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The Fountain

November 10, 2009 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
3:41
30
2
3:46
30
3
2:52
30
4
4:10
30
5
3:22
30
6
4:01
30
7
3:08
30
8
3:15
30
9
4:11
30
10
4:26

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: November 10, 2009
  • Label: Ocean Rain Records
  • Copyright: 2009 Ocean Rain Records
  • Total Length: 36:52
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B002RVEKHE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #131,722 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

I'd heartily recommend it to anyone.
Pgh Guy
Others seem to like this album, especially new fans who don't seem as familiar with the older material.
Melkor
You wont find anything like the refrain of "Dancing Horses" here, for better or worse.
techmannn

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Michael Arnzen on October 29, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I ordered this CD from the UK because I was eager to hear what the band was up to now. Right when it arrived in the mail, I popped it into my CD player on my daily drive and found myself grinning and even -- laughably (and I shouldn't admit this) -- singing along on the first listen! I don't know what the heck they did differently this time around, but the sound is much more upbeat, a little more raw around the edges, and yet ultimately more uplifting and joyful than these guys have EVER been before.

I typically associate Echo with a sort of sardonic sense of ominous gloom. Ian McCullough is one of the best singers in the world because he can dance on the low notes, and croon on the high. Here he just sounds happy to be alive. The happiness here is not the same we might have gotten with the nostalgic glee of songs like "Parthenon Drive" from the last CD (Siberia); here it sounds like U2 singing halleluja. (In fact, you can hear the U2 influence here prominently in the song structure and the bass lines). And though I am MUCH more into the "dark" EATB, I can tell that they have somehow managed to both keep their sense of irony while also lifting their spirits above the emo sensibilities of their post-punk days (which I long for, but understand are long gone).

The tracks all feel genuine to me. This is not "faux" happiness or a reach into pop for the sake of cashing-in. The band just feels happy where they are. I can tell they've been listening to a wider range of music, because the influences are all in the backboard of the tracks. And I do think they mic'd the cymbals more than ever before: there's a "brightness" to the sound, and a crispness, that I hadn't heard before.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By techmannn on October 27, 2009
Format: Audio CD
The band in the last several years made some surprisingly excellent CD's. 'Siberia' was a personal favorite that I still listen to all of the time though apparently the critics didnt like it because it sounded too retro (whatever). That CD is filled with beautiful tracks and it was also recorded with substantial studio skills. So, I am still grappling what to make of this CD. There's a decidely new and generally upbeat tone to the tracks: everything is played looser.

The singing is notably looser too. I have to say, I still havent got used to that singing style. Looser is OK but doing that also removes some of the drama from a song. You wont find anything like the refrain of "Dancing Horses" here, for better or worse.

My sense is that this is not their best work, but it certainly is worth a listen if you're a fan. Newcomers might want to listen to a "greatest hits" and then work their way to this CD.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By E. Rothrock on November 14, 2009
Format: MP3 Music
On new album "The Fountain", Echo & The Bunnymen have exchanged their crocodile shoes for house slippers. The one-time brilliant, peerless purveyors of the gloom-rock anthem have traded it all in for safe, edgeless pop rock. Which is not to say the new release is without highlights: "Think I Need It Too", "Forgotten Fields", "Proxy" and "Drivetime" are all good songs, the latter being the closest they come to the moody grandeur of old (while still falling well short). Indeed, the entire record is eminently listenable, even pleasurable, and newer fans as well as the unfamiliar may find a lot to like here. The problem, especially for long-time fans, is that the tracks all sound thin, lacking weight both musically and lyrically. Will Sergeant's guitar is far too restrained and, on several tracks, absent completely, while Ian McCulloch's voice has been reduced over the years to barely more than a strangled croak. In and of itself, that's not such a detriment, but his reliance on repeating a single lyric over and over or frequently resorting to la-la-la's is a far cry from the quasi-poetic brilliance of, say, "With A Hip". I won't go so far as to say they've missed the point of their mission, but they've definitely become misshapen.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Richard Hine on November 28, 2009
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Middle-aged musicians who still make records have come to expect a certain reaction from cranky middle-aged music critics. It goes something like this:

"(NAME OF BAND) was so much better back in (YEAR), when they released their influential album (TITLE GOES HERE). But that was (NUMBER) years ago, and listening to their new album, it's hard not to feel sorry that they sound SO DIFFERENT/EXACTLY THE SAME. I just wish they HAD/HADN'T changed and that they weren't SIMPLY GOING THROUGH THE MOTIONS/TRYING SO HARD TO CREATE A NEW SOUND. It's simply impossible for me to listen to this album without thinking of their old songs which affected me differently because I was so young and IMPRESSIONABLE/HIGH/TRYING TO ACT SO MUCH COOLER THAN I ACTUALLY FELT."

Having said all that, ECHO & THE BUNNYMEN sound recognizably themselves and occasionally fresh and different on their new album THE FOUNTAIN. "How can I change when I don't want to?" asks Ian McCulloch on the first single THINK I NEED IT TOO. "I've heard it a thousand times," he intones on follow-up LIFE OF A THOUSAND CRIMES. And maybe we have too. But McCulloch's vocals and Sergeant's guitar playing are as distinctive and pleasing as ever. They're still going strong, and, on the upbeat PROXY, issuing the present-day invitation: "Everybody look at us now."

Old fans (except perhaps the crankiest) won't be disappointed. And for new listeners, if you're not all hung up on those echoes of the past, there's plenty to enjoy, too.
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