The Fruitful Darkness and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $2.17 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by Roadkill Books
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Good overall condition. Book has some heavy notes and underlines. Tight binding. Ships same day or next well protected.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom Paperback – March 15, 2004


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$11.83
$7.67 $0.90
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Frequently Bought Together

The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom + Being with Dying: Cultivating Compassion and Fearlessness in the Presence of Death
Price for both: $26.36

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press; 1st Grove Press Ed edition (March 15, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802140718
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802140715
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 4.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #240,494 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Halifax, an ecologist and anthropologist, encounters Tibetan Buddhist meditators, Mexican shamans and Native American elders in this highly personal odyssey, a lyrical farrago of field notes, reflections and reminiscence marred by New Age ecobabble. Author of Shaman: The Wounded Healer , Halifax believes that deep ecology (which attempts to fuse environmental awareness with spiritual values) ranks with Buddhism and shamanism as a way to understand the interconnectedness of all creation and to regain a view of life as sacred. In rapt prose she recounts her explorations--geographic and mental--from Japanese Zen meditation to hallucinogenic plants, from the Dogon people of Mali to the Mayan rain forest. The terrain she covers may be familiar to spiritual seekers, but it is too fuzzy to be of value to environmentalists.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Halifax, a Zen Buddhist, anthropologist, and author ( Shamanic Voices , Viking, 1991), writes of her experience of psychomental crisis and of her need to reconnect with the earth. She recounts how she found transformation through the virtues of silence, story, and nonduality, among others, with a reverence for ecology, Buddhism, and shamanism playing the largest roles in her transformation. She discovers that generosity is the root "perfection" out of which grow wholesomeness, patience, energy, natural concentration, and wisdom. Recommended for academic and large public libraries.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Ken Fasano on September 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
(and I have read a lot of books!) I am on my second reading, and will soon reread a third time, slowly, taking notes and making my own commentary. Halifax's ability to combine a deep understanding of Buddhism, shamanism, deep ecology, the history of civilization, indigenous cultures is unparalleled - and her understanding is not academic, it has been gained through forty-plus years of experience. This is a book to read slowly, several times, meditating, pondering, and experiencing for oneself what Halifax so profoundly points to.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 22, 2006
Format: Paperback
It is amazing that this book has never been reviewed (2006). I bought the hardback in 1993 and I still consider it one of my most favorite books ever. It is thoughtful and very well written. It gave me a very good introduction to deep ecology and shamanism. I consider it a must read for those interested in the subject.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ger Agrey-thatcher on March 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Joan Halifax is an amazing creature. The official bio reads something like ex-wife of LSD psychotherapist Stanislaf Grof, anthropologist and research assistant to Joseph Campbell, deep ecologist and present roshi of Upaya Zen Center. The real Joan Halifax is a true cosmic dancer, bruja / medicine woman who has mastered the art of weaving whatever physical or etheric garments are necessary for the next grand spiritual adventure (beyond shapeshifting) and omnilinguist fluent in the languages of animals and angels. The Fruitful Darkness is one of the most beautiful, sad and ecstatic travelogues you will ever read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Wesselman on February 19, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
She brings together traditional indigenous wisdom & Buddhism in a unique way. This may be more important in the West, than we otherwise might realize. Each of the Eastern countries had their own indigenous wisdom, the root stock upon which Buddhism was grafted. Rarely has this happened in the West. To the extent that we can learn & meditate on this wisdom—we may just come away with new depths of understanding. And, as she points out in several places, it's all impermanent, changing.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By bookbug on February 17, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Joan Halifax accomplishes the ultimate through this great book -- she transmits Buddhism through the heart.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Robert S. Robbins on March 13, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been fascinated by Shamanism and Zen for a long time but I did not find this book as enlightening as I hoped. My criticism of her philosophy is offered solely in the interest of finding a true solution to our existential crisis. I would argue that you cannot identify with nature, the absolute, or the entire cosmos. You should not find comfort in an expanded sense of identity.

For example, let's say you are working for a non-profit and you really love your job. It gives you a sense of being part of something larger than yourself. Then one day internal politics causes the non-profit to come to you and tell you that you are being let go. Now you are to lose your sense of being part of something larger than yourself. This can be devastating if you invested too much of your ego into the non-profit. I would argue that it is important to be self-contained and realize that you are only a part of a company, a part of nature, or a part of the cosmos. It is false consciousness to identify with the whole. It is simple logic to realize that the part is not identical with the whole. To identify with the whole is a form of spiritual self-aggrandizement.

So when she says, "It is also clear that our identity is not limited to what is wrapped up in our skins." There is some truth to this but you can't submerge the individual into the collective or nature as completely as she suggests.

Another interesting realization, "I know that the psyche yearns to give the world a soul." Unfortunately, the entire book attempts to ensoul the world without seeing this to be a mere fantasy.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search