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The Flipside of Feminism: What Conservative Women Know -- and Men Can't Say Kindle Edition

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Length: 245 pages

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About the Author

A former teacher-turned-social critic, Suzanne Venker is an author and speaker on politics, marriage, parenting, and the culture. A well-known commentator on cultural issues, Suzanne has appeared on ABC, CNN, FOX, Huff-Po Live and C-Span--as well as hundreds of radio shows throughout the country, including the Laura Ingraham Show. How to Choose a Husband is her third book.

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the conservative movement since the publication of her best-selling 1964 book, A Choice Not An Echo. Author of 20 books, Schlafly has written a monthly newsletter since 1967 called The Phyllis Schlafly Report and a syndicated column, which appears in 100 newspapers. Her daily radio commentaries are heard daily on over 600 stations, and her radio talk show on education called Eagle Forum Live is heard weekly on 90 stations. She lives in St. Louis. 

Product Details

  • File Size: 367 KB
  • Print Length: 245 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1935071270
  • Publisher: WND Books; 1 edition (March 15, 2011)
  • Publication Date: March 15, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004NEW0K2
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #191,092 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

SUZANNE VENKER is an author and Fox News contributor. She tackles a range of social issues surrounding marriage and the family, including the infamous gender wars. Her most recent book is The Two-Income Trap: Why Parents Are Choosing to Stay Home.

Suzanne's previous book, The War on Men, was published on the heels of a Fox article of the same name that went viral in November 2012--landing Suzanne a spot on The View, where she bantered about with Mike Tyson while warding off attacks from Whoopi Goldberg.

In late 2013, Suzanne founded Women for Men, a news and opinion website committed to the needs of boys and men. She is also a trustee at Leading Women for Shared Parenting and is part the commission to establish a White House Council on Boys & Men.

Suzanne has written for various publications, including the New York Post, St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Parents.com, and The Daily Caller. Her TV credits include STOSSEL, The View, Fox & Friends, ABCNews.com, CNN and C-Span. She has appeared on literally hundreds of radio shows throughout the country.

Suzanne and her family live in St. Louis, MO.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

192 of 232 people found the following review helpful By IvyPearl on July 30, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I generally don't write reviews but I must thank the authors for writing this book. It should be interesting to note that I am a liberal black woman who used to consider herself a feminist...that is until I read this book. I found this book based on reviews from another book called Manning Up by Kay S. Hymowitz. I was trying to get to the source of the tension and battles between the sexes. It used to be that these so called battles were nothing more than harmless back and forth words...everyone would shake hands and go home. Nowadays it is going far beyond this harmless chatter into full blown fights where everyone loses. This book sheds light on feminism which may be causing this tension.

From a woman's perspective, I feel like we have all been bamboozled into thinking the career is everything. Fortunately, I've never quite fallen prey to this assumption but I have obsessed over my career a time or two nonetheless. My generation believed that once you graduated college and got a good career then your life would be set. Well, not so fast...most of us never factored the biological clock into this equation. And now I have friends in their 30s and 40s who have to make tough decisions of whether to hurry up and marry any man who wants to have a child or settle for a sperm bank. That's not what feminism was supposed to bring us. This is not what we bargained for when we accepted it. On the other hand, I have co-workers who are rushed to get into the office and rushed to get home to take over the 2nd shift (being a mother!). They're tired and weary and would rather stay home and take care of their family. It's an impossible dream because now their lifestyles are dependent upon a two income household.
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24 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Samantha Bailey on February 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover
I wanted to like this book as I found Suzanne Venker's 7 Myths of Working Mothers to be both informative and insightful. (It did not stop me from being a working mother, but it did help me make peace with my decision to "downshift" my career and move to part-time work, a move that has been personally difficult for me but is what I believe is best for my son and family.)

This book reads as a polemic and lacks nuance. Men are cast as innocent victims who suffer at the hands of women who are greedy, narcissistic, harpies. Further, the authors look back upon the era before the 1960's with extremely rose colored glasses as a time where girls were girls (and therefore completely fulfilled in their roles as wives and mothers) and men were men (and therefore utterly content with their roles as breadwinners). Were that really the case why was the culture so ripe for the changes and upheaval wrought by the 60's "cultural revolution"? Clearly there were a lot of people, both men and women, who were dissatisfied with the status quo and their lot in life. It seems an overly simplistic analysis to conclude that feminism is responsible for pretty much all of the negative changes that have happened in society over the past 40 years, which is the basic premise of the book.

I am very open to arguments that the second wave of feminism had some misguided and harmful outcomes--I think that most women who have felt the longing for a baby (a longing that can be physical, emotional and even spiritual), experienced a ticking "biological clock" and struggled with guilt and/or dissatisfaction when faced with decisions around putting their babies into group care can acknowledge that there are biological realities in our lives that cannot be denied.
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167 of 224 people found the following review helpful By E. Maresca on April 13, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I thoroughly enjoyed this book. As a woman in her late 20's who recently made the transition from career world to domestic life, raising my son, this book is exactly what I needed. People talk about the working mother's guilt, but there is a lot of guilt for those of us with feminism ideology ingrained in our brain who decide their current calling to be their children. When making the decision to quit my job (which I loved and I was good at) I knew, deep down,that I wanted to be a full time mother. I knew from the beginning (in college) that I eventually wanted to be the one raising my children, shaping them into little, respectable members of society. But, when the time came to quit, I felt an incredible amount of pressure to remain at work. Not from my husband, but from society. There is a certain response you get from people when you tell them you are a stay at home mom. It is like, "Oh, good for you." or "Isn't he a lucky boy", which on the surface seem like decent enough responses, but the condescending facial expressions and tone of voice that go along with them are uncomfortable to endure.

This book is written for women, like me, who know it is their duty to take responsibility for the people they bring into this world, but feel they owe it to the world to remain in the workforce because of societal guilt. "We've come so far and made so many advancements. We owe it to ourselves and to the women who came before us to stay at work and continue to build a career." (That was the guilt I had at least). But, what is important that this book points out is no matter how much you think you "owe it to" whomever.... you owe it to your children to give them the best upbringing you can.

So many women say "I wish I could stay home, but I need to work".
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