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The Fight for Truth (Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice, Book 9) Paperback – August 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 - 12 years
  • Lexile Measure: 550L (What's this?)
  • Series: Star Wars: Jedi Apprentice (Book 9)
  • Paperback: 138 pages
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks (August 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0590520806
  • ISBN-13: 978-0590520805
  • Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #533,381 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Hello! Thanks for clicking. I'm Jude Watson, and I write for kids. It's the best job in the world.

As a writer, I wear two hats. As Judy Blundell I write for Young Adults, and I won the National Book Award for my novel, WHAT I SAW AND HOW I LIED.

I write for middle-graders while wearing my Jude Watson hat, which is a bit more colorful. Maybe it even has a spinning propeller on top. I love to write mystery-adventures with thrilling twists and oddball characters and kids who find themselves in impossible situations doing incredible things.

I do all this from a chair, in a little room, in a not-big house, in a small town on Long Island. I like to read and I like to draw (badly) and my idea of excitement is to lace up my sneakers and walk to the harbor and back. I'm a nervous flyer and though I am respectful of the physics of modern aviation I also secretly suspect that it is only the unified belief of passengers that tons of metal can hurtle through the air that keeps a plane in flight. I am also not terribly comfortable on suspension bridges. And don't even ask me to go on a ferris wheel.

I am listing these fears just to clue you in: I'm a physical coward. I'm also a creature of habit. Once in awhile I go a little crazy and take a different route to the grocery store.

Still, I'll throw incredible amounts of danger at my characters. And I'll cackle maniacally while I do it.

Other random facts: During deadline periods I am deeply committed to popcorn and apples.

Every summer I go to Cape Cod, and every summer I wish I had a whole month there. I never do.

I am waiting for the day I'll see someone reading a book of mine in an airport or a train or a diner. I will most likely embarrass myself by cavorting and singing "That's ME!"

If you want to learn more about me or take a look at my books, visit my website, judewatsonbooks.com. Until then, happy reading!

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
While it is not as exciting as some of the past Jedi Apprentice books, this book is a nice addition to the series. A simple Jedi mission turns out to be more complicated than first expected. One can almost imagine Jude Watson giving the main characters a sort of break after their last run in with Xanatos.
This story is good for kids as provides strong messages about working together and thinking for one's own self. The only drawback is the lack of time Qui-gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi are together. This story does nothing to bring their relationship closer. However, there is an interisting hint into the future of the Jedi that ties this book into the Star Wars Universe. I would recommend that people read this if they want to stay in touch with the Jedi Apprentice Series.
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Herman HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on July 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
Obi-Wan Kenobi isn't happy to hear that he and his master, Qui-Gon Jinn, will have to work with another master-apprentice team on their newest mission.... especially since the other apprentice is Siri, a girl who is two years younger than Obi-Wan but just as skilled. Obi-Wan finds Siri difficult to work with, and she seems hostile and unfriendly toward him. When Obi-Wan, Siri, and their masters land on the planet Kegan to search for a baby who may have the potential to be a Jedi, they descover a strange world that has not had any contact with off-worlders for over three decades. When they are exploring, Obi-Wan and Siri are mistaken for Keganite children cutting school, they are abucted and placed in a detention facility where children are drilled to accept the rule of the Kegan leaders. In this place where freedom is a memory and questioning authority strictly forbidden, Obi-Wan and Siri must rely on their connection to the force and to each other if they want to make it out alive. I highly reccomend this series to all Star Wars fans. It's a children's series, but you don't have to be a child to enjoy it - I'm several years older than the suggested age level, and the book had me on the edge of my seat.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 24, 2000
Format: Paperback
The Fight for Truth is the best book in the Jedi Apprentice series so far - I loved it. It's much better than #8, The Day of Reckoning:
Siri, 11 (who was mentioned in The Captive Temple two books back), has become Adi Gallia's apprentice. In The Fight for Truth, she and Adi are sent with Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan on a mission to the world of Kegan to test a Force-sensitive child - and she won't stop reminding Obi-Wan of his humiliating incident on Melida/Daan when he left Qui-Gon. To make matters worse, Siri fights only for herself, not Obi-Wan, when they are supposed to be fighting together.
Obi-Wan and Siri are separated from their masters not long after they arrive on Kegan, and because no one has landed on the planet for 30 years, the residents don't believe them when they say they're visitors. They are placed in the Learning Circle, a strict school where the information taught to students isn't even correct. When Obi-Wan and Siri tell the truth about it, they're given punishment marks, and made to clean the school kitchen.
During this time, O-Vieve, one of the two Benevolent Guides on Kegan, has a vision: darkness will come from the Jedi themselves (guess who? Anakin!), and therefore she refuses to let Qui-Gon and Adi stay any longer, fearing for the safety of Kegan. Qui-Gon and Adi must leave without their apprentices, and they are not allowed to take the Force-sensitive child with them to the Temple. But by now, Obi-Wan and Siri are in the Re-Learning Circle, a place much worse than the original Learning Circle, a place where Qui-Gon and Adi can't find them.
Be sure to read or buy this book - you don't want to miss it.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 21, 2000
Format: Paperback
Wow! What can I say? If it were possible to give a book more that five stars, this one would definitely earn it. I am one of the large group of "older" readers who appreciates how well this excellent series augments the Star Wars universe, handling Qui-gon and Obi-wan's developing Master/Apprentice relationship with such an adroit touch. I have been a great fan of Watson's Jedi Apprentice books since #1 appeared on shelves, and have eagerly awaited each new publication. In my opinion, #9: The Fight for Truth, is one of the best in the series.
We have a world shrouded in secrecy. A mystery to be solved. Children in peril. Masters learning to cooperate to save their padawans. Padawans learning to cooperate to save themselves, and a chiling foreshadowing of tragic events to come in the Star Wars universe. A tale full of suspense and dangers.
My only complaint? A final chapter that wraps up things a mite too quickly and neatly for my taste... but that is speaking as an older reader who was intrigued by the entire political system described in the story. Younger readers will probably be unconcerned with the abrupt closure.
Once again, I do wish these books were longer... they are so good I want to prolong the enjoyment as long as possible. However, within the constraints of 138 pages, Watson does a remarkable job of telling a fully developed, complex story. Generally, it only takes me a short time to read these books, but this is the first one I have read cover to cover without a single break... it was that engrossing!
Read and enjoy!
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