Kindle Price: $16.00

Save $2.00 (11%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

The Future of History Kindle Edition

3.5 out of 5 stars 4 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$16.00

Length: 190 pages Word Wise: Enabled

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"In the dark world here depicted, we see Lukacs's own bright form, in his irresistibly human prose."—Timothy Snyder, Historically Speaking
(Timothy Snyder Historically Speaking)

"Practicing historians and . . . history buffs will want to read this book."—David Keymer, Library Journal
(David Keymer Library Journal)

"The Future of History deserves a wide audience. Its eloquent advocacy reminds readers of the nature and priorities of the best historical writing, even as it elucidates the undeniable perils of the present decline."—Stanley G. Payne, Historically Speaking
(Stanley G. Payne Historically Speaking)

About the Author

John Lukacs is the author of some thirty books of history, including the acclaimed Five Days in London and, most recently, The Legacy of the Second World War.

Product Details

  • File Size: 268 KB
  • Print Length: 190 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0300169566
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (April 26, 2011)
  • Publication Date: April 26, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004WSO642
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,512,727 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Love it!!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Excellent writing. Pragmatic and well sourced.
Comment 0 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
John Lukacs is an elderly (b. 1924), Hungarian-born, American historian who has written numerous books about Europe during the Second World War, as well as two prior volumes treating the philosophy of history. In this short, somewhat pessimistic, volume (perhaps "long essay" would be a better description), Lukacs criticizes, among other things, the pandering of the historical profession to contemporary intellectual fads. The author's comprehensive learning is everywhere evident as he ranges through nineteenth-century historical and literary works for his illustrations; and the persistent reader will find insights throughout.

Unfortunately Lukacs takes pleasure in presenting his notions in an idiosyncratic style--the privilege of learned old men, perhaps, but not the best way to engage students of history. Below are some sentences that may allow the prospective reader to judge for himself:

"We cannot know much about the future, save projecting what we can see at present: but so much of that will not come about. Some of it will. Foresight is something else than prophecy: foresight depends on a serious, sometimes inspired knowledge and understanding of some things in the past. Through this some of us may know that this or that will not happen; but also that this or that, lo and behold, might." (139-40)

"Anyhow: it is arguable and more rather than less evident that by the beginning of the twenty-first century much of an age that began about five centuries ago has passed. And also that the twentieth was an especially transient century (of course every century is transient in some ways), but the twentieth was, historically thinking and speaking, a short century too, seventy-five years long, from 1914 to 1989, marked by two gigantic world wars (and then the so-called Cold War was but a consequence of the Second). No reason here to argue further what is, or should be, obvious." (161-62)
5 Comments 6 of 16 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
It is a testament to the sad state of American academic publishing that nobody at Yale University Press, supposedly one of the leading academic presses in the United States, had the editorial power, or courage, to prevent this sad bundle of senile ramblings of a once-great historian from being published. Even for someone sympathetic with Professor Lukacs dislike of social history and minority histories, reading through page after page of disjointed thoughts and stale aperçus must be a painful experience. Readers interested in an intellectually challenging handling of the supposed topic of this book should consult the works of Reinhart Koselleck instead, particularly "Futures Past. On the Semantics of Historical Time", "The Practice of Conceptual History. Timing History, Spacing Concepts" and, if you read German, "Vom Sinn und Unsinn der Geschichte".
6 Comments 10 of 47 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in