The First American Army and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $15.95
  • Save: $3.01 (19%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by BigHeartedBooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is in very good condition, there may be some minor wear from a prior reader or two but very good books are in excellent condition. Super fast shipping is available and we offer a money back guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The First American Army: The Untold Story of George Washington and the Men behind America's First Fight for Freedom Paperback – October 1, 2006


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.94
$4.33 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks; 1 edition (October 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402207530
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402207532
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,209,021 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this novelistic treatment of the Revolutionary War, Chadwick (George Washington's War, Brother Against Brother) uses the experiences of eight men to give the reader a "bottom up" look at the war. Drawing on their letters and diaries, he follows them through their years in and out of the war, from the Battle of Bunker Hill in 1775 to the American victory at Yorktown in 1781. Although the horrors of battle are a main focus of their writings, everyday activities and concerns-romance, food, clothing, leisure and friendship-reveal much about these early Americans' lives. Readers will find little academic analysis of the subjects; except for a few expansive chapter introductions, Chadwick keeps standard history writing to a minimum. Instead, he focuses on these men's day-to-day and writes in lively prose, although some accounts push the limits of reconstruction and read like fiction. Readers unfamiliar with the history of the revolutionary war may find themselves lost in the rapid shuffling between campaigns, battles and locations, but the stories of individual soldiers, doctors and ministers are strong enough to carry casual readers as well as those accustomed to academic histories.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

What was it like to be an American soldier at the battles of Bunker Hill, Quebec, Saratoga, and Monmouth? Historian Chadwick's well-crafted narrative of the Continental Army tells the tale through several journals and memoirs. History readers wanting a break from reading generals' biographies will be interested in meeting Chadwick's enlisted men, beginning with fifer John Greenwood, a Johnny Tremain-like 15-year-old who was present at Bunker Hill, much to his mother's distress. Another teenager, Jeremiah Greenman, marched in the disastrous 1775-76 invasion of Canada led by then-hero Benedict Arnold. The smallpox-ravaged survivors of that campaign retreated to the Lake Champlain-Lake George area to have their souls saved by Reverend Ammi Robbins, and their bodies salved by Dr. Lewis Beebe. The latter two exemplify the author's emphasis on the civilian support that sustained the Continental Army, which was not a static organization but one that men were continually joining and leaving. Chadwick makes palpable the day-to-day hardships and intermittent distractions of army life during the Revolutionary War. Gilbert Taylor
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

21 of 24 people found the following review helpful By L. Schofield on November 28, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Are these reviewers for real? Undeserving nobodies and too many african-americans? Please. A book long overdue and an enjoyable read. A tribute to the 243,000 ordinary nobodies,(black and white) who fought at some period in the Revolution,risked it all and paid high prices.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Terry L on April 21, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a generally well-written and enjoyable to read book, but it doesn't quit live up to its sub-title: The Untold Story of George Washington and the Men Behind America's First Fight for Freedom. The book is foremost a retelling of the Battles of the Revolution. It does present viewpoints from the soldiers and others who fought, but I didn't really find a great deal that hasn't been written before, although the portion devoted to Blacks in the Revolution was interesting. Interesting also is how many soldiers died from poor conditions and disease. But I didn't come away feeling that I really got to know the "Men Behind America's First Fight for Freedom." As I said before, the book is mainly a retelling of the story of the battles of the War and secondly, a telling of the battles from the perspective of the common soldier.

For those who haven't read a great deal on the Revolutionary War, this would be a good book to start with. It is enjoyable, easy to read, presents an overview of the history of the War, and gives a perspective on the War from both the commanders and the common soldier. However, if the reader is one who has read a great deal on the Revolutionary War, there isn't really a great deal that is new here. It is a good book, but not one I would put on my top-ten list of Revolutionary War books.

The one thing I found irritating about the book is that several times it left some loose ends dangling. For example, one point in the book tells of George Washington's sometimes leniency toward those who were being disciplined. The author goes on to tell of a group of men sentenced to death for desertion and re-enlisting in order to collect another sign-on bonus. Washington, however decides the punishment is too harsh and so asks "...
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By John Matlock on November 16, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Having spent my time in the Army as a low level grunt I was fascinated to see this story of the view from the bottom of Washington's Army. The eight men whose diaries and letters Dr. Chadwick used as the main basis of the story were not exceptional men, they were just ordinary men in extraordinary times. And they happened to be on the winning side so that their story gets told.

Surprisingly the book makes the life of the grunt surprisingly like that of our own: talking with friends, drinking, playing cards -- bored most of the, time scared the rest -- and it's always too hot, or too cold; too wet or too dusty. It takes some effort to remember things like the quality of medical care, where things like germs, drugs, anesthesia hadn't been discovered/invented yet.

Dr. Chadwick has done a supurb job of research in an area previously ignored. There are many books talking about Washington, the various battles, and so on. This book covers new ground and is great reading.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
17 of 22 people found the following review helpful By P. Hanafin on November 10, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I certainly enjoyed this "bottom-up" look at the revolution. I've read "1776," "His Excellency," and others on the Revolution (and don't get me wrong, those are good books) but this has been the most interesting book I've read on the subject, so far. Because, it follows the ordinary guys. The grunts that I've always figured I would be had I lived in that period. Just what did those guys have to go through? This book gives you a good look. I didn't give it a 5 star rating because at some points in the book, I found it to be repetitive and some of the paragraphs would jump from one subject to another with no real flow. It's knit-picky, I know, but the book could have used a better editor. Other than that, if you like the subject, you'll like this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Aden Zydo on June 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
Bruce Chadwick's First American Army is captivating and interesting, but at the same time, a bit frustrating to read. His concept is relatively simple: Tell the story of the American War of Independence from the perspectives of the "ordinary" men involved rather than from the perspectives of the extraordinary visionaries and leaders of the conflict. The simplicity of the concept, however, does not translate into an easy task for Chadwick. The author correctly understands that his readers will demand, first and foremost, a cohesive account of the war itself. His challenge is in figuring out how to provide that basic chronological narrative through the disjointed and varied experiences of his subjects, the "grunts" on the ground.

The author chose eight individuals (low level enlisted men and officers) who happened to record their experiences, and who had a broad range of involvement and experience in the war. The author almost certainly put an enormous amount of research work into identifying his eight subjects. He successfully identified individuals who's recorded experiences in the war could be woven together to provide the basis for a narrative of the war itself. This, by itself, was a significant achievement for the author--no small task.

However, there was only so far the author could ever go with the experiences of his eight subjects. In order to provide a cohesive overview of the war itself, the author had to infuse these "ground level" accounts of the war with a parallel high level narrative of the war to provide the reader with continuity. The author jumps back and forth between the detailed accounts of his subjects and the general overviews of the progression of the war.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?