The Five Stages of Collapse: Survivors' Toolkit and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$14.81
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $5.14 (26%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Trade in your item
Get a $2.00
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Five Stages of Collapse: Survivors' Toolkit Paperback


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.81
$10.22 $8.00

Frequently Bought Together

The Five Stages of Collapse: Survivors' Toolkit + Reinventing Collapse: The Soviet Experience and American Prospects
Price for both: $28.74

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: New Society Publishers (May 28, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0865717362
  • ISBN-13: 978-0865717367
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #94,645 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Review, Charlie Smith, Straight.com July 1, 2013
Five Stages of Collapse is a highly entertaining and enlightening examination of the entrails of what happens when societies are driven into the abyss by greedy, hard-hearted elites and corrupt and incompetent politicians.
And if Orlov turns out to be correct, this book just might end up saving your life by revealing steps you can take to prepare for the worst.

Review, Carolyn Baker, Speaking Truth to Power April 7,2013

I am a huge fan of Dmitry’s work, and I must concur with Richard Heinberg who says, “Even if I believed collapse were impossible I’d still read everything Dmitry Orlov writes: he’s that entertaining.” Incisive articulation of reality tempered with irrepressible humor and sarcasm define his writing style and not only compel us to stay with what some describe as a “dark Russian perspective,” but reveal a man who has found a way to live with what is so and navigate it with buoyant humanity.

The Five Stages of Collapse is nothing less than a definitive textbook for a hypothetical course entitled “The Collapse Of Industrial Civilization 101” or perhaps a bible of sorts for an imaginary “Institute of Collapse Studies.” While to my knowledge no such courses or organizations presently exist, this book would be an essential aspect of any such entity’s credibility.


Review, Michael C. Ruppert, April 18, 2013

The writing of this book was a rotten job, but it was absolutely necessary. If someone had to do it, I am very glad that it was Dmitry Orlov. Without his wit, alacrity and experience, the task of beating the horse of the Cartesian approach to understanding our dying world to death would have resulted in something unbearably maddening, dry and uninspiring. In this book he sneaks some LOLROF side-splitters in when you least expect them. One gathers from Orlov’s painstaking efforts, the futility of looking to outdated constructs and philosophies for understanding and relief from a crisis that demands complete innovation and inspiration.

Reading closely, one sees Orlov carefully planting seeds of reconciliation with our planet and each other throughout—as a fundamental baseline. He arrives at places outside the box of the current meme by using methodologies and analyses that are sacramental within the meme. That’s an achievement. Perhaps in his next book he will stand on that ground more forcefully and tell us what he sees. We don’t need to understand collapse right now as much as we need to survive it. And that is where Dmitry Orlov rises through the rubble and gives us magnificent gems like this: “At the rock bottom of human survival, there is no individual and there is no state; there is only the family, or, if there isn’t, there is something that’s not quite human—or there is nothing at all."


Profound insight combined with wry humor is such an incendiary weapon I am tempted to call The Five Stages of Collapse an "Orlov Cocktail." His delivery of hard truths laced with irony saturates us in seldom reported but extremely relevant facts about the world. He is one of the best writers on the scene today, working at the top of his game. There is more to enjoy in this book with every page you turn, and in very uncertain times, Orlov's advice is, at its core, kind-spirited and extraordinarily helpful.
---Albert Bates, author, The Biochar Solution

Even if I believed collapse were impossible I’d still read everything Dmitry Orlov writes: he’s that entertaining. Unfortunately, however, collapse of some sort or other, of some degree or another, is almost guaranteed. Orlov does us all a great service by teasing apart the kinds and degrees of collapse so that we can prepare for what is likely and “dig in our heels” to prevent what is unsurvivable.
---Richard Heinberg, Senior Fellow, Post Carbon Institute, Author, The End of Growth

From the Back Cover


A Do-It-Yourself Guide to Financial, Commercial,Political, Social and Cultural Collapse

…one of the best writers on the scene today, working at the top of his game. There is more to enjoy in this book with every page you turn, and in very uncertain times, Orlov’s advice is, at its core, kind-spirited and extraordinarily helpful. Albert Bates, author, The Biochar Solution

When thinking about political paralysis, looming resource shortages and a rapidly changing climate, many of us can do no better than imagine a future that is just less of the same. But it is during such periods of profound disruption that sweeping cultural change becomes inevitable. In The Five Stages of Collapse, Dmitry Orlov posits a taxonomy of collapse, suggesting that if the first three stages (financial, commercial and political) are met with the appropriate personal and social transformations, then the worst consequences of social and cultural collapse can be avoided.

Drawing on a detailed examination of both pre- and post-collapse societies, The Five Stages of Collapse provides a unique perspective on the typical characteristics of highly resilient communities. Both successful and unsuccessful adaptations are explored in the areas of finance, commerce, self-governance, social organization and culture. Case studies provide a wealth of specifics for each stage of collapse, focusing on the Icelanders, the Russian Mafia, the Pashtuns of Central Asia, the Roma of nowhere in particular and the Ik of East Africa.

The Five Stages of Collapse provides a wealth of practical information and a long list of to-do items for those who wish to survive each stage with their health, sanity, friendships, family relationships and sense of humor intact. Shot through with Orlov’s trademark dark humor, this is an invaluable toolkit for crafting workable post-collapse solutions at the scale of the family and the community.

…Orlov does us all a great service by teasing apart the kinds and degrees of collapse so that we can prepare for what is likely and “dig in our heels” to prevent what is unsurvivable. Richard Heinberg, Senior Fellow, Post Carbon Institute, author, The End of Growth

Dmitry Orlov was born in Leningrad and immigrated to the United States in the 1970’s. He is the author of Reinventing Collapse, Hold Your Applause! and Absolutely Positive, and publishes weekly at the phenomenally popular blog ClubOrlov.com.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I really liked the writing style used in this book, and all is well explained and very convincing.
ap
I would also say, this book is for the strong, and if you can read it without flinching, my guess is your survival down the road is more likely.
Mark A. Lytle
There wasn't much discussion on Environmental collapse which may be too big for humanity to overcome.
Glenn Stanisewski

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

65 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Kitsapcamper on May 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
So, the topic is bleak (where we're headed as a planet and species), what you can do about it (realistically, not much), when it will go to hell (um....it has - the tea leaves are stewing now and are not especially difficult to read) BUT Orlov writes in a style that is both anecdotal and well researched. It may sound like a strange comparison but Orlov is to civilization collapse in the same way Bill Bryson is to travel writing - deep, interesting, nuanced and humorous (in the "dry like Arizona" way)with plenty of facts, observations and comparisons to give it depth.

I disagree with the 2-star review. The societal comparisons are necessary to frame the possible range of responses that societies will take and I suspect ALL referenced types will be found in various degrees depending on where you reside.

Now the subject - Orlov balances the topics well and provides a useful taxonomy to follow. I was bogged down in the Political Collapse section but only because of my attention span on politics in general these days. I never imagined that the congressional gridlock out of DC would hasten the irrelevancy of Federal level U.S. politics as it has.

As an ironic side note.....I was reading Orlov's section on **when** collapse may occur and was smack in the middle of his "when do you know a bridge will collapse?" analogy when the news of the I-5 bridge tumbling into the Skagit River in Washington State hit the ticker. Fortunately no one was killed but I think it crushed a black swan that happened to be floating by......
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Mark A. Lytle on June 4, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
From time to time, you come upon a very knowledgeable and broad thinker who decides to spill out something he's been chewing on for a good long while, and the results show the completeness of understanding that a long digestion gives you. The book is broad in it's approach, covering many recent societies who have undergone some level of collapse.

Far from a dry read, Dmitry had me chuckling quite often. You can feel a stoic, dry humour throughout, something that feels like it's probably a very Russian take on life. Culturally rich, it's a walk around the world.

Now, Dmitry doesn't sugar-coat anything, and I like that. If you are really, really fed up with American Pollyanna journalism, this book is for you. I would also say, this book is for the strong, and if you can read it without flinching, my guess is your survival down the road is more likely. Not certain of course, but better than those that can't handle this style of writing or content.

In general outline, he offers a taxonomy of societies in distress, and gives some anecdotal measures to get a read on where in this process that a nation or culture is at the moment. On this basis, it's clear the U.S. is not as far through this as it's citizens might like to think. Although there are many good American analyses of current and future trends, coming from a thousand year old culture does have some clear advantages in terms of knowing what's really going on.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By streber on May 30, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Being of two worlds, one of which has already collapsed, Dimitri offers unique insights.

I'm retired, spend lots of time surfing, researching, speculating in futures mkts, reading.
Matters little to me whether I like or dislike the unraveling of events.
To survive in the financial jungle only reality counts.

Lots of reality and new ideas here.

I state without hesitation that this is by far the best book re collapse.

Jared Diamond's writings are excellent but of long gone societies.

Dimitri is applicable to our era...like no other out there.

Enjoy!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
28 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Richard H. Burkhart on June 9, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
According to Dmitry Orlov, the financial collapse of 2008 could be but a mild precursor to a full scale societal collapse that could end with the survivors leading Hobbesian lives: "nasty, brutish, and short", illustrated by the starving Ik tribe of Uganda after its territory was converted to a national park. Along the way mafia rule might seem pretty good in lieu of a functional government, or perhaps a mild outlaw existence of the gypsy type.

Orlov's Russian cynicism of government seems pervasive, except for the example of Iceland, which was small and nimble enough to escape from the clutches of big money. A professed anarchist, he defines anarchism as absence of hierarchy. Thus he holds up the example of Pashtun society as exemplifying many of his ideals, with councils of elders making most community decisions, supplemented by direct democracy on special occasions, all held together by strong clan and family codes of honor.

But people aware of cycles of revenge in many honor bound societies may be less enthusiastic. Nor have anarchists demonstrated how to run a large society without organizational hierarchy (explicit delegation of authority), regardless of the method for making political decisions. Nor even a practical method of direct democracy for large societies, let alone one that would work better than a good representative democracy.

Thus Orlov's collapse scenario would take us back to a very primitive existence, not just pre-industrial. Some how he imagines such an existence could support artists and intellectuals, but it is never explained how this would be economically possible. Even the city states he holds up as good examples had well defined hierarchies.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Product Images from Customers

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search
ARRAY(0xa495ecc0)