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The Fire Starter Sessions: A Soulful + Practical Guide to Creating Success on Your Own Terms Audible – Unabridged

4.5 out of 5 stars 247 customer reviews

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
I don't normally write book reviews but feel I have to share my view. I was really, really looking forward to this book. Danielle created a lot of hype around it, did tons of interviews, had her soul sisters (Kate Northrup, Marie Forleo, Martha Beck, Kris Carr) do enthusiastic endorsements, and so on. From the Fire Starter testimonials on her site I really thought this book would change my perspective on things and bring in radical shifts. Sadly, this was not the case.

My main problem with Fire Starter Sessions is that it lacks a clear focus. It touches on a hodgepodge of topics - mostly short 5-6 page chapters on dealing with fear, facing forward, handling doubts... - but doesn't delve into any of these topics with much depth. The overall effect is very blog-ish and soapbox-ish. It's as if she has combined years of self-help reading into her own sort of précis. The problem with the précis is that it doesn't offer anything new or ground breaking - it's a rehash of what others have said and done before.

The worksheets are also a bit inane. I was too bored to fill out questions like:

* I think that most people are:...
* I believe that life is:...
* I hold the opinion that:...
* I'm the kind of person who:...
* I relate to people who:...

Perhaps if you're completely new to the game - a drifter, a wanderer, someone with no ambitions, someone who has never read a self-help book in the past - this might be a good 'follow your passion' catalyst. But it wasn't much of a revelation for me.
7 Comments 347 of 371 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I got this book based on the Martha Beck endorsement. I just recently started reading Beck, and she, well, sets me on fire. It's become clear to me that I need to find a passion and make it happen, so this book seemed perfect for me.

It's okay. I think I like Danielle LaPorte, although I'm not even sure of that. I don't love the soulfully sassy persona so many women in this genre seem to cultivate -- like it's way too expected at this point. LaPorte definitely has that persona. "I'm a smart, feminine, playful innovator with a soulful business who makes spiritual ("cellular") connections everywhere I go! And this is how you can be like me!" I *do* want to be like that, but I'm not sure it feels so original here.

I think LaPorte has good ideas and a good grasp of what she's selling, but I don't find her exercises or worksheets compelling. Not that they're bad, or pointing me in the wrong direction, but they don't necessarily feel relevant, or fire-starting, for me.

I think if you *know* specifically what career path you want already, this might be more useful. She starts with a few exercises related to finding that, but so much of the book assumes you have a dream and a vision, I think it would be more useful if you need motivation help rather than visioning help. Most of her examples, too, talk about people who need motivation help rather than visioning help, so I'm guessing this is where her strength is.

So yeah, if you have a vision and need help developing the faith and motivation to just make it happen, this is probably a good fit. If you're looking for help in developing that vision, this probably isn't the place to start.
16 Comments 266 of 288 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover
First of all, I respect Danielle LaPorte and her work. She runs a good blog and has a certain aura of confidence. She's also a good wrangler and event coordinator, and the fact that Amazon is awash with 5 star reviews during the week of her book launch is testimony to that.

I bought the book out of curiosity and to see what all the hype was about. Here is a list of the pros and cons.

PROS: Compared to other self-help books the writing is light and refreshingly brisk.

CONS: Despite what other reviewers have said, the graphic design isn't great. Anyone with an eye for kerning and proportions can see that the layout is a DIY job that could have benefited from a more professional touch.

CONS: While the writing style is fluid and fun, the tone can be quite snarky. Whether she's berating guided meditations for the word "possibility" or saying something like:

"Here's my favourite misuse of holistic positivity: 'There's no such thing as a mistake." Ah, yes, spiritualized justifications of poor behaviour and human weakness..."

The book has a certain "holier than thou" undertone that leaves a bad aftertaste, especially from someone in the "wisdom-broadcasting business", as she calls it.

CONS: The book purports to be a SOULFUL and PRACTICAL guide to success, but falls short of either.

If you're looking for an irreverent guide to business success, works like Dan Kennedy's No B.S. Wealth Attraction for Entrepreneurs are packed with useful tips and actual practical advice.
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2 Comments 146 of 158 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
As self-help books go, this one doesn't go far. LaPorte's message - a very short and simple one - is to find out what you love - I mean, really REALLY REALLY LOVE - and pursue it with insane passion until all barriers fall and you live the life of your dreams. In there are lots of little tools and quizzes to tease out what you love, even if it's not immediately self-evident to you at first; and to work out your strengths and weaknesses, and so forth. This kind of thing is hardly unique to this book, and it's a matter of taste as to whether you will benefit more from this author's or another author's approach. Obviously, if you don't go to the minor trouble to get your head around the actual work, there will be no benefit whatever.

This reviewer's isses with the book concern the style. LaPorte isn't really a self-help author and certainly no psychologist or the like - she's a very energetic cheerleader, kind of the mom of a cheerleader who's trying to stay hip and with-it by copping every current catch word and phrase that seems current today. The language and style gets old, real old, and real fast, too. Without lots of quotes, it's hard to describe - suffice to say she considers herself a very clever wordsmith, she stays ultra-topical, and her turns of phrase, once you see what she's trying to do, are tediously predictable. "I love me some Suze," she says of Suze Orman, by way of telling us first how she disagrees with some pointless point of Orman's. The whole book reads like it's been dictated by an updated Valley Girl on bennies.

If you like Danielle LaPorte's style, and obviously plenty of people do, you may get something out of her presentation; if you prefer motivational and self-help and career books written from a more sober and evaluative point of view, you will most certainly not. There are countless books that are topical and helpful that will be of greater use than this self-indulgent linguistic peacock display.
3 Comments 91 of 98 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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