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The Final Days: The Last, Desperate Abuses of Power by the Clinton White House Hardcover – October 1, 2001


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Regnery Publishing; First Edition edition (October 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0895261677
  • ISBN-13: 978-0895261670
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (126 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,210,804 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

What would conservative writer Olson have opined about the September 11 terrorist attacks on the United States? We will never know, because she was on board the airliner that dove into the Pentagon that day. But one can guess: she might have decried President Clinton's failure to confront Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network or cited it as just another of the policy failures of the most corrupt President in American history. For in this, her last book, she drags fact after fact into the light of day and bitterly, even sneeringly, rails against the Clintons, their characters and lifestyles, their liberal friends and radical causes, their moral failures and shady activities. She is clearly preaching to the choir, but what an indictment she brings-especially regarding the Clinton pardons of Marc Rich and a pro-Communist terrorist and many, many others. Olson had particular distaste for former First Lady Hillary Clinton, finding elements of her Senate campaign unutterably corrupt; she didn't much like her personally either. This over-the-top approach will, for many listeners, dilute her message but, still, the book is hard to ignore. Reader Kimberly Schraf proceeds with a measured cadence somewhat distant from the words, and that is probably the best approach to listening to an angry tract such as this. Libraries with a modern political history collection will find this work flying off the shelf, at least until the Clintons pass from the American scene.
Don Wismer, Cary Memorial Lib., Wayne, ME
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

Former federal prosecutor Barbara Olson served as the Chief Investigative Counsel to the U.S. House of Representatives' Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, where she spearheaded the investigation of the Clinton administration's travel office firings and eventually uncovered the explosive "filegate" scandal. She also served as the Principal Assistant General Counsel and Solicitor to the House.

Barbara Olson was killed on September 11, 2001, when the airplane she had just boarded for Los Angeles was hijacked by terrorists and crashed into the Pentagon. Though invariably charming and gracious, Barbara was both passionate and courageous. She held strong opinions, and nobody who was in the same room with her ever had any doubt about what she believed. She did not apologize for what she thought or said, and she always spoke her mind articulately and clearly. Barbara Olson was a champion of freedom. And she was a champion of the rule of law--of the need to maintain a free and civil society by means of a well-defined body of law that protects the individual from government tyranny. All of us at Regnery Publishing are deeply saddened by the loss of our author and friend. Our thoughts and prayers are with her husband, Solicitor General Ted Olson, and the thousands of other relatives and friends who have lost their loved ones in the terrorist attacks on our country.


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Customer Reviews

I hope everyone who cares about democracy will read The Final Days.
Donald Mitchell
Barbara Olson's book The Final Days is her research into the Final Days of Bill and Hillary Clinton's final days in the White House.
Letta Meinen
One of the best points of the book was the complete lack of hyperbolic arguments or vitriolic chatter from the author.
Enigma

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

68 of 81 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 19, 2001
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Barbara Olson left behind as part of her legacy a truly engrossing account of the greed driven Clinton administration, particularly in its last months. Barbara's literary style is breezy but compelling. When I completed reading this book I was paradoxically filled with admiration for the author, who presented a detailed and damning story on the subject matter, and at the same time I was filled with revulsion toward both Bill and Hillary Clinton. Such greed and abuse of power on both their parts likened them to me in my mind to the Marcos regime in the Phillipines during their reign of power in the 70's and 80's. Their collective attitudes could be summed up with the following: Do the right thing? What's in it for me? Do the wrong thing? Grease my palm and I'll consider it. Those who value history should consider Ms. Olson's book for their personal library. It's a keeper and a call to vigilance to voters when they again consider questionable characters for high office.
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196 of 243 people found the following review helpful By Andrew S. Rogers VINE VOICE on November 8, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Jefferson has Dumas Malone, Lincoln has Carl Sandburg, and Bill Clinton has Barbara Olson -- the biographer who, if there's any justice in the world (for him, if not for her), will be associated with his name for the rest of time.
Olson's final book is a chronicling of the last weeks of Bill and Hillary Clinton's co-presidency. She gives us a quick, but important, survey of a number of Clintonian outrages, including massive land and power-grabs, Senator-to-be Hillary's shameless and desperate panhandling of expensive gifts before she fell under the Senate's ethics rules, and Slick's international 'farewell tour' of foreign countries -- a field trip that cost taxpayers billions and gained us, diplomatically, less than nothing.
But where Olson's analysis really shines is in her efforts to get to the bottom of 'Pardongate,' the wave of commutations, clemencies, and pardons that Clinton dished out, some literally in his last minutes in office. About a quarter of the book is spent detailing Clinton's most outrageous pardon, that of multi-billion dollar tax cheat Marc Rich. The last quarter or so discusses his other pardons, handed out to a rogue's gallery consisting largely of relatives, business partners, ex-girlfriends, Cabinet members, and cocaine dealers.
Even as skilled a reporter as Barbara Olson is at a loss to explain why Clinton chose to pardon who he did, or why he consulted so few people before issuing the pardons.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Barbara Olson gave a very personal account of Bill and Hillaray's granting of favors, lying, and manipulating during the last years in the White House. It was a powerful read because of Barbara's professional relationship with the Clintons as a lawyer charged by the US Goverment to aquire information on suspected misdeeds of Hillary. I was a little put off by Barbara's pejorative tone at times but I came to understand her attitude after reading "Hell to Pay." She has devoted years of research into these two people and has shown how their past ideologies have been inflicted in a secretive, manipulative way on the unsuspecting citizens of America. I feel it should be required reading for anyone who wants to support Hillary in any further elected office. It is well worth anyone's time who wants to have a better understanding of what really happened behind the closed doors. It is very readable because Barbara's writing style keeps the reader engaged.
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42 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Ben Hekster on September 18, 2003
Format: Hardcover
In the final days of their co-presidency, the Clintons flipped off the American people one last time. After two terms of lies, corruption, slander, and immorality that were their trademark, was another book about the Clintons really needed? If only to reveal their contempt for the nation and Constitution, if only to see that eventually even Democrats had had enough-- yes, this book was tremendously necessary.

The Clinton presidency was like none other. The man who called late at night to proposition Cyd Dunlop in the hotel room where she stayed with her husband, who was forced to confess on national television to his affair with Gennifer Flowers, brought a New Republic editor to conclude that his persistent adulterizing revealed "a frightening lack of self-control." Arkansas troopers admitted that they had procured more than a hundred women for Clinton.

One of those women refused to be cowed and became the bane of his presidency: Paula Corbin Jones would pay dearly at the hand of the savage Clinton slander machine. Eight years later, in return for immunity from prosecution, Clinton landed a sweetheart deal in which he admitted knowingly violating a judge's order to tell the truth. A federal court held him in contempt for making false statements in a federal proceeding, and Arkansas disbarred him for five years.

Upon leaving the White House, they rather unsubtly opened gift registries with luxury retailers, and Clinton acolytes took the hint. Expensive White House art was shipped to the Clinton Library, and furniture to their new upstate New York home. Terry McAuliffe financed that home and was rewarded with the leadership of the Democratic National Committee.

When Newt Gingrich accepted a $4.
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