Industrial-Sized Deals Best Books of the Month Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon $5 Albums Storm Fire TV Stick Grocery Find the Best Purina Pro Plan for Your Pet Shop Popular Services Home Theater Setup Plumbing Services Assembly Services Shop all tmnt tmnt tmnt  Amazon Echo Fire HD 6 Kindle Voyage The Walking Dead\ Shop Now Deal of the Day
Buy Used
$3.98
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Five Pillars of TQM: How to Make Total Quality Management Work for You (Truman Talley) Paperback – December 1, 1995

14 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$5.04 $0.01

Rising Strong by Brené Brown
Rising Strong
Check out one of this month’s featured new releases in Business & Money by Brené Brown. Learn more | See related books

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Creech, a retired U.S. Air Force general, argues persuasively that in order to remain competitive and combat Japanese incursions into U.S. markets, corporate America must adopt the five principles of total quality management (TQM): product, process, organization, leadership and commitment. In this sensible study, consultant Creech explains how non-statisticians can comprehend and apply TQM methods, which require a humanistic orientation, empowerment on all levels and a holistic approach that involves the entire organization. TQM's decentralization calls for an emphasis on teams that serves as an antidote to the stultifying effects of centralized control. Creech maintains that TQM is best understood in the light of the writings of Peter Drucker, W. Edwards Deming and Joseph Juran, whose work is viewed "by the Japanese to be mainly responsible for the economic recovery of their country after World War II." Numerous detailed corporate and military case studies enrich this comprehensive, often persuasive brief.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

A noted and successful practitioner of Total Quality Management (TQM), Creech believes that TQM leadership in a centralized organization is the object lesson for business today. To this end he has been able to demonstrate his successes and those of other organizations. He effectively presents the theories and insights of Peter Drucker, W. Edwards Deming, Joseph Juran, Philip Crosby, and other notables. The book is informative and replete with examples. It falls short, though, of the promise of its subtitle. TQM is not a "paint by number" road to success, and Creech's polemic on centralization is overdone. Centralization, like democracy or communism, is in itself neither right nor wrong. Creech's assessment that "a holistic TQM system is a proven answer to the realities of the 90s" is, however, on the mark. The book should be on the reading list for quality professionals.
- Steven Silkunas, Southeastern Pennsylvania TA, Philadelphia
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Truman Talley
  • Paperback: 560 pages
  • Publisher: Plume (December 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452271029
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452271029
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,882,522 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Leslie D. Fink on May 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
What I like about Creech's approach to TQM and more effective organizational management & leadership, is his emphasis on the need to attend to all five pillars of TQM: Product, Process, Organization, Leadership, and Commitment. If you try to improve piecemeal (as so many have), the results will be minor improvement. It is only when you get all five pillars in alignment that you start to get dramatically better results. Also, his specific advice makes so much sense: Organizations need to get a clearer picture of what constitutes quality in their product or service; they need to organize the work process with small teams as much as possible; they need to provide much more training, from the CEO on down; they need to provide clear feedback on how well the organization is doing ("scoreboarding"); etc. One other reviewer is right: Now that I have read this book, I find myself looking around for evidence of TQM practices by the employees every time I interact with an organization. It is amazing what differences you can see in organizational performance, once you are sensitized and start looking for them.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Kirsten Ruth Bayes on October 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
A convincingly argued book on how to bring leadership to all levels of a company. Not so much a book about TQM, but more about what separates great organisations from those which are simply "OK". There are so many books at the moment seeking to answer this question - this one actually does (but may well be missed by those looking for it because of its title).
Written by someone who has actually "been there, done that". Unfortunately because Bill Creech was not an academic (only a former four star general!) he does spend more time than necessary establishing his credentials. It is also four years old and this shows in the examples it uses.
Nevertheless, it is one of those books whose ideas will stay with you. Once you have read it, your view of business will never be quite the same again.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By B. E. Harris on May 1, 1998
Format: Paperback
The Five Pillars of TQM is an excellent book on how to stucture and manage an organization for success. Mr. Creech captures in one book everything I have been looking for, but not found, in countless other books, magazines, journals, and training courses. There are some spots where it becomes a bit wordy, but the nuggets of knowledge in between are worth every page.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Maj Gen Jerry Holmes on March 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
General Bill Creech's turnaround of the Air Force's Tactical Air Command is nothing short of miraculous. He did it through the application of the basic canons he developed and so eloquently describes in his book, The Five Pillars of TQM. His book is the textbook we use for our leadership and management course that I developed and teach for engineering seniors and graduate students at The University of Oklahoma. General Creech's approach to management has become the benchmark by which we measure every case we study. The student's analyses of problems in our case studies always ask, "What would General Creech do"? Two years ago when we brought in a new Dean of the College of Engineering, he launched a change program toward a new vision and new goals. General Creech's book, The Five Pillars of TQM became every Department Chair's guide for achieving the new vision and goals. Additionally, for the past two years, faculty and staff from colleges and staff agencies across the campus of the University of Oklahoma have been lining up for our series of leadership seminars using General Creech's Five Pillars as the text.
The way General Creech got everybody involved and the way he created leaders at every level during his turnaround of Tactical Air Command allowed him to take full advantage of the vast human resources and ingenuity in his huge organization. His leadership of this monumental effort caught on like a religious revival. Everybody wanted to be a part of this winning organization-the largest in the Air Force. When the leaders of government and industry took notice, TAC became the standard of excellence for the entire Department of Defense.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Richard M Dix, MD, JD on September 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
One of the unique qualities of this "Five Pillars" book is that it covers in detail the contributions of all the early "quality pioneers"--including Juran, Deming, Feigenbaum, and Crosby. It also covers the works of others who have contributed to our knowledge on "management" matters writ large--not just the far more narrowly focused "quality control" literature. For example, the works of Drucker, Iacocca, and the like are also covered and blended with those of the quality pioneers. The "Five Pillars" praises Deming for what he contributed to the quality movement, but also places his contributions in their needed perspective for those seeking real and not superficial results. Accordingly, it is not suprising that one Balaji S. Reddi from Pune, Maharashtra, India would not like the book. It will be noted that Balaji S. Reddie is an electrical engineer who specializes in teaching the "Deming Way." In fact his e-mail address places him at "DemingIndia.org." Within the pages of the "Five Pillars of TQM" the prediction is made that the book will draw flak from those who have turned Deming into "The Man Who Discovered Quality" and the "patron saint" of quality management. It took a long time for the flak to arrive, and then all the way from India! In fact, a deciple of Walter Shewhart of the Bell Laboratories along with Joseph Juran, W. Edwards Deming made contributions of the "SPC" and "SQC" variety of "QM" but provided false and irrelevant guidance on most of the broader management issues.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: leadership