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The Friends We Keep: A Woman's Quest for the Soul of Friendship Paperback – July 21, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • Publisher: WaterBrook Press; Original edition (July 21, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1400074398
  • ISBN-13: 978-1400074396
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #457,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Evangelical Christian author Davis (Transparent) has created a sobering yet thoroughly satisfying primer on women's friendships. Davis, vice president of marketing/development for her father, who heads Ravi Zacharias International Ministries, presents a bold and touching view of the whys and wherefores of female relationships. She offers her own friendships as illustrations of the types of friendships women keep. Chapter by chapter, Davis discusses varying roles women adopt; how space between two people is sometimes healthy; when—or if—confrontation is called for; the possibilities of circles of friends and their survival rate; and much more. Readers will find the author's observations distinctive and instructive; they afford women the opportunity to review their own past and present friendships. While Davis's text is thoroughly sound and biblically on track, an overall sad note is woven into her conclusions about women and their ways with one another. (July 21)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

“Friendships take years to cultivate yet can be lost in a matter of minutes. Sarah Zacharias Davis deftly explores the complex terrain of that human bond, explaining why so many of us long to be known and how important it is cultivate at least a few faithful people who will stand beside us the rest of our lives.”
–Julia Duin, religion editor for The Washington Times and author of Quitting Church: Why the Faithful are Fleeing and What to Do About It

“Sarah’s words could not come at a better time. Too many of us have allowed our female friendships to slip on the priority scale and this book is the perfect reminder of the essential, beautifully ordained connection between women. Reading and relishing her words, I recalled with rich nostalgia the formative friendships of my childhood and emerged from the pages with a fresh perspective and heightened appreciation for the special women in my life today. This book reads like the voice of a friend, intimate and true.”
–Kristin Armstrong, contributing editor for Runner’s World magazine and author of four books, including Happily Ever After: Walking with Peace and Courage Through a Year of Divorce and Work in Progress: An Unfinished Woman’s Guide to Grace

The Friends We Keep is a true and tender testimony to the joys and struggles we women experience in our friendships with one another. As I read I found myself nodding in agreement, and sometimes tearing up in remembrance. We don’t always get it right, but we need each other–and there is deep satisfaction to be found in the relationships we forge. I loved Sarah’s book and recommend it to anyone who seeks to know (or find) her truest friends.
–Leigh McLeroy, author of The Beautiful Ache and Treasured

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Customer Reviews

I bought one for a group of friends to read & we enjoyed sharing the book.
CDM
Sarah Zacharias Davis' new book The Friends We Keep: A Woman's Quest For the Soul of Friendship (Waterbrook) is your local bookstore's best kept secret.
Amy E. Sondova
I did not find anything "wrong" or against Scripture, but though it would include more encouragement from a Biblical viewpoint.
Mama of a Dozen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By K. Herbrand on August 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book was about - you guessed it - friends. But not just any friends - women and their friends. Why we need them, how we make them, how we keep them, and even why we lose them.

Each chapter shared some one's story that was relevant to the point that the author was trying to make. A lot of the stories I could relate to, or at the very least, knew someone who would fit in it. She explores a lot of the different sides to friendships, like the different ways we can love a friend, why we might need a particular friend - or why that friend might need us. What we get from a relationship - do we give or take from it? The book ends with how and why we need to be friends with our self.

The chapter I really like was titled "The Lesson of Lucy Van Pelt". I am sure that many of you remember Lucy from the Peanuts comic strip and what we are talking about here is gossip. This is something that I know I am guilty of and it is so easy to fall into gossiping about someone else. We can cover it up by making it look like we are really just "inquiring" because we are worried about someone or we try to cover up our gossip by "sugarcoating" it.

If you're not from the south, it goes something like this: "Since Anne Marie put on all that weight, she just looks poured into those pants. Someone needs to tell her those look terrible, bless her heart." Or, "Poor Donna Jo's husband has been cheating on her with his secretary, though I can't say I'm surprised. Men like women who cook for them, and she was always a dreadful cook, bless her heart." Add the word "little" and you can get away with saying even worse. "Shelby's wedding was sweet. Such a shame it will never last, bless her little heart." You get the idea.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Lynellen Perry VINE VOICE on July 7, 2010
Format: Paperback
While Davis journals her quest to understand friendship among women, she asks a million questions. In the introduction, she says she will explore questions like: How do we love? How do we hurt and bring pain to others? How do we bear another's burdens? What texture do friendships bring to our lives? What about the friend who got away? What do we demand of our friendships? What do friendships require of us? Sounds great, but the book does not deliver on any answers to these questions. Davis analyzes movies, books, TV shows, stories shared by her friends, and a whopping two examples from the Bible. One analysis that stood out to me is how many pages she spends examining the friends in "Sex and the City". These women are hardly positive role models for anything. The back of the book promises that Davis will deliver wisdom for navigating the challenges of friendship like what it means to be safe in a relationship and how to embrace what a friend has to offer. But that kind of practical information is simply absent in the text. I was very disappointed in this book.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tracy Keck on August 18, 2009
Format: Paperback
Friendship can be complicated, can't it? In "The Friends We Keep, A Woman's Quest for the Soul of Friendship," Sarah Zacharias Davis, explores some of the joys and difficulties of friendship. We love our friends and we need our friends, so why then do we get jealous or resentful of them? Broken friendships can often be more painful than even the breakups we've had with boyfriends. Some friendships are broken off suddenly, while others wilt away over time until there's nothing left. These are just some of the topics Davis explores as she attempts to navigate the often murky waters of friendship between women.

I did have some difficulty in reading this book, not because it isn't good - it is, but because it caused me to reflect on friendships I've had and still have. But I'm glad I read it, and I'm sure other women will also give thought to, and freshly appreciate their current friendships, and let go of those that have ended. There is a discussion guide included at the conclusion of the book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Terra Hangen VINE VOICE on August 15, 2009
Format: Paperback
The author, Sarah Zacharias Davis, writes charmingly about women's friendships, and says that friends are there to defend, laugh, comfort, give physical care and even give space to each other as needed, and that friendships also contain shadows.
Jealousy and being snippy can occur, often followed by forgiveness.
Friendships can slip away, and sometimes they are repaired, and sometimes they end. Some friends are only for some steps along the journey, and not for a life time.
The author quotes from my favorite author, C.S. Lewis and his book "The Four Loves", and explores some movies like Beaches and The Big Chill, which makes me want to revisit them.
Davis' book encourages me to look carefully at my friendships, strive to make them nurturing and continuing, and sometimes facing that we need to say goodbye to closeness that was treasured.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Sheila on September 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book put into words so many things I had been thinking about friendships with women. It really explained a lot about why friendships between women are so different and perfectly described many of the challenges I have face in my own personal relationships. I found it very useful in helping me to understand how other women think and why they react the way they do. It also helped me to understand more about myself and how I can better understand my own needs in friendship.
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