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  • The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants
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The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Wild Edible Plants


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  • Winner of the 2006 Midwest Book Award!
  • 218 color photos, demonstrating each edible part in the proper stage of harvest, plus showing important identifying features
  • Step-by-step tutorial to positive plant identification
  • Photos and text comparing potentially confusing plants
  • Thorough discussion on how to gather and use the plants
63 new from $14.26 35 used from $11.47

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Frequently Bought Together

The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants + Nature's Garden: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Edible Wild Plants + A Field Guide to Edible Wild Plants: Eastern and central North America (Peterson Field Guides)
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Product Description

The Forager's Harvest: A Guide to Identifying, Harvesting, and Preparing Wild Edible Plants. The Forager's Harvest has many unique features that will appeal to naturalists, hikers, campers, survivalists, homesteaders, gardeners, chefs, Native Americans, and whole-food enthusiasts. The book contains a calendar of harvest times for wild produce, a step-by-step protocol for positive identification, an illustrated glossary tailored to the needs of foragers, a recommended reading list, plus special sections on conservation, safety, nutrition, harvest techniques, preparation methods, and storage. While The Forager's Harvest is not a regional guide, it will prove most useful to readers in the eastern US and Canada, the Rocky Mountains, and the Pacific Northwest. Sturdy Smythe Sewn Binding.Detailed information on harvest, preparation, and storage techniques.A foraging calendar showing harvest times for wild foods.A glossary of botanical terms illustrated with line drawings.Bibliography and recommended reading list.Fully Indexed for convenience.Author - Samuel Thayer.Binding - Paper - 6"x9".Pages - 368.Publisher - The Forager's Harvest Press.Year - 2006.ISBN - 9780976626602.About the Author - Samuel Thayer - is a natty dresser, he first led nature walks at 19 and besides wild food foraging, Sam is an all-around naturalist with particular interest in reptiles, amphibians, bird watching, botany, and mammals. His passion for wild food extends to studying the origin of cultivated plants and the socio-economic history of the human diet. Other favorite activities include running, bicycling, archery, fishing, cliff diving, body surfing, photography, cooking, growing fruit trees, using scythes and other old hand tools, hunting, and anything with the family..

Product Details

Color: Paperback
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches ; 1.6 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Origin: China
  • ASIN: 0976626608
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (331 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,167 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)


Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

If you're reading this and haven't yet bought this book, go buy it now.
Shak
I also prefer books with good descriptions, lots of photos of each plant to make identification easier, and to cover the plant from identification to the plate.
" Anti Microchip "
This book is great for learning how to forage and harvest foods out in the wild.
O. Altizer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

683 of 685 people found the following review helpful By Washu-chan on December 13, 2006
Color Name: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a botanist and I'm in love with this book. Admittedly, it treats only a few dozen plants, but each is described in detail, with methods of distinguishing it in the field from similar species, harvesting, and preparing it. Numerous color photos are very useful. There are good general discussions of plant identification, harvesting, and preservation. The author complains about previous edible plant references, which exhaustively list hundreds of plants but give inadequate information on each, and frequently recycle information from previous literature, allowing misinformation to creep in (an undeniable problem). Thayer proposes that writers on edible plants should provide only information from their own experience or else specifically referenced information, a praiseworthy code of conduct and one that really makes this book shine. When he gives you detailed instructions for when and how to gather and prepare a plant, you know that he's actually done it himself and it worked. I like his standards for the plants as well: Food should taste good! If it doesn't taste good, he says, don't eat it! So, while other books provide long lists of "survival foods" that would gag a goat, Thayer discusses only the plants that he actually enjoys eating. He tells you what sort of quality to expect in the final products, and whether they will be worth the work you put into them. The only volume I can recall seeing of remotely similar quality was Steve Brill's book, which dealt with a different set of plants (emphasizing the common "weedy" species that Thayer is not particularly interested in), so if you already have Brill, you can buy this too. Otherwise, if you want to start learning to use edible wild plants, start with this volume.
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406 of 411 people found the following review helpful By William Smith on October 19, 2006
Color Name: Paperback
I have 3 books on wild food foraging, including Angier's Wild Edibles and Gibbons Stalking the Wild Asparagus. Both those books are very good for plant details except they rely on hand drawn depictions for the plants, which it makes them close to useless for accurate identification. Forager's Harvest is the BEST book of the three for getting a beginner started. Lots and lots of nice color photographs of the plants. When choosing a book in getting started in foraging, you must have color photographs, there is no substitute.

Forager's Harvest, unlike Gibbons and Angier books, does not overwhelm the reader with large numbers of edible plants, choosing to focus on a lower but still fairly good number of readily found and easily identitified plants for foraging. This increases the reader confidence and starts them off gradually.

If you are starting out in foraging, this is the book you should get. If you are botanist and have no problems identifying plants them Gibbons or Angier books might suit you better. As I am a beginner, I can say that of the three books, Forager's Harvest if the book that I will be using in my plant foraging expeditions. I wish I had gotten this book first.
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234 of 237 people found the following review helpful By Erik M. Smith on February 18, 2007
Color Name: Paperback
This book offers an excellent introducion to the practice of wild plant harvesting. Not only are the plants discussed (in great detail), but the author includes many personal experiences and additional information (the first 75 pages - timing, storage, etc.) - including recomendations on further book resources. The descriptions of the two dozen or so plants are extensive. The book gives information on ID, range, harvesting, and preparation. I live in Washington State, though, and I have only found about 11 of the plant species readily available here (Choke Cherry, Wapato, Butternut(in urban settings), Black Locust, Cattail, Stinging Nettle, Serviceberry, Sumac (Staghorn), Linden (urban ornamental), Burdock, and Thistle). The book is still a wealth of inforomation and a very valuable resource.
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254 of 259 people found the following review helpful By Benjamin Crowell on August 15, 2010
Color Name: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'm giving this book a three-star review as a compromise between its usefulness to me as a Californian (which would result in one star) and what I perceive to be its usefulness to people in the eastern US (which could very easily be five stars). The book's regional orientation should be more clearly disclosed. It can't be detected from the title, front cover, or back cover. Here on amazon, it can't be detected from the product description. For someone buying the book on amazon, the only way to tell that the book is regionally specific is either (a) to use the Look Inside feature and stumble across p. 4, or (b) to sift through the large number of reviews and find the few that point this out. This book does describe a small number of species that are useful food sources in California, but the vast majority of the ones described do not grow here, and it omits some of the most useful species that do grow plentifully here, such as miner's lettuce and wild onions. I wouldn't have any problem with this if the title of the book was "The Forager's Harvest: Wild Food East of the Rockies," or if the product description mentioned that it was so regionally specific. The author's defensive reaction to Dale Adkison's review is that the book can't be all things to all people. That's valid, but people like me are wasting money on this book because there is no easy way to tell that it's specific to one region.
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