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The Girl Who Leapt Through Time Paperback – September 1, 2012


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"Fans of Haruki Murakami will relish this delightful collection. . . . A strange, magical journey."  —Entertainment Weekly on Salmonella Men on Planet Porno


"Iconic" — BookDragon

About the Author

Born in Osaka, Yasutaka Tsutsui is particularly well known for his science fiction. After graduating from Doshisha University, he founded Null, a science-fiction magazine. His short story 'Oo-tasuke' ('Help') won him the recognition and respect of Rampo Edogawa, the father of Japanese mystery writingA". In 1970s Tsutsui began experimenting with a variety of styles, from slapstick to black humour. He is the winner of various awards including Izumi Kyoka Prize, Kawabata Prize and Yomiuri Literary Prize.
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Paperback: 200 pages
  • Publisher: Alma Books (September 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 184688134X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1846881343
  • Product Dimensions: 7.7 x 5 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #390,429 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Unfortunately, this is not a great translation.
R. Pylman
Thinking that I'd read a final chapter where the two protagonist girls came together, I was a little let down that the stores were not connected.
D. Centeno
The book also consists of two stories, although I didn't know it at first.
Julie @Books and Insomnia

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Gryffin on July 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, the anime by Madhouse, is my favorite movie. #1. Finally, they translated the original novel, upon which it's based. That's this book. It's really more of a novella. Fewer than 100 pages. Tsutsui's writing style is elegant and pleasurable to read. But the story is alright. It's not great, at all. Nor is it bad. It's mostly exploration of a time travel concept rather than an actual story. There is no character development. And basically nothing happens. The move is one-thousand times more developed, and I highly, highly recommend it. I cannot say the same for the book, except that it's ok, and that without it my favorite movie would not exist.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. Pylman on August 16, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was introduced to this work by the 2006 anime film, which I loved. I did some research, saw the 1983 and 2010 films, and enjoyed them a great deal as well. So I was excited to see that an English translation of the original novella was available.

Unfortunately, this is not a great translation. The prose ends up sounding like it was written for grade-school readers, and there's very little nuance or character development; none of the joy of playing with the power of time travel that I so enjoyed in the animated movie. It was worth reading, to see the source, but I doubt this is a novella I'll return to again in the future.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Leah F. on September 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a story, I really liked the concept of The Girl Who Leapt Through Time. Keep in mind that this is the *original* story. The first few movies were based on this story, and the anime is a sort of sequel to it. The sentences are a little bit choppy, but this book was translated from Japanese to English, so that's either how Japanese grammar and syntax work, or the translator didn't do the best job.

The characters are developed a little bit at the beginning, but overall I found that the book was more plot-based. It's not exactly a book that you can analyze in-depth, but the story is good overall.

You also get a second story in this book (or at least I did) that is about facing fears. It doesn't go particularly in-depth either, but it's still a good read.

I do recommend at least reading the book if you are at all interested in science fiction. Yasutaka Tsutsui is supposedly very famous in Japan, and this is a good book to use as a jumping point into other Japanese literature.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Brian K. Miller on April 2, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My Japanese wife and both of our sons raved about this story. "Remarkable characters", "exciting plot", "fascinating insight" were bandied about like candy canes at Christmas. Instead I found a somewhat dull story of a high school girl who repeats a day, skips over a few classes, and confuses her friends. Metaphorically this story has far more in common with "Fight Club" than it does with "Groundhog Day" or "Replay". Rather than a science fiction tale about redemption through time leaps the main character comes across as somewhat psychotic and delusional. The ending, intended to wrap everything up in a neat bow, simply reinforces the possibility that none of the story's events were ever real.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Julie @Books and Insomnia on April 1, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I am an anime fan and although I've never seen the film, I was excited to read The Girl Who Leapt Through Time mainly because it was made into an anime movie. And of course, this was my first time reading Japanese literature so that added up to the excitement as well.

For starters, it was a short and quick read. I could've finished it in one day if I didn't have other things to do. The book also consists of two stories, although I didn't know it at first.

The first story, The Girl Who Leapt Through Time, is just your typical time travel story. It's about Kazuko, a third-year middle school student who accidentally acquired the ability to leap through time and space. Although other people would be delighted to discover they have such powers, Kazuko wasn't at all happy with it. She looked for the cause and wanted to get rid of these abilities because she did not want to be different. The plot is very simple and I think the only twist in the story is when Kazuko discovered where and from whom her ability to time travel came from, albeit indirectly. The pace is fast, not boring and I must say it's an okay read. I only wished the author did not make Kazuko and Kazuo's names sound so similar. It's a bit confusing sometimes.

The ending is a bit sad for me. I was looking for more. It was sad that Kazuko did not see that 'person from the future' again and that her memories of him were also erased. I would have wanted them to meet again, maybe when Kazuko's a bit older, you know, so they could be together. Although that's impossible, right? Because they live in different times. *sigh*

In the second story, The Stuff That Nightmares Are Made Of, is where my frustration started. I was like, "why did the story suddenly change?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Centeno on January 15, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I came to read Toki wo Kakeru Shoujo, or as it's officially translated, "The Girl Who Leapt Through Time", after first watching part of the (loose) anime adaptation in class and then viewing the book's film sequel (free on Amazon Prime!). I actually liked the sequel; it had a great storyline and really made you think after viewing it. The main ideas of the original story (or specifically, the original film adaptation from the 1980s) are recapped in this one (the protagonist learns about her mother Kazuko's past), but I want to see the source material.

I know this may seem a little negative, but my studies involve analyzing text for meaning through word choice, sentence structure, etc., so I was happy to read a book that was geared toward a younger audience so I'd just be able to take in the story without much thought. It reads very easily; one reviewer of the book mentioned that its second half was better written (or translated) that the first, but both are extremely simple forms of writing. Was this the work of the translator, or was this written simply for junior high students...?

You may have read that last sentence and thought, "Wait! There's a 'second part'?" The first half of the text is in fact the story of the girl who leapt through time, but the second half is an entirely different story about a girl who explores her fears and tries to learn their origins. Thinking that I'd read a final chapter where the two protagonist girls came together, I was a little let down that the stores were not connected. Other than them both dealing somewhat with time (Kazuko and her time leaping and Masako and learning about her past), these stories are unrelated.
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