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The Girl Who Married an Eagle: A Mystery (Belgian Congo Mystery) Paperback – April 30, 2013


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Product Details

  • Series: Belgian Congo Mystery (Book 4)
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Original edition (April 30, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062203851
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062203854
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,060,308 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

No blood is shed, except in a thwarted hyena attack, in the final book in Myers’ Belgian Congo series, although the possibility of life-threatening danger is ever present. In the months before the Congo gains its independence from Belgium in 1959, young Buakane is pledged to become the twenty-third wife of powerful Chief Eagle, nearly three decades her senior. But the girl, frightened especially by the prospect of being buried alive, as custom dictates, when her husband dies, flees before the ceremony and is rescued by American missionaries who run a boarding school for such runaway child brides. Here Julia Newton, fresh from college in Ohio, finds that both her kind heart and fresh tongue cause problems, distressing particularly the crusty missionary nurse. Former series protagonist Amanda Brown is absent, visiting her Belgian police officer husband across the river, but she’s unlikely to be missed in this romp reminiscent of the novels of Alexander McCall Smith and based on Myers’ own childhood experiences. --Michele Leber

From the Back Cover

Based on actual events in Tamar Myers's life, The Girl Who Married an Eagle is a beautiful addition to her Belgian Congo mystery series

When Julia Elaine Newton, a young, pretty Ohio girl, volunteered to go on a mission to the Belgian Congo, she knew it was going to be a huge change. But she never expected to wind up teaching at an all-girls boarding school that consisted mostly of runaway child brides!

Much to her chagrin, Buakane was born beautiful. If only she'd been ugly, Chief Eagle would not have noticed her. Escaping from an arranged marriage, the scrappy young girl finds her way to Julia Newton and the school. But this time her jilted husband will not be denied. Now it's up to Julia and Buakane to try to save the school as Congolese independence looms and Chief Eagle is set on revenge. With the help of Cripple, Cripple's husband, and even Amanda Brown, these plucky women must learn to save themselves.

Customer Reviews

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Van E Turner
I will look forward to the next book in any of her series.
Ardis A. Olson
A wonderful and heartwarming tale, told very well.
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Sandra Kirkland VINE VOICE on June 12, 2013
Format: Paperback
Julia Newton realizes she may have made a big mistake. An Ohio native and a recent college graduate, she can't imagine anything more exciting and satisfying than serving as a missionary in the Belgian Congo. She goes there to serve in a school set up to protect young girl brides sold to older men who have run away from their fate.

But Africa isn't anything like what Julia expected. The natives don't seem particularly grateful; instead they are quick to let her know that the white man is ugly and has stupid customs. The mission nurse who should have been her friend seems to hate her. The other missionary is much too good looking for a man she'll be seeing every day; a recent widower that she can't help thinking about. He has a precocious daughter who looks at the world with a mixture of intelligence bordering on genius and the naivete of a child.

Buakane is one of the girls the mission is set up to help. Her name meant perfect and her beauty from birth was just that, perfect in every way. Buakane captures the attention of the biggest chief of her people, Chief Eagle. Eagle decides that he must have the beauty of Buakane and that she will become one of his many wives. Buakane is scared, as she regards Eagle as an old man and even worse, when he dies all his wives will be buried alive to accompany him to the afterlife. She runs away during the wedding ceremony and ends up at the mission.

Soon there is strife between the missionaries and the natives. Can the missionaries protect Buakane, or will the tug of war between the two groups set the region ablaze?

Tamar Myers, who grew up in the Congo, has written an engaging mystery that will please mystery readers. The characters are believable yet humorous, and the conflict is set up realistically. The denouement is satisfying and rings true. This book is recommended for mystery readers who like their mysteries light and satisfying in their depiction of other cultures.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By calicocat on May 5, 2013
Format: Paperback
I received this book as part of LibraryThing Early Reviewers. I enjoyed the introduction into the way of life of the people of the Belgian Congo. The culture that was described was well-detailed and very interesting. The story took place right before the Congo became independent. I would have liked to have seen some of the aftermath of that independence written into the story, some of it was told in the aftermath at the end of the book. The characters of Buakane, Clementine, and Cripple were very well-developed and a joy to read about. I was disappointed in the development of the other characters, Julia just seemed superficial and immature and although she was supposed to be a main character, I really felt the story would have been better with her as a minor character. The Reverend Hayes was also not very well developed. I also felt the plot was not developed as well as it could have been. The plot only seemed to touch the surface of events that happened, and bounced between events without developing any plot points with great detail. The life at the girls' school, the situation the child brides found themselves in, or the political situation and the effects of Julia's and Cripple's actions were glossed over. Maybe if the book was longer so the plot could be more developed, would be a suggestion. The book was also advertised as a mystery, which it isn't., and the description on the back of the book does not match the characters or the story.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Margaret M. Steffen on July 30, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
The subtitle of this story promises a mystery. I would not ordinary read such, but other aspects of the bulb enticed me. And the other aspects are well worth one's time. If one wants to understand another culture and if one wants to begin to understand the culture of Protestant missionaries in a foreign land, this is the book to read. We are still reading about the reality of child brides in some places. This book to help bring that fact to its reality for the young girls involved.

Characters have a depth and the main outcome is predictable from the beginning. What the mystery was, I never did discern.
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Format: Paperback
First, the bad news: This is the final book in Tamar Myers's Belgian Congo series. It takes place in 1959, a few months before the country achieved independence.
Now, the good news: It is one of, if not the best of her books. A wonderful story told with wit, humor, interesting characters, respect and understanding. It talks of beauty, sex, warfare, love, racism, laws, oppression, and human relations.
Ohioan Julia Newton, fresh out of college, heard a missionary from Africa speak at her middle-of-the-road Protestant church in Oxford, Ohio, one Sunday morning. "It was a subject that made a lot of people uncomfortable, and since being comfortable was the American Dream, anything negative was to be left at the doorway of the church." Afterwards, she had dinner at her minister's home and heard more about his work. One of his concerns was a school for runaway child brides. Even though she was supposed to begin teaching school in Oxford, Julia decided to become a missionary and teach at the school.
In the Congo, Julia learns about a life style totally different from her own. Not only are the lives of the African workers different, the lives and attitudes of the whites are also very different from hers. From Hank Hayes, a missionary whose late wife built the school, and his almost ten-year-old daughter Clementine, she learns about the African culture. The tribal system, for example, provided for a members survival. She is given a servant, an African woman named Cripple (who has appeared in previous books in the series) who presents the perspective of the Africans towards white people. Her thoughts and comments are often very funny as well as honest and informative.
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More About the Author

Tamar Myers, who is of Mennonite background, is the author of the Pennsylvania Dutch mysteries and the Den of Antiquity series. Born and raised in the Congo, she lives in North Carolina.

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