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53 of 58 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon November 21, 2009
This book would be a good resource for parents or anyone else working with children. If you've read the basic book "The Five Love Languages" however, there really isn't much new here in the way of principle. The authors just take the core concepts of the five love languages and state them in terms that pertain to children. The difference then, and the value of this book, is in the focused application. Is it worth the money spent and the time required to read it? I believe so. While the basic love languages are easy enough to learn, the key is in the application of those love languages to the various relationships of life. Words of affirmation, quality time, receiving gifts, acts of service, and physical touch all translate in different ways depending on the relationship. If you're dealing with children in any capacity, this book will not disappoint you.
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34 of 39 people found the following review helpful
on January 31, 2011
After reading Gary Chapman's original Five Love Languages, I was thoroughly impressed and put the advice to work in my own marriage immediately with almost instant positive results. I could hardly wait to finish the book so I could dig into The Five Love Languages of Children.

For the most part, the book offers good advice. If you didn't come from a family where your "love tank" was full and you are unsure how to go about helping your child feel loved, this book truly is an excellent resource. If you are a conservative Christian who is anti-divorce and believes children can never recover emotionally from divorce and that single-parent families are sub-par, you won't really have any complaints with this book. In fact, you'll probably give it five stars. Similarly, if you have a supportive family and/or church family, you'll also find comfort in these pages.

However, if you came from a painful background yourself, you happen not to be Christian, or you are a divorced or single parent, you might have a few hesitations and find yourself feeling a major disconnect, particularly toward the last quarter of the book. Campbell emphasizes church involvement, and often cites Scripture. At one point, Campbell tells the story of a boy whose parents divorced when he was 9. The boy and his brothers supposedly grew up never feeling like their situation was abnormal in any way, and now he and his brothers are all happily married. The reader is led to believe this is the result of the family "[coming] under Christian influence" following the divorce and having "received Christ as their Savior". Aside from this rosy story, Campbell seems to paint the outlook for children of divorce as grim at best, saying that the trauma of divorce is more detrimental to a child than the death of a parent and citing a study which indicates that the negative emotions surrounding the split of their parents are often still going strong at least ten years later. Either these stories conflict, or Campbell is basically proselytizing in a roundabout manner. What I drew from this is that Campbell is suggesting that, if you're going to inflict the pain and suffering of divorce on your child, first feel miserably guilty about destroying them, then seek Jesus as your Savior immediately so your child can grow up and avoid being a statistic.

I should point out that I am married, that my husband is the father of both of my children, that we all live under the same roof, and that my husband and I are equally involved in the lives of our children - and Campbell still manages to offend me.

Bottom line: The Five Love Languages of Children is a good book with good advice. It is thought-provoking in mostly positive ways and will offer some insight - especially for parents who did not have such wonderful examples in life growing up. But Campbell seems to have a pointed agenda, which some may find comforting and others may find blatantly offensive. The book would have been much better if Chapman had left Campbell out of it. I think you can gather all you need to know by reading the original Five Love Languages, and some other parenting books specific to your own personal challenges, and thus I would not necessarily recommend this book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on October 22, 2012
I heard great things about this book so I got excited and purchased it. Then I started reading and he suggested that you can't really tell the love languages until your kids are like 4 or 5. Molly is 2 so I kind of lost interest. Maybe I'll try it again a little later. The idea still makes sense to me.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 15, 2013
Although this is a great book, I feel like if you've read the "regular" Five Love Languages book, this could have been a 40 page tack on. The biggest takeaways I took were the changing languages your child could experience, and that you shouldn't try to identify your child's language before 5ish.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 20, 2013
This is a good book about the way children communicate love and what kind of love they need. Since I have read the first Love Languages book, I did get a little bored.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 15, 2015
As a pastor and marriage enthusiast, I have long been an advocate for Gary Chapman's "The Five Love Languages," a paradigm for understanding the effectiveness and meaning of our expressions of love which features prominently in the way my wife and I talk about our love for each other and the way that we provide premarital counseling. To be sure, it has some limitations. It's a bit overly simplistic at times and can provide the means for us to pigeonhole ourselves and others within our designated primary or secondary love language. But I advocate the love languages idea for everyone to learn and consider, and I'd happily recommend the book to anyone interested in learning how to communicate love better in any relationship.

As much as I'm a love language apologist, I've always been puzzled by the onslaught of love language subthemes, ranging from "The Five Love Languages for Men" and "The Five Love Languages: Singles Edition" to "The Five Love Languages for Septuagenarian Swedish Kayakers." I wondered how each of these editions could possibly offer sufficiently new insights to warrant the publication of so many similar books. After diving into "The Five Love Languages of Children" to try to better leverage the love language idea in my parenting, my concern was partially validated.

In short, "The Five Love Languages of Children" is frequently overly familiar to the point of boredom for those who have read the original book. Yes, the authors provide some more specific descriptions of how the love languages are expressed most meaningfully for children, but much of that clarification and specification was either intuitive or merely worth an article, rather than an entire book. And, then, towards the end of the book, seemingly as a means to justify the publication of the book, there were several chapters that made virtually no mention of the love language idea but were instead focused on discipline of children and other random parenting topics. Some of the content in those final pages was moderately helpful, but it seemed like a tangential add-on, being so disconnected from the love language material.

In short, I finished this book a few weeks ago, and I can't remember a single new idea from the entire thing. For anyone who hasn't encountered the love languages stuff, this book offers a reasonable summary and starting point, though I'd recommend simply reading the original book instead. And the children-specific content of this book was insufficiently memorable and meaningful to allow me to recommend it with anything more than the luke-warmest of enthusiasm.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2014
I liked the idea behind this book, but I felt that the writing was lacking. Many of the quotes from children appear contrived as neither the sentence structure nor the vocabulary appeared to be age appropriate. I also felt that the colloquialisms uses in the section with the modern rancher and his son were overdone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on February 28, 2015
it's christian based and opinionated and built up a little. i haven't been overly excited about any of the concepts yet. the stories and testimonies seem exaggerated. but it has some practical insight and application. im halfway through and i plan to finish it because this book hasn't completely weirded me out yet.
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I really liked the first half of this book that actually dealt with recognizing children's love language. I thought the second half was just filler.
I read this book because a couple weeks ago one of my son was upset because I didn't love him. Or so he said. I figured I needed to figure out what his love language was so I could meet his needs. I still haven't totally figured out what his love language is but I'm working on meeting all 5 languages for all my 5 children: quality time, gifts, acts of service, words or affirmation and physical touch
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on January 5, 2013
This book created some very good discussion and has some really good ideas for parenting. It does seem to assume that life is simple and things are black and white, but with the focus on love, it's not actually a bad thing.
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