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The Fist of God Mass Market Paperback – July 1, 1995


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The Fist of God + The Fourth Protocol + The Deceiver
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 592 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam (July 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0553572423
  • ISBN-13: 978-0553572421
  • Product Dimensions: 4.3 x 1.4 x 6.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (112 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #343,453 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A British agent discovers Saddam Hussein has a secret weapon in this latest thriller from the author of The Day of the Jackal.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

In yet another espionage thriller from the best-selling author of The Fourth Protocol (Viking, 1984), the good guys are out to prevent Saddam Hussein from using a most powerful weapon.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

This is beautifully crafted, well researched story.
Kabelo
His storytelling skills, interesting characters, and interesting subject matter all prove to make one excellent book.
Zanto
There are spies involved in the plot who are selling information about Iraq.
Andy

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 55 people found the following review helpful By Laura Haggarty on June 11, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I don't normally read spy thrillers of this type, and this was the first of Forsyth's books I've read, but I loved it! I grabbed this book from my husband one day when I was bored, and was drawn in immediately by the tense prose and gripping plotline. I won't give a synopsis, you can get that above. But I will say I read this almost straight through from start to finish.
No one seems to know how much of this novel is really true, and in the end, that doesn't matter, because it's writen so well that it might as well be true. The plot is crafted around a war that really happened, and the author spoke with those who had taken part in the war, giving his work an authenticity hard to match. If you're looking for an intelligent novel of this genre, then this one is hard to beat. Don't hesitate!
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Eric V. Moye on November 16, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
There is a reason why so many other reviewers rave about this book. Just like his earlier works, from "The Day of the Jackal"' to "The Devil's Alternative", he keeps the reader turning the pages. Even though we know going in that Iraq loses in the end, it is an incredibly compelling story. It may be Forsyth's best read ever.
F. Forsyth is a master of suspense novels, taking factual bases and turning them into riveting stories. This is as great as any of his earlier works. The plot twists are stunning.
His research is the equal of Tom Clancy's. His writing style is so much tighter, and there does not seem to be a single wasted word. If you have an early morning meeting, or something else that must be done, DO NOT start this book.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Rennie Petersen on July 7, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
"The Fist of God" is an international/military thriller based on the first Gulf War in 1991 (and the prelude in the last half of 1990), when the USA and a large number of coalition countries forced Iraq to withdraw from Kuwait. I liked the book a lot, especially the first half. The last half of the book begins to drag, and one ends up feeling that it is too long and that Frederick Forsyth himself was a bit tired of it by the time he reached the end.

This story works very well at two levels - a high level conflict and various individual conflicts. The high level conflict involves Iraq's invasion of Kuwait and the build-up to the Gulf War and the decisions being made by President Bush Sr. and Margaret Thatcher and the CIA and the British MI6. This conflict is very exciting, even though we know the final result: a coalition victory and Iraq's withdrawal from Kuwait.

The individual conflicts consist of the fights between the various good guys and the Iraqi soldiers and agents of the Iraqi secret service and Iraqi counter-intelligence. There are also some Israeli Mossad agents involved just to make things more complicated.

At the individual conflicts level the main good guy is Mike Martins, a British SAS soldier who is recruited by MI6 and who is inserted into occupied Kuwait and later into Baghdad. Mike Martins' adventures are certainly exciting enough, but it seems too contrived that the same hero gets sent on three different missions. In particular, pulling Mike Martins out of Kuwait to send him to Baghdad has the negative effect of making the Kuwait operation seem unimportant. Similarly, his escape from Baghdad just at the time when someone is needed for a third mission is too big a coincidence.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 16, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Frederick Forsyth has for a long time been the hand that has penned some of the greatest espionage thrillers ever written. But with the Fist of God, he definitely defines himself as the master of his craft. He weaves fact with his own fiction so deftly that you never know whether the Gulf War might actually have been the way it was in his book. The escapades of Mike Martin will keep you turning the pages right until the end, a brilliant climax of the best literary tension blended with credible action. A definite read for all Forsyth fans.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By D. F SHAFER on September 17, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Just before finding "The Fist of God" in a pile of beach books while on vacation, I read Forsyth's latest book "The Afghan" - see my Amazon review please. As soon as I picked up Fist I felt like a found a old friend. Here was Mike Martin in his best yet SAS role - before his retirement! This book is all about the intelligent and special ops that led up to the first Gulf war - we take back Kuwait but leave Saddam running Iraq.

Forsyth may be singlehandedly responsible for the 2nd Gulf war. If George Bush, George Tenet and Donald Rumsfeld got this book mixed up with their intelligence reports then it is possible that this is where the threat of weapons of mass destruction originated after the first Gulf war. The book is very credible from the design of the Calutrons to the excellent camouflage developed by the Russians. Not without errors - US pilot training in 1983 did NOT still have the T-33 but the T-37. I flew a T-33 in training in 1966. At that time it was replaced in Undergraduate Pilot Training with the T-37. And ,when listing the planes that did major damage to the Iraqi armored columns, Forsyth left out the A-10 Warthog - the deadliest tank and convoy buster in the inventory. The A-10 brought a new dimension to the term "shooting gallery"!

Overall, this book is a very worthwhile read. Get a copy and put it on your night stand. After the first five pages you will not be able to put it down!
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