The Gay Divorcee 1934 NR CC

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(56) IMDb 7.6/10
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In one of their best loved, most charming song-and-dance comedies, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers demonstrate just how they became best known as America's greatest dance team.

Starring:
Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers
Runtime:
1 hour 46 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

The Gay Divorcee

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Product Details

Genres Musical, Comedy, Romance
Director Mark Sandrich
Starring Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers
Supporting actors Alice Brady, Edward Everett Horton, Erik Rhodes, Eric Blore, Lillian Miles, Charles Coleman, William Austin, Betty Grable, Norman Ainsley, Jimmy Aubrey, Finis Barton, De Don Blunier, Jack Chefe, Cy Clegg, E.E. Clive, George Davis, Charles Dunbar, Leslie Goodwins
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

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They do not make 'em like this anymore!
Jimmy
A great supporting cast that includes Alice Brady, Edward Everett Horton, Eric Blore, and Erik Rhodes add many laughs to this Mark Sandrich directed screen classic.
Bobby Underwood
And once he grabs her arm and begins to dance with her, we manage to watch one of the great seduction scenes in the movies.
Robert Moore

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 6, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
THE GAY DIVORCE had been perhaps the most important stage musical of Fred Astaire's Broadway career. Though out the 1920s, he had been the lesser half of the most famous dance team in American entertainment: Adele and Fred Astaire. Fred's sister, an enormously gifted comic dancer, had been the center of the act throughout their career, but when she retired to marry English royalty, Fred was placed in the position of needing to reinvent himself and salvage his career. Somewhat unexpectedly, Fred's enormous success in THE GAY DIVORCE established him not just as a comic dancer, but as a romantic one as well. An offer by Hollywood to come and remake the stage success as a film was accepted.
Fred arrived in Hollywood, but his studio, RKO cast him in FLYING TO RIO before beginning THE GAY DIVORCE. Although he was fifth billed and the third billed male, his dance numbers with a contract dancer RKO had just obtained from Warner Brothers, Ginger Rogers, were the hit of the film. Against his wishes, RKO suggested casting Rogers in THE GAY DIVORCE because of their success as a team in FLYING TO RIO. That was what Fred was afraid of: a team. He had just managed to break free from being thought of as the lesser half of Adele and Fred, and he was hesitant about a new partner. But RKO won out and, as they say, history was made.
THE GAY DIVORCE was quickly redubbed THE GAY DIVORCEE (the Hays office objecting that divorces could not be gay but were instead always unhappy affairs, although a divorcee could be). Fred was given nearly complete artistic control of his dance numbers, and instead of the highly choreographed numbers popularized by Busby Berkeley at Warner Brothers, Fred argued for filming his scenes with cameras just barely above ground level, and as close to one shot as was possible.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Bobby Underwood VINE VOICE on September 3, 2005
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers gave everyone something to smile about for a couple of hours during the depression with a special blend of magic that can never be repeated. Their films were sophisticated and charming, elegant and romantic, and most of all, funny. The Gay Divorcee is a gorgeous production from Pandro S. Berman. A fine screenplay from George S. Martin, Dorothy Yost and Edward Kaufman, based on the novel by Dwight Taylor, helped this wonderful film garner 5 Academy Award Nominations, including one for Best Picture.

The chemistry between Astaire and Rogers lights up the screen during their dance numbers, a romantic yet innocent longing to fall in love in each graceful step and touch. A great supporting cast that includes Alice Brady, Edward Everett Horton, Eric Blore, and Erik Rhodes add many laughs to this Mark Sandrich directed screen classic. Cole Porter's, Night and Day, is one of the most popular songs ever recorded. The Continental, a song not in Porter's origional Broadway show, but written for the film, won an Academy Award. The musical adaptation from the stage to film was by Kenneth Webb and the great Samuel Hoffenstein.

The story revolves around Mimi Glossip (Ginger Rogers) and her kooky aunt. Alice Brady is a hoot as Hortense, guiding Mimi through her divorce from geologist husband Cyril (William Austin). Guy Holden (Fred Astaire) can't forget the lovely Mimi after he "rescues" her from a snagged dress but she wants nothing to do with him. He searches all over London for her and finally catches up with her after a car chase and immediately decides they should marry. Mimi endeavors not to let herself be charmed by Guy while her aunt arranges for an attorney to aid in her efforts to free herself.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By L O'connor on July 15, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Fred Astaire plays a dnacer returning to England from a trip abroad. In the Customs shed he meets Ginger Rogers in an embarassing predicament. He tries to find out who she is, but she refuses to tell him, and he spends ages searching London for her until he finally tracks her down and begins to awaken her interest. Ginger goes down to Brighton with her friend dithery much-married Alice Brady, and Astaire and his dithery lawyer friend Edward Everett Horton go in pursuit. Ginger has gone to Brighton to try and obtain a divorce, she intends to spend the night with a professional co-respondent. Somthing Astaire says makes her think he is the co-respondent, which puts her right off him. Fortunately the real co-respondent, a diminutive Italian, turns up ("your wife is safe with Tonetti,he prefer spaghetti") and the mystery is sorted out. But what will happen when Ginger's husband arrives the next morning? will she get her divorce. This is a wonderful film, with a silly but extremley funny plot, and some wonderful dialogue, particularly between Horton and Brady, who somehow manage to end up married to each other, much to their surprise. An absolutely delightful film.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jack Rice on January 5, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
Calling the plot of Gay Divorcee "silly" or "needless" reflects the pedantry of the editorial reviewers, who apparently would rather see Astaire and Rogers in tights and tutu. The plot, in my opinion, is clever and funny. Of course, mistaken identity is an old device, but the measure is how well the characters bring it off, and there are six - six! - characters in Gay Divorcee who do this splendidly. How can we ever forget the immortal line, "Your wife is safe with Tonetti, he prefers spaghetti!" and all the permutations of "Chance is the fools name for fate." Or was it "Chances are fate is foolish"?
Anyway, Nureyev said that Fred Astaire was the greatest dancer in the world, and I think Rogers was his best partner. Gay Divorcee's wonderful art nouveau fantasy set, combined with exquisite costuming - even the ridiculous Tonetti is beautifully attired - and the memorable music, provide a perfect framework for the ballets. And the bright, funny dialogue and perfectly cast characters fill in the intervals.
Perhaps the world created by Astaire and Rogers is a fantasy world, but it's plausable enough for me to believe that somehow it would be possible to dress, to act and, yes, to dance in it myself.
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