Buy Used
$5.77
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: :
Comment: Noticeable wear with very minor damp-staining to the top edge of pages, but visual defect only (no stickiness, scent, etc.) Still very usable. Interior is free from markings. SHIPS W/IN 24 HOURS! Processed by DHL with USPS delivery for an average of 3-5 Day Standard Shipping & 2-3 Day Expedited Shipping!! FREE INSURANCE! Fast & Personal Support! Careful Packaging. No Hassle, Full Refund Return Policy!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Fingerprint of God: Recent Scientific Discoveries Reveal the Unmistakable Identity of the Creator (New Edition) Paperback – June, 2000


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$32.00 $5.77
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 233 pages
  • Publisher: Whitaker House; Revised edition (June 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0883686279
  • ISBN-13: 978-0883686270
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 0.7 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #810,988 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

170 of 184 people found the following review helpful By Jack W. Crenshaw on August 30, 2002
Format: Paperback
I was stunned by reading the other reviews of this book. It appears that the purported reviewers don't even pretend to actually review the thing; they are merely using the pages as springboards to launch off on their own hobby horse, be it Flood theology, end times theology, atheism, or whatever. I see virtually no correlation between the reviews posted here, and the actual content of the book. Those that do actually refer to chapters of the book seem not to have actually _READ_ it, but only scanned it to find something to justify posting their own flawed theology.
There oughtta be a law against posting reviews as a way of having one's say. These reviews can affect the sales of a book. But I guess the reviewers either never thought of that, or don't care. Some Christian attitude.
Well, I _HAVE_ read the book. It was my first discovery of Dr. Ross, and I thought it was wonderful. For those who actually care about its contents, let's get something very straight: Dr. Ross is an _ASTRONOMER_, not a theologian. His book is not about apologetics, no matter what you may have read to the contrary. He has one purpose, which he very clearly states: To point out that there is no need for a war between science and religion, much less a war between different factions within Christianity. As Dr. Ross carefully points out, there have been _NO_ -- that's no, as in zero -- scientific discoveries in recent years that are not consistent with the Bible's depiction of Creation. Quite the contrary, all modern discoveries -- the Big Bang being one obvious example -- point to a creation much like that described so perfectly in Genesis.
Therefore, says Ross, let's bury the hatchet.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
49 of 50 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Ross, an astrophysicist, deals with cosmology using the physical, theological and sometimes the philosophical sciences in a well documented book.
The first part of the book deals with the ancient cosmologies, the Greek and medieval philosophers, and the rise of astronomy/physics in the 16-17th centuries. Then Ross explains the consequences of Kant's deism, in particular his view of the universe as uncreated and infinite. The first part ends with the recent physical observations at the end of the 19th century (refuting Kant's view); and special and general relativity, with their theological consequences due to the singularity (begin of time and space.) Ross does a good job, but is sometimes weak (e. g. about the modern rejection of theistic arguments: he never mentions the real problem: the rise of nominalism and skepticism.)
The second part deals with 20th century physical cosmologies and how all alternatives to the Big Bang had to be empirically rejected and how much the awesome evidence for the Big Bang accumulated. Here Ross is at his best. He also points out the atheistic motivations of those who tried to avoid the Big Bang. Most of this is excellent, he has also good insights on Quantum physics. However a few passages are unsatisfying, as his simple dismissal of Tipler's anthropic principles or his arguments against quantum originations of the universe (my impression is that he lacks philosophical depth, and this is problematic when he deals with design or quantum cosmology.) Those interested in apologetics will have to find complements in the writings of William L. Craig, Chris Isham, etc.
The third and last part deals with theology, I found it excellent.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
33 of 37 people found the following review helpful By beda on September 14, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found this to be an excellent book. I am a physician and believe science supports more than a mere materialistic existence. This book draws on biology, mathematics, astronomy, chemistry and physics arguments very convincingly and insightfully. There are not pat cliches for the uneducated, but reasoned argument. The other reviewer does not seem to like this book because it allows that 'to God, a thousand years is like a day' and does not stick to some peoples view of how God should have created the earth.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Aquinatis on November 21, 1999
Format: Paperback
(I am reposting this review, because the email address was wrong and it did not show up on my review page.)
Ross, an astrophysicist, deals with cosmology using the physical, theological and sometimes the philosophical sciences in a well documented book. The first part of the book deals with the ancient cosmologies, the Greek and medieval philosophers, and the rise of astronomy/physics in the 16-17th centuries. Then Ross explains the consequences of Kant's deism, in particular his view of the universe as uncreated and infinite. The first part ends with the recent physical observations at the end of the 19th century (refuting Kant's view); and special and general relativity, with their theological consequences due to the singularity (begin of time and space.) Ross does a good job, but is sometimes weak (e. g. about the modern rejection of theistic arguments: he never mentions the real problem: the rise of nominalism and skepticism.)
The second part deals with 20th century physical cosmologies and how all alternatives to the Big Bang had to be empirically rejected and how much the awesome evidence for the Big Bang accumulated. Here Ross is at his best. He also points out the atheistic motivations of those who tried to avoid the Big Bang. Most of this is excellent, he has also good insights on Quantum physics. However a few passages are unsatisfying, as his simple dismissal of Tipler's anthropic principles or his arguments against quantum originations of the universe (my impression is that he lacks philosophical depth, and this is problematic when he deals with design or quantum cosmology.) Those interested in apologetics will have to find complements in the writings of William L. Craig, Chris Isham, etc.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Hugh Ross (Ph.D., University of Toronto) is founder and president of Reasons To Believe, a ministry team devoted to bridging the gap between science and faith. A well-known author and Christian apologist, Ross has addressed students and faculty on hundreds of campuses, churches, and professional groups in the U.S. and abroad. He also serves on the pastoral staff of Sierra Madre Congregational Church, and as adjunct faculty at A.W. Tozer Seminary in Redding, California. He and his wife, Kathy, and their two sons live in Southern California.