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The Garden: A Parable Kindle Edition

17 customer reviews

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Length: 210 pages

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Roach, an ordained Buddhist monk, has crafted an enchanting, luminous introduction to the basic tenets of Tibetan Buddhism. The tale begins when a beautiful personification of Wisdom takes a never-named young man to a garden, where she tries to introduce him to life's truest values. Later, having abandoned the beautiful teacher as well as his home in pursuit of fame and career, the now not-so-young man returns to the garden seeking solace from life's wounds, especially the gruesome death of his mother. Through many visits, he fails to find the one he seeks, but on each occasion a different apparition of one of Buddhism's most sacred historical figures appears to teach him a new skill needed for his advance along the path. Highly recommended for all collections offering popular materials in religion.
-James R. Kuhlman, Univ. of North Carolina Lib., Asheville
Copyright 2000 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Roach captures the entire breadth of Tibetan Buddhist teaching in this spare, plain-spoken parable about a man led to a mystical garden by his young lover, a teenager who possesses more than average wisdom. Like many lovers, the youth disappears, and the man begins what looks to be a two-pronged quest: to reunite with "Her" and to comprehend the agonizing death from cancer of his good-hearted mother. Over the course of the book, the seeker returns again and again to the garden. Each time he is met by a Tibetan Buddhist saint, each of whom gives him one of the fundamental lessons of Buddhism and guides him on the path to realization. Some historical and philosophical context for these teachers and teachings Roach covers in "The Garden," and explaining the role of guru yoga, parable and debate, among other themes, in Tibetan Buddhism, would go a long way toward making the book accessible to readers with a budding, or general, interest in Buddhism. Still, launching headlong into the book has its merits. Unfiltered, these Buddhist concepts must settle in on their own and, like the seeker, we are left with a trove of spiritual lessons to test for ourselves. -- From Beliefnet

Product Details

  • File Size: 305 KB
  • Print Length: 210 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 038549789X
  • Publisher: Image; 1st edition (March 25, 2009)
  • Publication Date: March 25, 2009
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B002361KWG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #224,182 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Michael Roach is a fully ordained Buddhist monk who received his geshe (Master of Buddhism) degree from Sera Mey Tibetan Monastery after twenty-two years of study. A teacher of Buddhism since 1981, he is also a scholar of Sanskrit, Tibetan, and Russian, and has translated numerous works.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Bonnie Baptist on February 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
This incredible book was written not only by a learned scholar of Tibetan Buddhism, but by one who has obviously experienced realizations of the path. In this book Geshe Michael provides us with all of the information we need to embark upon the same spiritual journey, and to experience its magical results. If this whets your appetite for more, he also has created a series of correspondence courses which provide even more elucidation of the Buddhist path to enlightenment. (not a money making scheme-these course are free to those who cannot afford them) These are available through the Asian Classics Institute. If you like this book, try also Santidevas "Guide to the Bodhisattvas Way of Life"
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18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Isidro Gordi/amara@bsab.com on February 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
About the Garden. A Parable. This is a breeze of fresh air in the heat of a very complex and stressful world. It is also a very clever way to present the ancient and wise buddhist advices for the modern world. Definitely it is a must for anybody interested in the inner development. The message in it is beyond harmful cultural and historical trappings which unfortunately hide the real religious experience that everybody is thirsting for. Being written by a very special person from our western world that has drunk the essence of the great tibetan buddhist training, definitely it is going to reach our hearts and fill them with the greatest blessings.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Bill Butler on May 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
A "wonderment" is a thing of wonder. And this parable is that. Haven't you ever had the itch to someday ask Jesus or the Buddha everything that you have always wondered about. "Why do bad guys get rich?" "Why are some good guys poor?" "What happens after death?" "Who stuck me with such a horrible mother-in-law and why can't she just blow away?" "Why did I eat the potatoe chips with food poisoning?" "Why did I spell 'potato' with an 'e'?" "How come babies die?" The author was the first Westerner to become a Tibetan Geshe. And this takes twenty years! So he knows his stuff. To answer these questions and others that you may want to ask, you will take many trips into a garden. Buddhas and Buddhist saints will come to you and answer these type of questions. The reader is represented by a man who is searching. Isn't this what we want? This is a beautiful parable. And somewhat spooky at times! At least, that's the way I felt. Imagine sitting on a bench and waiting for some spooky Buddha to arrive to answer your grisly questions. And that's what happens. I will say no more. Buy the book.
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12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Peter Fennessy on April 16, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is classified as fiction, but anyone in search of a story will be generally disappointed. The story line is a mere thread to hold together and sugar coat teachings about Tibetan Buddhism, and like the thread that holds together a necklace, it more or less disappears under the beads of doctrine. But it is teaching very well done. The technique of the "parable" adds an emotional dimension to what might otherwise be a dry subject, holds reader interest and provides the spoonful of sugar to help the medicine go down. In search of personified Wisdom with whom he has fallen in love and of an answer to his mother's suffering, the narrator goes to a secret garden over a period of 20 years and there meets various ancient Buddhist teachers who tell him sometimes in a very detailed way about: meditation and meditation techniques to attain compassion and freedom from negative states of mind, about universal suffering and death, past and future lives and the karmic influence between them, the realms of existence, how imprints from actions create our worlds, how the negative imprints can be overcome and the worlds changed, ethical living, the way of the spiritual warrior, and emptiness. The topics may be very familiar for Buddhists, though it will serve as a mini refresher course. A beginner might want to follow up on the book with something more organized, but will find this a good introduction. Non-Buddhist readers, while more clearly informed of Buddhist beliefs by the story, may not accept many elements of the doctrine, but it is after all a parable which invites metaphorical interpretation and adaptation of the lessons to the world view of the reader. All in all an informative, entertaining and useful book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Cayton on June 2, 2000
Format: Paperback
If you are very lucky you come across only a couple of books like this in your lifetime. Geshe Michael Roach has the "can't put it down" style.
This little book contains massively powerful information disguised in a parable. The definition of kharma within these pages is beautiful.
I cant wait to read it again!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on November 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This parable brought to life some of the meditation techniques that I have studied and read about. The story is so sweet. I was read the first three chapters by a very dear friend as a bedtime story. I just had to have more to see what would happen to the main character and to keep the memory of the bedtime stories alive. I will read this many times and enjoy new aspects of it each time. It is very insightful and is delightful to read. The author is truely gifted.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kaz Long on August 10, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a Catholic. I read this, 6 years ago, when I was 17 and very sick from asthma. This book helped me coupe with my condition and depression. This book does not only teach the basics of Buddhism but also has over tones of basic Christian philosophy. Bought another copy due to giving my copy to another who needed it.
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