition, he's had many short stories published online and in print. Three stories, "Cake Batter" (released in 2010), "House Call" (released in 2013) and DININ' (optioned in July 2013), have been optioned for film adaptation. He is an Active Member of the International Thriller Writers. Learn more at http://tyschwamberger.com or follow on Twitter @SchwambergerTy.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Yep, I'd recommend this book.
Lisa
It's both a fantastic horror story and a great piece of Gothic fiction.
Gothic Readers Book Club
One thing I had trouble envisioning as I read the book was the farm.
Wag The Fox

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Adam on January 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
I found this review. I couldn't have said it better myself so I copied and pasted it:

The Fields by Ty Schwamberger
Review by Howard Allan

After I received an advanced copy of Ty Schwamberger's novella The Fields, I turned the first pages and immediately began reading kudos by notable authors and magazines such as Gary A. Braunbeck and Shroud Magazine. I never judge a book by its cover, but I do start judging books by their praise. And with an introduction by Jonathan Maberry (Rot and Ruin, Patient Zero), I was excited to start reading.
Jonathan Maberry starts off his introduction stating "The Fields is a morality tale. With Zombies." Maberry then explains to the reader that zombie tales are more than cannibalistic and mindless corpses. These tales, if written with feelings and responsibility, remind the reader zombies are people and they have life and their own stories. This is what Ty Schwamberger accomplishes with The Fields. He, as many authors have tried but failed, brings out the emotion of the characters but not just the living, but the dead also with much success.
The opening chapter sets The Fields pace; quick with that sense of emotion that is mentioned in Maberry's introduction. The reader is drawn in as Billy Fletcher, son of plantation owner in the Deep South, is racing through the darkness with zombie in tow. Schwamberger describes Billy's friendly relationship with the former slave now turned zombie Samuel. Yes, that could happen and yes, if you've studied American history, friendly relationship between slaves and owners did indeed exist. With not giving away too much of the plot, Billy survives the zombie encounter.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By David Bernstein on June 28, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Fields is a wonderfully crafted tale of ignorance, weakness, and evil--of the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. It's dark, atmospheric and brilliant. Ty makes us feel a part of the book's time period and of Billy's world, with his smooth prose and attention to detail. It's an original supernatural horror story, and alone it's great as is, but it's also a story with a message, a lesson. It has zombies, but I wouldnt think of it as a typical zombie novel, but a horror novel with the undead in it. And as everyone knows, a great tale is always about the humans, the most wicked of all monsters.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By twink5519 on January 28, 2012
Format: Paperback
For all those who think every zombie story is the same mix of mayhem and gore, read this story! A wonderful change of pace in a genre that has taken off!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Wag The Fox on August 29, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It turns out that one way to go forward with the zombie genre is to go backwards--in time, anyway. Ty Schwamberger's novella, The Fields, offers up the story set in the days following the American Civil War of Billy Fletcher, a young plantation owner in dire need of help to keep the farm going before the tobacco crop dies. He inherited it after his father passed away, a cruel slave-owner who didn't just exploit those indentured on his farm, but tortured them as well, even burying slaves behind his expansive tobacco fields. Even his son wound up the receiving end of more than a few beatings for showing sympathy for the slaves and other deeds considered sins in his father's eyes.

But despite vowing to run the plantation differently from his father, to work the land himself rather than resort to slave labor, the young man is failing. Enter a man named Abraham who knocks on Billy's door one day and offers him a solution. There's no real telling where Abraham came from, but he sure seems to know a lot about Billy and his father, and assures Billy that what he needs to do is follow in his father's footsteps. And that's something that Billy is adamant about avoiding, because he doesn't want to be a slave-owner like his father. But what if the slaves are already dead?

This was a tremendously creepy zombie story, due mainly because of the racial current running through it. The idea that a person would only be enslaved during when they're alive, but when they're dead as well, is an unsettling one to say the least. One thing I had trouble envisioning as I read the book was the farm. Billy, Abraham, and the zombies jumped off the page, but the plantation itself felt very much like a stage-dressing when I was expecting something much more vivid.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Randy on June 15, 2012
Format: Audible Audio Edition
It's a great (although not your typical) zombie story (think kind of The Serpent and the Rainbow meets a Gone with The Wind with attitude) that takes place in the post Civil War south. The well meaning son of a deceased slave driving tobacco plantation owner, Billy Fletcher, is having trouble sleeping. Nightmares filled with horrible rotted monsters walking through his tobacco fields by moonlight. Visions of gnarled, reaching fingers, and cold chomping teeth fill his nights.

It's no wonder he's losing sleep. The stress of maintaining the farms huge crop has fallen on his shoulders. His father, one of the most successful farmers in three counties (who was full of dark secrets that now Billy must keep) haunts Billy's thoughts (in more ways than one) day and night. Not only is he the moral and character opposite of his murderous, furious, racist father, but the Civil War has ended, and abolition has robbed him of the help he needs to care for the starving, choking crop growing in the weedy, rock filled fields. Billy may not survive the long, cold winter if his tobacco plants keep dying and he ends the harvest with not enough crops to sell.

Enter Abraham, a pillar of a man with a stove-pipe hat that looks strangely similar to... well... the sworn enemy of former Confederates everywhere, the recently assassinated 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. This Abraham knocks on Billy's door, and whispers temptation into his longing ears. Billy doesn't trust Abraham from the start, maybe because he looks like the Union Army's former commander and chief, or maybe it's because he NEVER takes off his hat, and seems to disappear, literally melt, into the sunrise, but with the fertile whisperings of his father's ghost, Abrahams tempting seed WANTS to grow in Billy's mind.
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