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The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality Paperback – May 26, 1992


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The Flock: The Autobiography of a Multiple Personality + When Rabbit Howls + The Minds of Billy Milligan
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books; Ballantine Books ed edition (May 26, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0449907325
  • ISBN-13: 978-0449907320
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #135,913 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

This is a fascinating book that we were all proud to publish. It "de-sensationalizes" multiple personality disorder for the reader and explains it clearly through a very compelling and emotionally charged case. Though now eight years old, THE FLOCK continues to sells very well.

One of the aspects that struck most of us when we first read it was that healthy people develop separate personalities on a moderate level: a "work" personality, a "spouse/lover" personality, a "son/daughter" personality, a "parent" personality, and many more. But healthy people don't completely dissassociate because they aren't protecting their souls from the intense kind of suffering experienced by a victim of sexual abuse.

The best books teach us as much about ourselves as the subjects about which they were written.

From the Inside Flap

"This is the first coherent autobiographical study of its kind, and it is absolutely mesmerizing....Simply not be be missed."
THE DETROIT NEWS
When Joan Frances Casey "awoke" on the ledge of a building ready to jump, she did not know how she had gotten there. And it wasn't the first time she had blanked out. She decided to give therapy another try. And after a few sessions, Lynn Wilson, an experienced psychiatric social worker, was shocked to discover that Joan had MPD--Multiple Personality Disorder. And as she came to know Joan's distinct selves, Lynn uncovered a nightmarish pattern of emotional and physical abuse, including rape and incest, that nearly succeeded in smothering the artistic and intellectual gifts of this amazing young woman.

Customer Reviews

It's believeable and very well written.
James Carter
I found this book to be comforting in a way that only people with DID/MPD can understand.
Laura
Thank you Joan Frances for sharing your story so candidly.
Rochelle

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Laura on December 29, 2002
I found this book to be comforting in a way that only people with DID/MPD can understand. Of course no one wants anyone to suffer with such an illness, however when you also suffer from the illness a book with this much sensitivity and courage is amazing. The author never needed to go into graphic detail of her abuse, that made this book safe for me. Her story gave me hope in my journey to recovery. I reccomend this book!!!
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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By James Carter on January 1, 2002
I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to know what it is like to live with MPD. It's believeable and very well written. Many books on MPD are sensational, and extremely graffic. The emphasis is on the abuse events and patterns. This book is about the real life struggle of living with and recieving therapy for MPD. It is written in first person by a Multiple and her therapist. Both parties describe the difficulty in living with and treating MPD very accurately.
It's a book you can reccomend to your friends that won't give them nightmares, but will certainly cause them to think and to learn.
Thankyou Joan Casey and Lynn Wilson
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41 of 46 people found the following review helpful By HouseofGhosts on August 21, 2001
This one's a little different. First, it is written not by the core personality, but by one of her alters. Secondly, the therapist's own notes are interjected through out in an attempt to show you both sides of the story. The main difference, however, comes from the style of therapy Casey and Wilson engage in: serious re-parenting. Personally, it went to such an extreme that I thought it was unhealthy. Yes, I want to trust my own therapist, but I fail to see how becoming a frequent visitor in his house and treating him like a pseudo-father figure would benefit either of us. Boundaries are very, very flimsy here, nearly to the point of co-dependence.
That said, The Flock is a decent read. The story is involving, even if completely impossible for any multiple I know to identify with. No one I know will ever receive such therapy. In fact, I'm not sure that they should.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 12, 1999
Joan Frances Casey managed to account for and explain all twenty-four entities. She provided a clear and coherent picture for those who do not understand or wish to learn about MPD. She also provided a companion to those struggling with their own entities. Many books have tried to document real and fictional MPD cases but failed to really be coherent in accounting for the personalities. This is an excellent book, and one worth reading several times over.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 25, 1998
This book has been criticized (in the MPD community) as being unrealistic in the context of The Flock's treatment (essentially she was reparented). Nonetheless I think it's valuable to read for many reasons. Besides, who wouldn't want to be reparented? (sure seems to work quicker!) The author's choice of de-emphasizing the abuse descriptions (there are no graphic descriptions of abuse in this book) provides us with the rare opportunity to focus on the treatment and the growth of the Flock over time. I also very much appreciated the less than optimal description of the integrated person - Joan Casey needed post-integration therapy to deal with some of your run of the mill issues of self-worth and destructive relationship patterns. (This is very real life! Integration is usually not the END and you live happily ever after. I was very happy to see this discussed and resolved so favorably in the end.)
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 2004
Beautifully told, this well-written and fascinating book is a must for anyone interested in DID or really any of the illnesses that have been confused with that disorder for years. The writing is eloquent, yet the images of this book are striking (something like McCrae's "Bark of the Dogwood," or those in "Sybil.) If you have to choose one book on this illness, choose this one.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By T. Brooks on January 22, 2006
This book was given to me by a friend and in all honesty I expected little from it. I had read Sybil and wasn't all that impressed and expected this to be very similar. I was pleasantly surprised; this book is far more convincing then Sybil. It lets you actually get into the mind of a multiple to see what they're thinking and not only what the main identity is thinking but also the lesser personalities. It also goes over the origins of most of the personalities which provides an absolutely fascinating aspect to learning about MPD.

There are points in this book I sat back astonished at just what this woman could accomplish. At one point she was letting two different personalities write notes with two different hands at one time. How this is even possible is mind boggling to me and that isn't where it ended. There was just so many layers of completely fascinating details going on at all times.

The only complaint I have about it is the way in which it was written. It's somewhat choppy going between the therapists notes and the author's own writing. This would have been OK if it was set up formally (i.e. one therapist note chapter then one author chapter and repeat) but at times it wavered and this made it sometimes a bit confusing. All and all though it's definitely worth looking into especially if you're interested in learning about MPD from the perspective of someone who's been there.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By J. Globe on September 7, 2002
Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this book. I myself a multiple now have words to what we have been feeling and this book really explained and put into words things that we couldn't. I recomend this book for any multiple just be careful because some things are triggering, but it doesn't go into gory details of the abuse. Thank you for this book. I was really saddened at the end though at the loss. (Not any fault of the book)
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