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The Girl With a Watering Can Hardcover – October 1, 1990


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 8 and up
  • Hardcover
  • Publisher: Chameleon Books (October 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0915829649
  • ISBN-13: 978-0915829644
  • Product Dimensions: 12.1 x 9.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #475,522 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Stepping down from her frame, Renoir's Girl with a Watering Can wreaks havoc on various works of art in the National Gallery's collection. As she steals the hoop from Renoir's Girl with a Hoop and knocks over the fruit in Fantin-Latour's Still Life , among other mischievous acts, the paintings all inexplicably lose their color and are represented as black-and-white drawings--a device that makes the book's action seem static. Though laid out in picture book format, the large amount of text and small typeface may make reading a difficult task. The book's second half perks up as the Girl with a Watering Can repents, returning to all the paintings she's ruined and restoring the pieces. Their color then magically returns, and nicely executed full-color reproductions appear. Though it employs an engaging concept, this first book in a series is a rather negative way to introduce art appreciation. Ages 8-12.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-6-- "Since 1870, the Girl with a Watering Can has been standing quietly in her garden . . . " begins this unique and clever book. There she stands, Renoir's charming child, but not for long. She jumps out of her picture and visits the great masterpieces of art hanging near her in the National Gallery of Art. Each picture is seen first as a coloring-book style outline sketch because the mischievous girl robs each painting of its color: Rousseau's Equatorial Jungle , Manet's Gare Saint-Lazare , Leyster's Self-Portrait , until she goes too far. Visiting Bellini's Saint Jerome Reading , the girl is rescued by a saint after promising to apologize for all the harm done. One by one she returns to each picture--Winslow Homer's Breezing Up , Fantin-Latour's Still Life , and W. H. Brown's Bareback Riders --and the sketches become full -color paintings, richly reproduced. An unusual assortment of mostly 19th-century masterworks have been carefully chosen for their intrinsic interest, or for some serendipitous detail, such as the child's hoop abandoned in the foreground of Turner's Mortlake Terrace. An original and inventive way to open the world of fine art to children, and a book deserving of a featured spot in most collections. --Shirley Wilton, Ocean County College, Toms River, NJ
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This story has captured the hearts of my children and grandchildren for many years. The little girl in the famous Renoir painting 'The Girl With a Watering Can' slips out of the painting she is in to traipse through the National Gallery of Art and cause all sorts of mayhem. Naughty and precocious, the girl starts by stealing the hoop of the girl in the Renoir nearby. She proceeds to several paintings throughout the museum, taking items right out of the paintings and causing the color to drain from the famous works of art. What havoc! The black and white outline illustrations of each of the paintings begin to give the reader some background of the artwork, but it is not until the girl meets St. Jerome in a painting that she begins to feel remorse. She backtracks and makes restitution at each painting to correct her misdeeds, and the paintings spring back to life with their original color restored. Readers in our family, young and old, have been mesmerized by the emotion and drama of the young girl's tale while getting to know several well-loved and famous works of art in the Smithsonian galleries. We have made it a tradition to have the children get to know this story and the paintings well enough so that, when we can journey to D.C. and the National Gallery, they step into the museum feeling as if several of the paintings there are friends with whom we have shared a dramatic adventure, all thanks to the mischievous little 'girl with the watering can!'
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a book I always wanted to own. I chose this book for the price. I knew it would not be in pristine condition, but was a little disappointed that the binding is not as tight as I thought it would be. Since I use it often with my kindergarten class, it will most likely need some repair work soon.

However, it was a good price compared with a brand new copy.
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By M. Barlow on August 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I have always admired the painting by Renoir of the Little Girl with the Watering Can. It hung in my room from childhood and I now have the print of it in my home as I have sorted my parental belongings. This book is a most imaginative tale of the little girl and a fun way to review more interesting works of art with a child. I ran across the notes about the book in my children's librarian file and school teaching. I think it would provide a good writing prompt for creative writing classes to take and create a story based upon another painting.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 15, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I really enjoyed this book when I found it in my children's school library. I've recommended it to many parents. My kids really liked it too and it has changed the way they look at art museums. We're always on the lookout for one of the paintings featured in the book. Unfortunately it's out of print. I think it would make a great gift for kids who haven't yet been turned on to the beauty of old masters!
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 8, 1998
Format: Hardcover
My six year old daughter checked out The Girl With a Watering Can from her school library. What a wonderful introduction to the world of art it was! She sat captivated as I read her the story of the little girl who ran from room to room causing havoc among master works of art. At the same time, she gained exposure to some wonderful works of art, such as Renoir's Girl with a Hoop and Manet's Gare Saint-Lazare. The author has found a most unique and engaging way to introduce children to the world of classic art.
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