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The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: The Star of India
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on June 9, 1999
I really enjoyed the Star Of India, it is a nice well paced book with an interesting plot; the return of Moriarity, who did not die at the Falls either. The book has lots of action, rather than those dry old 'locked room' mysteries that so pervade Holmes writings but does not let deduction and thinking fall by the wayside. What I enjoy most about Ms. Bugge's book is her very human characters, starting with the Great Detective himself, too often portrayed as an emotionless know it all. There is an interesting theme underlying the plot as Holmes begins to think how little difference there is between himself and the good Professor. Happily, Mycroft is there to see the danger and warn Watson to keep watch on his friend. It is a nice touch and a surprisingly clever twist on their usual relationship. I heartily recommend this book, it's well worth your time.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on September 28, 1999
My quote is on the jacket copy, but I want to add that I've been reading Holmes pastiches for a long time, have published and commissioned them, and in my opinion, Carole Bugge is one of the handful of authors who deserve to be bracketed with Watson himself. Pastiche is a curiously selfless art, however .. to appreciate Ms. Bugge's astonishing scope as a sensitive, highly poetic writer, one must also read her non-Holmes mystery novel, "Who Killed Blanche DuBois?" about to be published by Berkley Books.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on December 22, 2011
I am a huge Sherlock Holmes fan and have read all of the canon and many pastiches. I have read many of the the books put out in this series and find the quality to vary from excellent to poor. Although I do not object to some supernatural elements as a plot device, I prefer a human cause to be found for the mystery. This book is refreshingly free of vampires or any other hint of the undead. Although I found the ending to be forced, the rest of the mystery was perfectly plausable. I found the philosophical musings of Holmes to be appropriate to the character as I see him. The pace of the novel was its best feature, in my opinion. The characters are in constant motion, and the novel does not seem to drag, as so many pastiches seem to do. I personally would read another Holmes novel by this author.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 11, 2012
Carol Bugge's first novel, a follow up to Arthur Conan Doyle's "The Adventure of the Final Problem," is a lively and brisk adventure story, pitting the world's first consulting detective once again against his arch-nemesis, the villainous Professor Moriarty. While many of the other books in the "Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes" series place the detective against an array of supernatural or bizarre foes, this is a far more traditional take on the character. This is by no means an insult however; Bugge simply allows the characters to do their thing, and the result is a very authentic Doyle pastiche.

Holmes, Watson, and even Mycroft are all at their deductive best in this story, and their battle of wits with the professor is a truly entertaining spectacle to watch. Moriarty himself, as in the Doyle story, is only briefly witnessed, but is all the more menacing for it, and his sinister game of revenge against the detective is both impressive and terrifying.

The adventure here is fast paced and exciting, but Bugge also manages to work in some interesting character development for Holmes and Watson, and a better understanding of the evil genius they face, all within a relatively light novel. All in all, the novel is a terrific first outing, and I look forward to reading more of the author's work.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2001
This is Carole Buggé's first novel-length Sherlock Holmes adventure, having previously written short stories in 'The Game's Afoot' and 'The Resurrected Holmes'.
While this first novel is a good attempt, I was a little disappointed that I found it fairly easy to work out how the story was going to come out, and who was doing what. The story not only features Sherlock Holmes, but his brother Mycroft and his opposite number, Professor Moriarty. With three substantial intellects at work, I really should have been guessing up until the very end.
Another problem is the chess motif adopted in the story. At some points it appears that there is a literal chess game going on, at others that it is a metaphorical chess game. Since it sometimes one and sometimes the other, some of the things that happen make absolutely no sense in terms of the other paradigm.
Having said all that, the portrayal of the characters is good, and the plot line more than passable. I actually suspect that Ms. Buggé wrote the book so that attentive readers could penetrate the plot, which is certainly preferable to those writers who use Holmes' deductive abilities as deus ex machina. Ms. Buggé's second Holmes novel, 'The Haunting of Torre Abbey', is on my shelf of unread books and I will read it in due course. Hopefully some more experience will take the promise of this novel into a mote fully developed book.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on February 26, 1999
All I can add to the other comments is that this book is like meeting an old friend you have not seen in a long time. It's as if no time has passed at all and you are the same old friends, who simply pick-up where you left off. What a delight!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on July 14, 2003
While not the best Holmes pastiche that I've read, The Star of India still deserves an honorable mention. It has its share of suspense and Holme's deductive powers. The language and flow of the story is quite different that that of the original canon, and it could be quite distracting.
I would reccommend giving this a read, although it could use some work. I hope that Ms.Bugge writes more Holmes pastiches, because this one was quite enjoyable.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on November 10, 1998
I just read this book, and I must say that it is highly enjoyable from start to finish. The characters of Holmes and Watson remain intact from the original stories. The action is very fast paced; incidents seem to happen one after the other. What I thought was an outstanding feature was the conflict between good and evil, as in Holmes vs. Moriarty. Moriarty set an evil plan in motion, and it took Holmes to stop it. Overall a great choice!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on September 7, 2013
I am not usually fond of the books in "The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" series because I feel they generally wander too far off canon. But this one is traditional and respectful, and I am happy that I gave it a try.

The gift of two concert tickets from an anonymous source involves Holmes and Watson in a case that starts when the beautiful young woman in a nearby seat leaves her gloves behind, and Holmes picks them up. Soon the two are neck deep in abductions, murders, assassination attempts, stolen jewels, political blackmail, and yet another return of Moriarty from death. Despite all the activity in this book, my overall impression of it is that it is not so much thrilling as gently engaging. Holmes is a bit kinder than normal since his recent return from The Great Hiatus, even going so far as to take an orphan girl temporarily under his wing, and she later returns the favor by saving him (along with Watson) from certain death. Watson manages to become besotted by yet another beautiful woman and apparently her perfume turns his head so badly that he can't keep the good guys straight from the bad guys. The story goes from one dire situation to the next, and by the time it's done, you might not remember exactly what it's supposed to be about. (You may have noticed I'm having a bit of a problem explaining the plot right now!) I imagine it's very difficult to write a full-length Holmes novel when the protagonist is supposed to be so sharp that he normally would be able to wrap up the mystery in just a few pages. (Which is the exact reason that Doyle mostly stuck to short stories!)

As soon as I finished this book, I immediately went to find Buggé's next Holmes book, The Haunting of Torre Abbey.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 29, 1998
The author writes a good story adding another saga to the career of Sherlock Holmes. In this case Moriarty has reappeared having survived the Reichenbach falls. The book moves well and comes to a satisfactory conclusion when Holmes thwarts Moriarty but leaves him to free for another bout of wits. The author would do well to have her future work checked by someone from Britain. She refers to a women's crinoline being worn. These garments were common in the 1860's not the last years of the century which is the period in which the book is set. The prince of Wales is referred to as 'His Majesty', a title reserved for the reigning monarch and the Royal Albert is an odd title for the Royal Albert Hall. These are small, bothersome details; the book can carry them.
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