Buy Used
$3.41
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for *FREE* super saver shipping. Amazon customer service with delivery tracking. A book that has been read but is in good condition. Very minimal damage to the cover including scuff marks, or very small tears. Binding has minimal wear, and some pages show signs of use. Occasionally these may be former library books. CD may NOT be included!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Girls' Guide to Life: How to Take Charge of the Issues That Affect You Paperback – April, 1997


See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Library Binding
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$4.67 $0.01

The Haunting of Sunshine Girl
"The Haunting of Sunshine Girl"
Discover the new series from Paige McKenzie and Alyssa Sheinmel. Learn more | More in Teen and Young Adult
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Dream A Little Dream
"Dream A Little Dream"
Fans of paranormal romance will love this new novel from Kerstin Gier. Learn more | More in Teen and Young Adult

Product Details

  • Paperback: 147 pages
  • Publisher: Megan Tingley; 1 edition (April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316179523
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316179522
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 0.5 x 11 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,047,058 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Gr. 5-8. The black-and-white photos are fuzzy and the sketches amateurish, but this jumble of poetry, advice, information, and first-person experience is an accessible, refreshingly nonstrident means of introducing young women to feminist issues of today. Self-esteem, political awareness, cultural stereotypes, and sexual harassment are but a few of the matters presented, all of which are fortified with suggestions for actively involving readers in expanding their horizons in school, at work, and at home or helping them learn more about themselves as individuals. Eclectic lists of readings and relevant addresses are featured, and there is a bibliography aimed at adults. Source notes; some fill-in-the-blank sections; a pullout poster. Stephanie Zvirin

From Kirkus Reviews

A fact-packed and thought-provoking information and activity book from Dee, who notes that she grew up with Marlo Thomas's groundbreaking Free to Be You . . . and Me. With her definition of a feminist (a person ``of either gender who believes in equality for both genders''), Dee establishes her notions of the struggle for equality, and provides enthusiastic support for girls in many arenas. Some topics covered: being ``ladylike''; personal safety; assertive behavior in the classroom; sexual harassment; athletics and politics; advertising images of girls and women. The format is inviting, with quizzes, projects, cartoons, poetry, and excerpts from authors--Maya Angelou and Gloria Steinem among them. Extensive source material is appended (notes, lists of organizations, bibliographies) as well as meted out at logical intervals throughout the book. The attractive chapters, numerous black-and-white illustrations and photographs, and abundant information offered with Dee's light touch add up to a pleasing and valuable guide, not necessarily to be overlooked by members of either sex. (index, not seen, chronology, notes) (Nonfiction. 10+) -- Copyright ©1997, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
87%
4 star
10%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
3%
See all 30 customer reviews
Good quotes, cartoons, essays, and timelines.
Carol Weston
The Girls Guide to Life by Catherine Dee contains a plethora of information and anecdotes for young girls and budding teens that are both entertaining and empowering.
E. Smiley
This opened some good dialogue between us so I could share my feelings and experiences with her and let her know that I agreed with the book.
Gloria

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Reardon on November 14, 2001
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is a great work, probably the best of the Century. OK, I'm a guy. But I do have four nieces that are growing up quite well. Better now because of this book. I wish I had a book like this for guys when I was their age. It well explains the complexities in life we adults usually learn the hard way. A more level coverage of such a complex topic I don't think is possible. What politics is, the prejudice girls are subjected to, and many other complex subjects clearly covered. I will always remember the passage about what we think when girls act up in class, that we consider them "bad" girls. But what happens when boys do it? "Boys will be boys," we say. My sister always "acted up" in class and now is a PhD and former NASA Project Scientist, and she still acts up, go figure. My other sister did straight A's in math until someone told her that "boys don't like smart girls," and she went straight to C's. I gave her daughter this book and have seen no sign of that problem arising.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 11, 1999
Format: Paperback
It's magical to witness, over the course of a few years, girls blooming into young women. The spell is broken, however, when we also see sexism consume their self-esteem. Where once they were spunky and imaginative, they become self-conscious and afraid how their ideas will be seen by others. Where once they voiced their opinions, we see them swallowing ideas unvoiced--especially in front of boys. And where once they excelled in math or science, we see them play "dumb" or believe they aren't as smart as "the other gender."
The Girls' Guide to Life reclaims the strength and self-assurance for young women. With a fun, appealing style, The Guide addresses gender issues by providing exercises and activities so girls learn who they are and what their strengths are.... If you have a daughter, or care about a girl you know, share The Girls' Guide to Life with them. You may learn a lot you never knew. You also may be reminded of things you learned the hard way and never thought to share with her. Encourage sons to read it, too, so they'll learn it's all right for women to be strong, to be leaders.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Helynna on February 3, 2002
Format: Paperback
In an interesting and friendly style, the author writes that typical feminine characteristics such as silence in the classroom, insecurity about appearance, and intimidation about sports or science are not the irrevocable fate of being female but simply the result of growing up in a society that maintains a deep-seated bias against girls and women. She uses teen-magazine-style chapters to illuminate these biases: what they are, how to recognize them, and how to change them. Each chapter explores the facts of a particular issue, such as sexism in the media, then personalizes that issue through boxed, multi-cultural, first-person narratives and poetry , comic strips, anecdotes, and quizzes. She provides extensive lists of related books, videos, pamphlets, and organizations that will help give girls their bearings. But one of the book's highlights is it's activist feature, "Things to Do," that shows how to respond with sample letters, organizations to join, and other ways to kick the passive stereotype good-bye.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Catherine on October 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
Let me tell you this book is awesome! I have never felt so empowered! Not only does this book have real experiences and stories, it also unveils many myths about society and gives real ways to correct those myths. This book is for everyone, woman and man, who cares about the ways women are treated in our culture and worldwide. I highly recommend it! (Posted on Girl Scouts of Kentuckiana web site)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Gloria on March 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
When my daughter read the first paragraph (not Chapter 1, just whatever page fell open while I was driving down the street), she immediately said, "Oh, wow, this is good! Well, I had her read it to me and this led to a very interesting conversation that was enlightening for both of us -- for me because I found out what her thoughts were about how girls should act around boys -- for her because she realized that I really had been her age once upon a time and had had similar feelings.
I was pleasantly surprised that she thought it was just fine to share her opinions with boys and not be afraid of what they might think. She said she had hoped they would like and respect her for her opinion but many times that was not what happened and she was considering changing her ways. She thought she was doing it all wrong but the book was confirming her thoughts and she liked that a lot! This opened some good dialogue between us so I could share my feelings and experiences with her and let her know that I agreed with the book. Had it not been for this book, we may not have had that conversation for some time (or maybe not at all), and she may have decided to lean toward being more of a follower than the little leader she seems to be growing into.
An added plus is that, so far, I agree with everything I've read, and when I can say something and she can then read it in a book, that gives more credence to what I've said. Sometimes reading it in a book makes it more real than if a parent says it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca of Amazon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
The Girls' Guide to Life presents inspiring life stories, poems and empowering ideas. The format is fun and encouraging and women of any age will enjoy the quiz, fun facts about women throughout history and creative ideas for changing the world.

The celebratory nature of this book encourages participation. Catherine Dee's writing style is fresh and playful and she has a unique way of explaining life-changing issues like self-esteem and the role it plays in a woman's life.

I struggled with my own self-esteem for over thirty years and had to deal with everything from immature people making fun of my body to cruel sarcasm meant to disempower me. I had friends who were anorexic but I had no idea how serious it was. It wasn't until a guy friend encouraged me to address my self-esteem issues, that I truly started to blossom into who I am today and still I have moments where sentences from the past will arise to haunt me.

This book is essential reading for young girls because it will not only alert them to pertinent issues, it will save them years of heartache from low self-esteem and negative choices, not to mention having to deal with a negative body image due to the media's insistence on displaying unrealistic and enhanced images.

There are helpful topics that have practical applications. Girls can read about how to start a journal and can also find book recommendations like "The Diary of Anne Frank." There are many lists of books that will be of interest to women of all ages.

"The Story of Cinderella" had me laughing out loud and the "Phone Tree" idea is quite brilliant. Catherine Dee has really been paying attention to the main issues girls have to deal with as they "Grow up Female.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


More About the Author

Hi!

Here's a little background on my books.

The first one was The Girls' Guide to Life, published in 1997 and now in its second edition (2005). I love this book because it helps girls develop strong self-esteem, fight sexism in the media, and stand up for themselves in general. When I wrote it, there was a real lack of books to help girls in these areas, and I loved being able to provide that kind of book.

I've also done a series of small books for girls--most notably The Girls' Book of Wisdom--a bunch of cool quotations I put together especially for girls. The other books are The Girls' Book of Friendship (practical advice on making and keeping pals), The Girls' Book of Success and The Girls' Book of Love.

They've won awards and been translated for distribution internationally. Hallmark did a Gold Crown (hard cover) edition of The Girls' Book of Friendship. It cracks me up that this book is just as popular with women of all ages as it is with girls..

My favorite moments these days are when I get an e-mail or letter from a girl telling me that she loved one or the other of the books, or just saying hi. There is nothing better!

I hope you'll visit my web site, www.empowergirls.com. It has a quiz for girls, "quips & tips" for parents, recommended books, etc.

Cheers!

Catherine