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The Flood: A Novel Paperback – January 1, 1997

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$15.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Ascher (Simone de Beauvoir movingly depicts the ravages of prejudice as witnessed by a nine-year-old Jewish girl in Kansas during the 1950s. Eva Hoffman, her younger sister, Sarah, and their parents, David and Leah, enjoy an upper-middle-class, cultured lifestyle until events disrupt their tranquility. Ground-breaking civil rights legislation (Brown v. the Board of Education raises the issue of mandatory school integration, a situation closely watched by the Hoffmans' black cleaning woman, Mrs. Johnson. Knowing that her parents had to flee Vienna in the '30s, Eva has a special sensitivity to racial injustice. A neighbor's emphatic refusal to adopt a black child also fuels Eva's outrage, but the catalytic incident occurs when the family of a railroad worker stays with the Hoffmans after a flood leaves them homeless. Eva and her parents soon detect the guests' bigotry, and their rising moral indignation threatens to outweigh any sympathy they feel for these refugees. The destructiveness and communicability of racism are cogently demonstrated, yet Eva's precocity strains credibility, and the novel's abrupt conclusion may leave readers dissatisfied.
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

A disastrous spring flood and the coming of integration introduce adult problems into the placid life of a young Kansas girl. At ten, Eva Hoffman has had a textbook-perfect childhood despite her German-Jewish parents' memories of Nazi horrors. Now, as Brown brings suit against the Topeka, Kansas, school district she attends, and floods bring confrontation with refugees whose lives differ widely from hers, Eva must learn to accommodate both the world's ugliness and the altruistic values she has been taught. Ascher writes lucidly and simply about complicated situations and feelings, so much so that the novel might do for a literate young adult reader, though oversimplification of character and a weak ending somewhat mar its impact. Recommended. Shelley Cox, Special Collections, Southern Illinois Univ. Lib., Carbondale
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 184 pages
  • Publisher: Curbstone Books; Curbstone Press ed edition (January 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1880684438
  • ISBN-13: 978-1880684436
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,595,977 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author


I was born in Cleveland, shortly after my parents arrived in the US, and grew up in Topeka, Kansas. Afraid to try to support myself entirely by my writing, I got a doctorate in Anthropology and spent much of my work life in New York City, studying public schools, doing my personal writing in the early mornings, on weekends, and during vacations

Of my six books, my new novel, A Call from Spooner Street, (Mill City, fall 2015), an earlier novel,The Flood (Curbstone, 1996, and Northwest University, 2005) and my memoir, Afterimages (Holmes & Meier, 2008), all explore my those parts of my life that have been indelibly formed by living amidst those who fled the Holocaust.

In addition to scholarly studies of public education, I've published essays in the New York Times, the Hartford Courant, The Nation, and Ms. Magazine. My stories and essays have appeared in ACM, Witness, New Letters, The Kenyon Review, Virginia Quarterly Review, and Shenandoah and Tikkun. I have received awards from the New York Council for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Literature.

These days I live in the country and am happily writing pretty much full-time, which allows me to try out ideas in both fiction and nonfiction.

For more, see carolascher.net

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By PuppyTalk on July 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
I was getting really tired of books on people having affairs, or kids who suffer in broken homes, dysfunctional family, irresponsible parents, etc. when I came across this book. There is no affairs, sexual contents, divorce, or alcoholics/drug addicts in this book, thank goodness, and the protagonist's family is in good accord, even though there are some disagreements and distresses at times. From that perspective, one may call this book unique. It was quite refreshing to read about a functioning family facing external problems and issues which affect them internally.

The protagonist is a 9-yr-old girl, Eva, who is a mature thinker for her age. Her sense of justice and fairness and what is right and wrong is very strong, and she seems to know how to make good argument about moral and racial issues. She often strikes up a discussion about these matters with adults around her, is capable of carrying the discussion at adult level. Yet she's still emotionally a child, and sometimes her weaknesses and childish selfishness show involuntarily.

The Hoffmans have migrated from Vienna, fleeing Hitler's claws and settled in Topeka, KS. The father is a doctor (psychiatrist?), and the mother is a stay-home mama, with a very strong sense of moral and justice. Because of their own experience as Jews, they believe in human equality, and try to practice their belief in their daily life by treating black people, mentally ill people, white flood victims with the same principle, in the midst of white people who are trapped in racism and bigotry, and try to get along. They fled Europe's prejudice to the country of freedom (America), but they find the same prejudice, which is quite disappointing and disheartening. And they fight against it by living what they believe.
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Format: Paperback
A well-told story with captivating characters. The child of German refugees from Nazi Germany must navigate her own way through the social mores of the American heartland in the 1950s. Her mother bends over backward to avoid any show of racism; her father seems to be unaware of the problems roiling around him, Eva, the main character, sees all, and is nearly drowned.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Curbstone Press, Jantje Tielken, Editorial Assistant, October 11, 2001 on August 6, 2001
Format: Paperback
Nine year-old Eva Hoffman is an Austrian refugee whose family has found a precarious safety in Topeka, Kansas in 1951, the year of the landmark desegregation case. As the rising river inundates the town, the Hoffmans open their home to refugees from the flood, and Eva learns the complexities of prejudice-and courage-both within and outside her family.
"A richly evocative story of the awakening to adulthood." -- The Los Angeles Times.
"A refreshing and extremely moving novel." --Ms. Magazine
"Eva is...reminiscent of a Carson McCullers heroine." --The New York Times.
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