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The First Virtue: Double Helix #6 (Star Trek: The Next Generation Book 56) [Kindle Edition]

Michael Jan Friedman , Christie Golden
3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)

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Book Description

An insidious plot for revenge has spanned several years in the life of Jean-Luc Picard, but how did this merciless vendetta get started? Like a double helix curling back on itself, the final answer lies at the very beginning...
A series of terrorist attacks have heightened tensions between two alien races, bringing an entire sector to the brink of interplanetary war. While Picard, captain of the U.S.S. Stargazer, struggles to keep the peace, Lieutenant Commander Jack Crusher must team up with a Vulcan officer named Tuvok to uncover the hidden architect of the attacks, but the outcome of their quest would breed dire consequences for the future.


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Michael Jan Friedman is the author of nearly sixty books of fiction and nonfiction, more than half of which bear the name Star Trek or some variation thereof. Ten of his titles have appeared on the New York Times bestseller list. He has also written for network and cable television, radio, and comic books, the Star Trek: Voyager® episode “Resistance” prominent among his credits. On those rare occasions when he visits the real world, Friedman lives on Long Island with his wife and two sons.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

Thul entered the Reggana city tavern by one of its several revolving doors, his Thallonian commoner's clothes and attached hood uncomfortably rough against his skin.

The place was loud with jangling music and crowded with a surprising number of aliens. Squinting to see through the dim lighting and the acch'ta smoke, he took a look around.

At first, he couldn't find the one he was looking for. Then he heard a familiar laugh and traced it to its owner -- a tall, lean Thallonian youth with an antic sparkle in his eyes and a mouth that seemed ready to break into a grin at any moment. He had clearly had too much to drink.

His companion was an Indarrhi of about the same age. Like most every member of his species, the fellow was slender and as dark as carbon, with deepset silver eyes, a fleecy mop of silver-white hair, and three thick fingers on either hand.

The Indarrhi also had rudimentary empathic powers. Or so it was said of them in the empire.

Spotting an unoccupied table, the governor pulled out a chair and sat down. Then he sat back and watched the Thallonian and the Indarrhi.

"Drink?" asked a gruff but feminine voice.

Thul turned and looked up at a triangular face with a single bifocal eye in the middle of its leathery forehead. A Banyanan, he mused. And this one had even fewer manners than most.

He considered the question that had been posed to him. "Thallonian ale," he decided. "Room temperature."

The waitress grunted. "Room temperature." She sneered, as if it were not very likely his request would be met. Then she turned her angular body sideways and made her way back through the crowd.

Halfway to the bar, she passed the young Thallonian. Winking at the Indarrhi, he grabbed the Banyanan around the waist and drew her to him. But the waitress was stronger than she looked. With a push, she freed herself and continued on her way.

It didn't anger the youth in the least. In fact, it might have been a game he had played with the female before. Laughing out loud, he clapped his companion on the back and lifted a mug to his lips.

The contents, a frothy liquid as dark and scarlet as blood, dripped down the youth's chin and spattered the table below. Wiping himself with the back of his hand, he swung his arm around the Indarrhi's shoulders and whispered something into his friend's rounded ear.

Yes, Thul thought disapprovingly. The Thallonian had definitely had too much to drink.

Suddenly, the youth thrust the Indarrhi away and laughed even more loudly. His companion smiled, appearing to enjoy the joke -- but not with the fervor of the Thallonian. The governor frowned.

The youth was a misfit -- an embarrassment to his species. Whoever had raised him had done a stunningly bad job of imparting Thallonian manners to him. Were it not for his ruddy skin and his size, one might have wondered if he was Thallonian at all.

"Thallonian ale," said a by-now familiar voice.

Thul glanced at the serving woman as she put his drink in front of him. Then he reached into his pocket and produced an imperial disc. "This should be enough," he said.

The Banyanan eyed it, then plucked it from the governor's hand. "It should at that," she responded. Then, with her overly generous payment in hand, she disappeared again.

With the waitress gone, Thul returned his attention to the youth. He was just in time to see the fellow thrust his leg out in the path of a green-skinned Orion trader.

The Orion, who had a mug in his hand, never saw the danger. With a curse, he tripped on the Thallonian's foot and went flying. So did his drink -- into the lap of another Thallonian, a brawny specimen with a sear across the bridge of his nose.

Outraged, the victim rose from his seat and seized the Orion's shirtfront in his fists. With a surge of his powerful muscles, he lifted the trader off the floor.

"Orion scum," he spat.

Releasing the trader with one hand, the Thallonian drew it back and struck the Orion in the face. Thul heard a resounding crack as the trader's head snapped back. A moment later, it lolled on the Orion's shoulder, and the Thallonian let him drop to the floor.

When the trader woke, the governor mused, he would have a headache. A rather considerable headache.

"Damn you!" bellowed the youth, leaping to his feet "That was my friend you hit!"

The Thallonian with the scar glanced at him warily. "The fool spilled his drink in my lap!"

"Only because you tripped him with your big, clumsy feet!" the youth roared at him.

It was anything but the truth, Thul noted inwardly. But, of course, the fellow with the scar had no way of knowing that, and neither did anyone else in the establishment.

"Who are you calling clumsy?" the man with the sear snarled.

"You!" the youth snarled back. "Why? What are you going to do about it, you bulging sack of excrement?"

The older man's eyes popped and his hand went to his hip. "Sack of excrement, is it?" With a flash of metal, he slid a blade out of its scabbard. "How would you like me to cut your tongue out and shove it down your scrawny throat?"

The youth grinned as he whipped his own sword free. "I would like to see you try!" he shot back.

Seeing what was about to take place, the other patrons cleared a space for the two antagonists. The Orion, who was allegedly the cause of the youth's indignation, was the only one who remained in the vicinity -- and that was only because he was still unconscious.

The governor sighed. The youth's behavior was worse than embarrassing. It was despicable. He had actually gone out of his way to pick a fight with an innocent man.

Still, Thul didn't do anything to stop the impending combat. He just sat there like everyone else in the tavern, drinking his ale and wondering who the victor would be.

"Serpent!" boomed the Thallonian with the scar.

"Rodent!" came the youth's reply.

Suddenly, they were at each other, their swords clashing in a blurry web of bright metal. The scarred one thrust and the youth parried it. The youth countered and the scarred man knocked his sword away.

Back and forth they went, knocking tables and chairs aside, slashing away at each other with wild abandon. The scarred one was stronger and steadier, but the youth seemed more skilled. In time, the governor mused, skill was likelier to win out.

His theory was borne out a few moments later. The scarred man saw an opening and brought his sword down at his adversary's head, but what seemed to be an opening turned out to be a trap. The youth sidestepped the blow, then swung his blade at his opponent's shoulder.

The metal cut deeply, eliciting a spray of blood and a cry of pain from the scarred one. Then his enemy struck again, battering the sword from the scarred one's nerveless fingers.

The older man stood there, waiting for the deathstroke that did not come. Instead, the youth smiled and knelt beside the Orion, who had been all but forgotten in the melee.

Some of those present might have expected the youth to drag the trader to his feet, since he had claimed the fellow as his friend. But he didn't do that at all. He merely used the Orion's tunic to wipe his blade clean.

Finally, he stood up again and addressed the scarred one. "Next time," he said grimly, "be careful whose wine you catch in your lap." Then he tossed his head back and howled with laughter until the rafters rang with it.

The scarred man, who was clutching his wounded shoulder, just glared at his adversary. He glanced at the sword he had left lying on the floor, no doubt wondering if he might have a chance at revenge if he moved quickly enough. But in the end, he thought better of it and slunk away.

Remarkable, Thul reflected sourly. The youth had made an art form of arrogance and braggadocio.

Downing the remainder of his ale, the governor got to his feet and crossed the room. When he was halfway to the swordsman, the Indarrhi took note of him and said something.

The youth turned to cast a glance at the governor over his shoulder, his eyes intense in the hollows of their sockets. At the same time, his hand wandered to the hilt of his weapon.

Thul stopped in front of him. For a moment, the youth seemed ready to gut the older man where he stood. Then the governor tossed his hood back, revealing his identity.

Slowly, the fire in the swordsman's eyes dimmed. His features softened and his hand left his hilt. "Father," he said, humor and surprise mingled in his voice -- along with something like distrust.

Thul gazed at him. "Strong drink does not agree with you. You have looked better, Mendan."

The youth grunted scornfully and cast a sidelong glance at his companion. "Have I really?"

"And you have exhibited better manners," the governor went on, unperturbed. "Was it really necessary to create a scene? To wound an innocent man? And all to prove your valor for the hundredth time?"

His son sneered at him. "Among Thallonians, is the first virtue not courage? And are you not the one who taught me that, before I was old enough to eat with a fork?"

Thul nodded. "I did," he conceded. "But one truly confident of his courage does not pick fights to demonstrate it. He knows life will give him plenty of opportunities to show how brave he is."

The youth shot a conspiratorial look at his companion, the Indarrhi. "You see how it is, Wyl? The man is a font of wisdom." Then he turned back to the governor. "I will try my best to remember what you've taught me, Father. I have always tried to remember what you taught me...even if I am only your bastard."

Thul shook his head, knowing Mendan had no intention of remembering anything. "You are my son...the son of a high-ranking Thallonian official. It would be a pleasant surprise if you acted accordingly."

Mendan eyed him. "Why have you come slumming, Father? Do you know how far you are from anything resembling the imperial court?"

Thul's hands clenched into fists at the thought of what had happened at court. With an effort, he unclenched them. "I have come," he said, "because I have a mission for you -- one that cries out for a man who can navigate the underside of society."

The youth's ey...


Product Details

  • File Size: 1379 KB
  • Print Length: 271 pages
  • Publisher: Pocket Books/Star Trek (September 22, 2000)
  • Sold by: Simon and Schuster Digital Sales Inc
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FC0VFM
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  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,106,862 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great conclusion to an excellent set of six novels March 13, 2000
By Ben R
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This story is another wonderful tale in the Star Trek: The Next Generation tradition. It is based in the same wonderful universe as all other star trek books where faster than light travel and communications make galactic journeys possible. Unlike most other Next Generation books, this story does not take place aboard the U.S.S. Enterprise. Instead it is based a few years before the Next Generation series began on the U.S.S. Stargazer, Captain Picard's former ship. There are a few familiar characters though, obviously Captain Picard, and the often spoken of but seldom seen husband of Dr. Beverly Crusher, Lieutenant Commander Jack Crusher. Also joining these two characters is one Vulcan, Ensign Tuvok. If the name sounds familiar to Star Trek: Voyager fans, it is the same as your Lieutenant Tuvok but a few years before his Voyager years. The story is of a mission to the Kellasian sector to try and help defuse the war cries of two races on different worlds brought on by old hatred and recent terrorist attacks. While Picard tries to solve the problem diplomatically, he assigns Crusher and Tuvok to investigate the attacks because he believes they are coming from an outside source. This is the final tale in the series of the plot of a mad man to destroy the entire Federation. Interestingly, this last story is the first chronologically and answers the questions posed by the first five novels about why this mad man has been sending virtually incurable diseases to seemingly random places in the galaxy over a period of nearly a decade. Some of the most interesting parts of the story come when a carefree and impulsive Jack Crusher teams up with the completely logical and reserved Vulcan, Ensign Tuvok. Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A great conclusion to an excellent set of six novels March 13, 2000
By Ben R
Format:Mass Market Paperback
This story is another wonderful tale in the Star Trek: The Next Generation tradition. It is based in the same wonderful universe as all other star trek books where faster than light travel and communications make galactic journeys possible. Unlike most other Next Generation books, this story does not take place aboard the U.S.S. Enterprise. Instead it is based a few years before the Next Generation series began on the U.S.S. Stargazer, Captain Picard's former ship. There are a few familiar characters though, obviously Captain Picard, and the often spoken of but seldom seen husband of Dr. Beverly Crusher, Lieutenant Commander Jack Crusher. Also joining these two characters is one Vulcan, Ensign Tuvok. If the name sounds familiar to Star Trek: Voyager fans, it is the same as your Lieutenant Tuvok but a few years before his Voyager years. The story is of a mission to the Kellasian sector to try and help defuse the war cries of two races on different worlds brought on by old hatred and recent terrorist attacks. While Picard tries to solve the problem diplomatically, he assigns Crusher and Tuvok to investigate the attacks because he believes they are coming from an outside source. This is the final tale in the series of the plot of a mad man to destroy the entire Federation. Interestingly, this last story is the first chronologically and answers the questions posed by the first five novels about why this mad man has been sending virtually incurable diseases to seemingly random places in the galaxy over a period of nearly a decade. Some of the most interesting parts of the story come when a carefree and impulsive Jack Crusher teams up with the completely logical and reserved Vulcan, Ensign Tuvok. Read more ›
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Was this review helpful to you?
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars No that great especially for a mini series. October 5, 1999
By A Customer
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Bad conclusion to wrap up this whole double helix thing. Found the book rather slow and couldn't finish it. Really did not have much that kept you holding. I am good friends with mike friedman and he told me that Christie hogged most of the writing and that was why it was poor.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Back to the future OR Let's conclude with the beginning October 19, 2010
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Easily the best book in this sub-series, this book is the prequel to the rest of the books in the set. It tells the story of why the villain of the series did the things he did, and why he hated the Federation in general and Picard in particular so fervently. The book was saved for the final entry in the series in order to keep the mystery of his identity throughout the series, and I understand the purpose of doing so, but frankly I think that the value gained from maintaining that mystery was not nearly enough to offset the loss to the flow of the series created by not running this book first. The entire series would have made much more sense, and been a much more enjoyable read, had it been run chronologically, with this book as the first entry.

This book is set in the time period in which Picard is the captain of the Stargazer, but not early in his career as captain of the Stargazer when he's still proving himself. He is an established captain here, almost as respected as he later is as captain of the Enterprise.

I have one very minor quibble with this book: the cover art of the edition I have shows Tuvok and a young Beverly Crusher, yet she has essentially no part in this story; the critical characters are Tuvok (on loan from his normal assignment) and JACK Crusher; apparently, the powers that be did not feel that Jack Crusher was a sufficiently recognizable figure to put on the cover, that his picture would not sell any books. That is possibly true, but that's no reason for putting Bev on the cover; for one thing, I'm not sure how many books her picture will sell, either, and for another, if her picture DID sell any books, whoever bought this book because they were a Beverly Crusher fan would have felt significantly cheated, as she makes only a token appearance as the other end of a video call home by Jack. Perhaps Picard and Tuvok would have been a more appropriate pairing.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
2.0 out of 5 stars Read the first 5 only
This book was not necessary to the series. It was done as a prequel and didn't provide much that wasn't already in the other books. I was quite disappointed in it. Read more
Published on July 14, 2012 by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars STAR TREK BOOKS
Here's another great star trek book.

Rondall Banks
Published on July 6, 2008 by Rondall Banks
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent conclusion to the Double Helix Series!
The First Virtue is an excellent conclusion. It pretty much wraps up the reasoning to everything we learned in "Double or Nothing. Read more
Published on July 17, 2002 by K. Wyatt
3.0 out of 5 stars Not the best in the series, more like fourth virtue!
THE PLOT OR PREMISE:
This is the final in the series of six books dealing with an assault with biological weapons on the Federation. Read more
Published on March 4, 2001 by Paul Sadler
3.0 out of 5 stars Not particularily empressive
I cannot help but think that this book is ridiculously boring. I did not care at all about characters (except perhaps that of some terrorists). Read more
Published on September 5, 2000 by Thorn
4.0 out of 5 stars More background on the U.S.S. Stargazer and its crew
This story explains why there were so many viruses spread across the quardant. This story gives even more background on the Stargazer, and has special guest star, Tuvok.
Published on June 10, 2000 by Mel Orr
3.0 out of 5 stars Plot problems (3 stars so far)
It may be a bit premature for me to give a review of this book, but I think it needs to be reviewed somewhere in the first fifty or so pages. Read more
Published on January 20, 2000 by David D McKeehan
2.0 out of 5 stars Terrible Conclusion!
I thought this book made a discrace of the Double Helix series! Nothing compelled me to actually finish it. I stopped around page 100 for a while and then finished it. Read more
Published on December 16, 1999 by Nate Goodrich
3.0 out of 5 stars Average story
The story here tells the reason why the plague was started. Tuvok gets recruited and has to work with Picard and Jack Crusher. Read more
Published on September 3, 1999
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