Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: The Go-Getter: A Story That Tells You How To Be One
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on December 12, 2004
This one needs to be added to every young business person's essential reading list. Though written in the 1920's, it does not feel dated, and its lessons and examples are still applicable today.

The young character in the book, Bill Peck, has just returned from the war and is determined to get a job with the leading lumber company. He displays confidence, and that's the first lesson in the book. He refuses to take no for an answer when rejected by two of the top executives of the company. He takes his case directly to the founder of the company, who is impressed by his determination. Bill's confidence is demonstrated by the fact that he had his business cards printed before he had even spoken to the company.

The second lesson is execution. Bill doesn't just throw out empty promises, but promptly delivers when turned loose in the field. It does not matter that he has been given an inferior, difficult to sell product. He finds a way to make it irresitible to his customers.

Finally, the company's founder decides to give Bill the final test, asking him to "deliver the blue vase." Bill shows his resourcefulness and refusal to quit in fulfilling this quest.

Though you can knock this book out in just one sitting, its lessons will stay with you throughout your career.
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on September 23, 2004
The Blue Star Navigation Company has a problem. It hasn't been able to find a manager who will stick to his mandate once he is sent overseas and away from immediate supervision. The company needs a "go-getter", but how will it find one?

Along comes Bill Peck, a war veteran who will not take "no" for an answer. He asks for a job, any job. The company relents and gives him a sales job, selling lumber that nobody in their right mind would want. He proves himself worthy by excelling in his sales position despite the odds. He is now ready for the ultimate test.

From this point on, he encounters obstacle upon obstacle. As you read this story, consider at which stage you would give up. The Go-Getter displays just how much one person may accomplish if they decide to go beyond their usual point of giving up.

Do you ever catch yourself saying, "I tried but...", "If only I had more time/money/resources...", "I'm just not good at..."? Read this little treasure and you will discover that in all likelihood you are selling yourself short. You'd be amazed at what you can do, by simply deciding it shall be done.

Larry Hehn, author of Get the Prize: Nine Keys for a Life of Victory
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on February 2, 2001
This used to be mandatory reading for ServiceMaster employees in the 1970s, and I got my copy from a retiring SM manager in the mid-1980s as he was cleaning out his office. This was the time when Tom Peters, fresh off his "Excellence" writings, was descending into his "break all the rules" type of exhuberant speechifying, and before "business process reengineering" hit the scene with Dr. Hammer, in suit and horn-rims from MIT. The Go Getter, by contrast, portrays a simpler, more direct world of business. You want the job? Pass this test.
You only have one arm because the other one was blown off in WWI? Pass the test. No ADA type accomodating here, no "norming" of the test. And the guy does it. He goes on the wild goose-chase treasure hunt and locates the object defined as his goal: the blue vase. All to prove he's fit to represent his new employer in Shanghai.
After hearing about business in China from a Chinese guy who shared our house in grad school, this seems like a good way to qualify for managing things over there. You want some guy spouting off about "seeing the future first" and making up slide shows? Or the relentless one-armed veteran who will stop at nothing to get the job done? If the job is all about moving lumber down rivers to be stacked and processed, doesn't sound too theoretical to me.
So I like this book, and for several years forced summer law student clerks of our firm to read it, to disabuse them of the notion that practicing law is some lazy, sit around and blow air all day type of undertaking. Don't clients want lawyers who are go getters? ServiceMaster did.
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on March 1, 2001
It took me a few times to read the first chapter--I kept saying "huh?" (a weird opening) then finally got into it. Some of the best books start this way!
DON'T QUIT IN DISGRACE ACE, FACE THE VASE!
Greg "failing forward on my way to success" Rebuck
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on March 25, 1998
I give this book a '10' because it is short, in a story format, and has surpassed the test of time. Many "motivational" books are long; too long for someone who is busy and needs information to the point. I read this book in an hour and really felt like I was involved with the main character.
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on February 1, 1999
This book was given to me by the President of a Lumber Company I once worked for. It is what I've patterned my sales technics after... Always going the extra mile. In short... Service above all. I recommend it not only to all sales people, but to anybody who's job it is to service the public. Oh, by the way, the Lumber Company President?... He's my best customer!
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on September 6, 1999
Mr. Peck's attitude is the greatest point he never quits. Young people today need to learn from the attitude of Mr.Peck. This world today is competative and Mr. Peck shows a CAN DO attitude. He demonstrated that one must win the person first to gain there confidence. Easy reading and quick. Excellent book recommend it to everyone!!!
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on June 24, 2013
Maybe this is a true story, (I hope not) but to me it was more like hazing. Why would anyone put another human being through this kind of hell just for a job? Why would anyone do it? I got the point--if you want something badly enough, you do what it takes. But this was just mean spirited. The point of the book was blunted by its inhumanity. Just my opinion, of course.
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on March 5, 2002
If you've read anything by Spencer Johnson or Ken Blanchard and enjoyed their work, you need to read this precursor to the latest rage. This is far superior even if it is a bit dated.
Do you have the blue vase in your life? Are you in the "get it done" club?
Fun, interesting and with enough twists and turns that you will enjoy the quick hour you will spend reading this book. You'll want to let all your colleagues and friends read this (but not your competitors).
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on January 5, 2013
I have to say that most people I know after being sent on the blue vase hunt would’ve done one of two things: 1) Decided that the company is full of a bunch of South ends of North bound donkeys or 2) Went back and pummeled the pinheads. I’ve been involved in challenges in my life that were far more serious than what this book describes, and I have to say all this book highlights is how to be a weasel to get what you want. We have too much of that in the country already. In summary, even though I like most of what Dave Ramsey recommends for reading, on this one I was far from impressed.
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