Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $5.40 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Pretty good shape, may have small amount of wear around corners and edges of cover.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Gathering of Zion: The Story of the Mormon Trail Paperback – April 1, 1992


See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.55
$7.99 $0.04

Frequently Bought Together

The Gathering of Zion: The Story of the Mormon Trail + Mormon Country (Second Edition) + Beyond the Hundredth Meridian: John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West
Price for all three: $44.97

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 348 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (April 1, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803292139
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803292130
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5.5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #307,392 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"When The Gathering of Zion was first published in 1964, Ray A. Billington wrote, "Wallace Stegner has written the best single volume to appear on the Mormon migration westward. . . . His sensitivity to human beings and his ability to understand the spirit motivating the oft-persecuted Latter Day Saints allow him insights missed by earlier writers. . . . [Stegner draws on] scores of printed and unprinted diaries kept by the Saints, and has used these very personal documents to pinpoint events that take on new meaning when viewed through the eyes of commonplace mortals."—Book Week
(Book Week)

"Even those who have a minimal interest in trails, covered wagons, and the West will find The Gathering of Zion abundantly worth their while; and the Mormons too might profit by meditating upon Mr. Stegner's thoughtful comments on their faith, their society, and their history."—Saturday Review
(Saturday Review)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

It makes for a very sympathetic study of the people and their time.
Carl Robinson
Stegner's Young is volcanic, brilliant, powerful, and even empathetic; a truly Great Man with foibles.
Michael Day
Just don't be misled into thinking this is historically accurate, because it just isn't.
bixodoido

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

102 of 104 people found the following review helpful By Steven S. Berizzi on May 22, 2000
Format: Paperback
REVISED ONLINE REVIEW: Wallace Stegner The Gathering of Zion: The Story of the Mormon Trail (1964, Lincoln, Nebraska: University of Nebraska Press, Bison Books edn., 1992)
Wallace Stegner is one of the United States' most underappreciated men of letters. Born in Iowa, Stegner was raised and spent his youth in North Dakota, Washington, Montana, Utah, and Saskatchewan, and he lived most of his adult life in California. His knowledge of the American west was encylopedic, and he was a prolific writer of stories and novels, such as Angle of Repose, which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1971. But, like Shelby Foote, the bard of the Civil War, Stegner wrote both fiction and nonfiction, and their oeuvre proves that the best popular history is informative, lively, and well written.
In The Gathering of Zion: The Story of the Mormon Trail, Stegner does not ask the reader to accept Mormon theology or social doctrine, only to admire the courage and fortitude of the church's pioneers. After a mob in Carthage, Illinois, killed Mormon Prophet Joseph Smith, several thousand Mormons - as Stegner puts it, a "a whole people - grandparents, parents, children, flocks and herds, household goods and gods" - crossed the continent from Nauvoo, Illinois, to what became Salt Lake City in 1846 and 1847 on foot and in covered wagons under the most difficult conditions. Most of the book is devoted to recounting the travails of the Mormons, always tired, often hungry, and constantly at the mercy of the elements. The logistical requirements of the Mormon migration were staggering.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael Day on July 17, 2007
Format: Paperback
Wallace Stegner is one of America's great writers, and possibly the greatest Western writer. Contrary to some views Stegner IS a historian. His fluid prose and narrative style are reminiscent of the great Steven Ambrose. When Stegner turns his focus to the Mormon Trail the result is an excellent recounting of the Mormon migration west to the Rocky Mountains.

Stegner clearly admired the Mormon Pioneers. His is an unbelieving but sympathetic viewpoint. This is demonstrated most clearly by his treatment of Brigham Young. Stegner's Young is volcanic, brilliant, powerful, and even empathetic; a truly Great Man with foibles.

A bonus of the paperback edition includes prints of Thomas Moran and Frederick Piercy watercolors and engravings showing the Mormon Trail as it was in the 1850s and 1860s. These illustrations start in Nauvoo with the ruins of the Temple, and end in the Salt Lake Valley.

The last chapter of the book is a modern-day (1960's) Pilgrim's guide to the trail. It describes how an auto tourist may visit important points on the path. There is an appendix with bibliographic notes (yes, this is a history), giving the interested reader a way to dig deeper. Of course, a lot of great Mormon literature has been written since the 1960's. Highly recommended are Rough Stone Rolling by Richard Bushman and American Moses by Leanord Arrington. For a 5-star treatment of the Handcart Pioneers read The Price We Paid by Andrew Olsen.

I disagree with other reviewer's comments that Stegner was not a friend of the Mormon Church. He was a great admirer of these people and their accomplishments. One must grant that the unbeliever does not see a miracle in every event. Where the pioneers saw miracles, Stegner sees human strength and fortitude.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Emily on November 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
Being raised Mormon I have been exposed my entire life to the mythical stories of the pioneers. I knew the names and places in the book for the most part, but Stegner brought the people to life. Just because the pioneers had normal human foibles doesn't make their journey and struggles and triumphs less credible. If anything, it makes them more inspiring. If God can work through the hands of these imperfect men, and I believe he did, he can certainly work through me. I wish I would have read this book before I went on Pioneer Trek and saw Martin's Cove, Devil's Gate, and the Sweetwater River.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By J. A. White on December 23, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am surprised to read reviews describing this book as anti-Mormon. Stegner was clearly a great admirer of the pioneers. Although the book doesn't fawn over Smith and Young, it emphasizes Young's strength as a leader. From my perspective, the weakness of the book lies in the focus on somewhat irrelevant details. Complaints about the quality of Stegner's sources are over-stated. True, he does not cite sources for each point made, but the major sources are primary.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Carl Robinson on May 16, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Wallace Stegner is a first rate chronicler of America's West-the area west of the 100th Meridian. This also includes Canada. His childhood was like that of a tumbleweed, he started in Iowa and then bounced around the great states of the West, including Canada's Saskatchewan.

In America, one can't write about the West without discussing two things-the California Gold Rush, and the Mormons. Stegner wrote several books about the Mormons, this is about the most colorful and dashing part of their history, their "trail" or movement from Nauvoo, Illinois to the Salt Lake in Utah.

The central thrust of the book is to lay bare the humanity of the original pioneers, their hopes, fears, and often intense frustrations. It makes for a very sympathetic study of the people and their time.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search