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The Forgotten Hero of Gettysburg: A Biography of General George Sears Greene Paperback – January 5, 2005


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: Xlibris, Corp. (January 5, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1413481434
  • ISBN-13: 978-1413481433
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,366,703 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

David W. Palmer resides in his native Upper Darby, Pennsylvania. Graduating from Upper Darby High School, he majored in History and received his Bachelor's degree from Widener University. A life-long interest in American History, Mr. Palmer has been a frequent visitor to Gettysburg over the years and an advocate for preservation of our battlefields and farmlands. This is Mr. Palmer's first book.

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Customer Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Keith S. Miller on November 8, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The author has written about a man who should have more written about him. He not only contributed to the Battle of Gettysburg, but who also used his training as a Civil Engineer on several important projects. Namely, being in charge of building the aqueduct that supplied water to New York City.
I believe the author self-published this book and thus did not have the benefit of a professional to assist him. The sentence structure is bad, making the story a bit hard to follow. Also, the spelling is not correct in a lot of places. This is a real shame because the author spent time and energy to research his subject. But I did like the fact that he included photos, that was a professional touch.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Alabama on January 13, 2006
Format: Hardcover
The skills of George Sears Greene's military engineering and civil engineering are evident in Palmer's biography of "The Forgotten Hero of Gettysburg."

He shows us how the West Point training would serve him and the nation during its growth of economic expansion in the east (railroads, waterworks) and the developing tactical situations that took place in the Civil War.

I learned more about the man, his family, and the battles he fought in. Much of this is due to the many new documents found in private and public collections.

Greene's life story was long overdue to be told (as with those soldiers that fought with him, as Mr. Palmer stated in his preface). I know researchers, scholars and the general public will benefit from it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Joe Junod on July 29, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
GSG is my wife's ancestor and so we were delighted to find this book, and delighted to find all the research the author did. But we were disappointed by the quality of the sentence structure and grammar. This book needed an editor. In addition, too little time is spent on non-Civil War activity - the drama of lost wives, children, his astounding accomplishments as a civil engineer, and the accomplishments of other family members (i.e., Nathanael Greene, among others.) We visited GSG's grave in Warwick, RI, this weekend. (It's hard to find!). GSG lived a long and productive life (1801-1898). RIP
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4 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Michael J. Sopher on January 4, 2006
Format: Paperback
Not surprisingly, this study immediately suggests that Greene alone is the hero of Gettysburg. Formulating that Culp's Hill was the turning point of the battle of Gettysburg, which he considers as the turning point of the war, Palmer ignores the full story of what took place from July 1-3 and it continued the previous scholarship by Fennell, Motts and Balch. In addition, Palmer repetitively labels the fighting on Culp's Hill as "Greene's shining moment." Again, this remained consistent with the author's main thesis of commemorating Greene's achievements at Gettysburg. Understandably, the book focused largely on the military service of George Sears Greene. After all, most biographies of military men do the same.

Palmer commemorates the general with an impressive amount of commentary from fellow officers and soldiers who served under him. As stated earlier, Union generals Daniel Sickles, Alexander Webb, and Dan Butterfield either spoke at Greene's commemoration at Gettysburg or helped secure the boulder from Culp's Hill, which serves as the general's headstone. Because of the popularity and recognition from these well-known Civil War generals, historians and writers such as Palmer tend to summarize Greene's life with their words. His attributes as a father, husband, and engineer go mostly unnoticed. In Forgotten Hero, the author devotes a third of the book to Greene's civilian and family life, but it appears to be merely a stepping-stone to the military section. By doing so, Palmer misses an excellent opportunity of revealing a story full of guts, pain, and triumph, and neglects the strong military past of Greene's ancestors.

The family history of George Sears Greene consumes one full page of Palmer's book.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Marthajane Kirby on January 14, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be especially well-written with so much attention given to minute details. Not an easy task with a long-ago subject! Every battle, every personal experience by Gen. Greene and his family and troops so well documented. It needs to be in every highschool Civil War class either as an elective or required class. Page after page of references which bring the reader right into the events!

Marthajane Kirby, Saranac, Michigan
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