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The Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy (The Schocken Bible, Volume 1) Paperback – February 8, 2000


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The Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy (The Schocken Bible, Volume 1) + Myths from Mesopotamia: Creation, the Flood, Gilgamesh, and Others (Oxford World's Classics)
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Product Details

  • Series: Schocken Bible (Book 1)
  • Paperback: 1056 pages
  • Publisher: Schocken; 1st Pbk. Ed edition (February 8, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805211195
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805211191
  • Product Dimensions: 9.8 x 7.1 x 2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (53 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,442 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Based on the Buber-Rosenzweig translation of the Hebrew Bible, completed in 1960, Fox's new rendering of Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy is a breathtaking translation that captures the beautiful, majestic, and dynamic character of biblical Hebrew. In his translation, Fox (Jewish studies, Clark Univ.) lovingly caresses the language of the Bible so that readers may listen to it as it was heard and read by its earliest Jewish audience. Listen, for example, to his rendering of Exodus 3:14, the encounter between God and Moses: "God said to Moshe:/Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh/I will be-there howsoever I will be there." Fox provides keen and insightful notes and commentary, and the introductions to each book are crisp and fresh. The Five Books of Moses demonstrates the living character of scripture in the modern world. An essential purchase for all libraries.
Henry L. Carrigan Jr., Westerville P.L., Ohio
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"A binding religious text, a historical document of the first importance, and a work of great literary imagination." --Edward Hirsch, New York Times Book Review

"Fox's translation has the rare virtue of making constantly visible in English the Hebraic quality of the original, challenging preconceptions of what the Bible is really like. A bracing protest against the bland modernity of all the recent English versions of the Bible." --Robert Alter, professor of comparative literature, University of California, Berkeley

"No serious Bible reader--whether Jewish, Christian, or secular--can afford to ignore this volume." --Jon D. Levenson, Harvard Divinity School

Customer Reviews

This book is a refreshing read and I highly recommend it!!
J.L. Populist
The hard cover edition I have is very handsomely printed in easy to read type, fine paper, with some black and white illuminations to start the books.
Craig Matteson
Everett Fox's translation of the Torah is plain and simple the finest translation from Hebrew I have ever seen.
Amitai Adler

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

125 of 125 people found the following review helpful By Amitai Adler on November 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
Everett Fox's translation of the Torah is plain and simple the finest translation from Hebrew I have ever seen. None of the other notable English translations, from the JPS Tanakh to the excellent Bloch translation of Song of Songs even comes close to the power and faithfulness of Fox's Five Books of Moses. He comes as close as is linguistically possible to capturing the rhythm, nuance, and grace of the Hebrew original as is possible in another langage. Furthermore, when he knows that pure translation will be insufficient to capture a play on words-- how many native English readers even know the Bible is full of plays on words?-- he provides transliterations of the relevant Hebrew phrases as well, so the device becomes apparent.

Some have complained that in forcing the English language to follow the patterns of a different grammatical system-- to say nothing of worldview-- he has twisted even poetic English beyond recognition. But not only is this text highly readable poetry, it reinforces with every word the nearly-always neglected fact that the Tanakh (the "Old Testament") was not written in English, or Latin, or Greek, and represents a vastly different set of literary (and religious) endeavors than the Christian scriptures. It forcefully gives the reader a much-needed reminder that this is not the book you think it is.

Most translations, in smoothing the text out into English prose and poetry, either sacrifice accuracy (e.g. the King James), or sacrifice the poetry (e.g. the JPS, which contains some of the least poetic poetry I can think of), resulting in an anemic set of verses bearing little resemblence to the wild, vibrant song of the Hebrew original. Fox's unique word-flow unpacks the dense Hebrew into a torrent of breathtaking imagery (e.g.
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66 of 69 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on June 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Schocken Press has undertaken an ambitious project, to retranslate the Bible into modern language capturing the sound and quality of idiom of the original languages as much as possible. The first volume of this project is available in The Five Books of Moses, Shocken Bible: Volume I, translated and with commentary by Everett Fox.
'Based upon principles developed by Martin Buber and Franz Rosenzweig, this new English translation restores the poetics of the Hebrew original--the echoes, allusions, alliterations, and word-plays that rhetorically underscore its meaning and are intrinsic to a text meant to be read aloud and heard.' The underlying premise of most translations of the Bible have been to clarify the meaning of the text. While this is certainly not overlooked here, it can be the case that in the pursuit of textual clarity, the ability to make it audibly intelligible gets lost -- a lot of passages from the New Revised Standard Version, for instance, are so precise in construction that they defy oral expression.
Fox says in his Translator's Preface: 'I have presented the text in English dress but with a Hebraic voice.' Careful attention has been given to rhythm and sound. Too many English translations overlook the auditory quality of the words, and while striving to capture the idea of the text, they miss the crucial 'hearing cues' that an oral rendering would give the listener.
To this end, the text is printed as if it were in blank verse (save where a poetic style was already present and could be carried forward). Proper nouns (the names of persons and places) retain their Hebraic forms; odd, though, that the title of the book is The Five Books of Moses rather than The Five Books of Moshe. Also, a principle of the 'leading-word' is employed here.
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47 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Tim Lieder on May 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
While this is the most authentic and poetic translation of the Torah, the five books of the Bible that Jews hold as sacred but Christians & Muslims see as a lot of rules and stories that served as the basis for their guy, it can be read by anyone.
Everett Fox does an amazing job of capturing the Hebrew syntax and poetry down to repeating words which are repeated in the context and bring more insights than many translations which gloss over the word plays.(like the fact that Moses' "basket" and Noah's "ark" is the same word. Or that it is the REED sea not the red sea.)
But the most important part of this book is the fact that it makes the "boring" parts of the Bible exciting and vibrant. You will never badmouth Leviticus, Numbers or Deuteronomy again after you read this translation. Trust me.
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27 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Andre Lawrence TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on June 29, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Until recently, I was unaware of the competing versions of the Bible by Biblical scholars Dr. Robert Alter and Dr. Everett Fox. Both have authored many books and critical essays about the Bible, culminating with parallel academic versions of The Torah (interestingly, they both chose the title, "The Five Books of Moses."), biography of David's life (both chose to use 1,2 Samuel) and both offered competing translations of Genesis.

The good news is, is that both men offer surprisingly interesting renditions of these books. I was especially please to recently receive Dr. Fox' version of the Torah after having Dr. Alters for two months.

Both books offer slightly different translations along with the running commentary, Dr. Fox' reserves most of his at the beginning of each book, but what stands out is perhaps cadence.

Dr. Fox' is a bit easier to read. Yes, he does substitute/ replace the English/ Latin names with the original Hebrew names. I also found his line of reasoning an interesting contrast to Dr. Alter-- 21st century Talmudic debate!

The soft cover is very durable, but it is heavy to carry. It is also printed in large fonts.

If you're like me, not crazy about the JPS standard version and you want a lively Chumash, I strongly recommend this version. Do I recommend this over Dr. Alter's? No. It's like hearing "Our Love is Here To Stay" and loving Sinatra's version, but also loving Louie Armstrong's.
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