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The Go-Girl Guide : Surviving Your 20s with Savvy, Soul, and Style Paperback – June 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 340 pages
  • Publisher: Contemporary Books; 1st edition (June 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0809224763
  • ISBN-13: 978-0809224760
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,073,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Julia Bourland is a 20-something freelance writer who has written dozens of articles on women's health, fitness, and lifestyle for such national magazines as Shape, Woman's Day, Conde Nast Women's Sports and Fitness, Parenting, and Rebecca's Garden. Prior to freelancing, she worked as an associate editor at Parenting.


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Customer Reviews

I want to buy this book for every young girl I know that is getting ready to graduate high school.
Nicole D. Sollman
I am finally going through all the dusty stack of books on my bookshelf, and this one was worth the read even in my 30's!
waterbubble
As I started to browse through her book,I decided I would buy three copies one for me and 2 for my friends.
S. Triebel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Gagewyn on November 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
The Go-Girl Guide is an excellent book to turn to in times of emotional what-to-do what-to-do crisis. Why? Because the advice here is specific enough to follow and therefore help you focus on doing something.

As opposed to many self help books which offer general advice, the advice in The Go-Girl Guide is specific and can be acted on now. And you don't have to know where you want to go. The advice for that is on how to try new things and get the most from internships - a kind of career sampler.

For example what I'm most interested in right about now is career. Bourland's discussion of things to think about when you are considering careers is very nicely balanced and includes some good suggestions that wouldn't necessarily just occur to someone in my demographic. For example she advises contacting an older woman in the prospective field and interviewing her about her career. The questions she suggests are wise and include ones dealing with balancing work and family which isn't something the average career orient 20 something woman thinks hard about.

One big flaw with The Go-Girl Guide is the very heavy focus on sex (and the author's tendency to define herself in terms of her present boyfriend). There is so much focus on sex. For example the chapter I liked so much and discussed above is 16 pages long, while the chapter on having an orgasm is 18 pages long. There is also a discussion of one-night-stands and other advice that maybe isn't the best plan for every girl in her 20's. Four of fourteen chapters are dedicated to dating and sex. Advice about boys isn't a bad thing, but the advice isn't coming from the best person. I skimmed over the dating sections, because elsewhere in the book Bourland has a tendency to refer to her present boyfriend WAY TOO MUCH.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Staci on November 14, 2002
Format: Paperback
Society tells us our 20s are filled with fun, freedom and fearlessness...well don't believe everything that you're told! Us twenty-something gals are not advised that life isn't one long party, freedom is expensive and stress is normal. Thank heaven for Julia Bourland's book, "The Go-Girl Guide." Bourland leaves nothing unsolved, she covers every issue from body image to boyfriends with humor and realistic advice. Bourland's honesty about her own mental meltdowns during her 20s make her words credible,
"To every other twenty-something out there, I offer this reassuring bit of reality: despite the lack of evidence from the media, most of us are just as lost, stressed, lonely, angry, envious, confused and neurotic as you."
Our 20s are by no means as glamorous as a music video, but we don't have to be victims of the 20-something blues. Bourland reminds us models are airbrushed, foreign films cast healthier looking woman and you're not a hairy beast if your bikini line doesn't look like the advertisement model's.
If it's money (or lack there of) that makes you want to scream, "The Go-Girl Guide" holds the answers to avoiding credit debt and saving a few pennies. After reading the chapter, "Our Finances and Other Loose Ends," you'll vow never to charge the credits cards that come so conveniently in the mail.
But if it's the job hunt that has you frazzled, have no fear, Bourland's book is here. She puts into perspective the months it takes to apply, the significance of contacts, the act of good resume writing and the emotions of a first interview. When finishing the chapter, "The Job Hunt," even rejection doesn't seem so scary.
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24 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Lisa Gansky on May 18, 2004
Format: Paperback
I liked this book... There is insightful information on finding a job. It made me feel better when I had a hard time finding a job. But some of it got a little blah. I found myself skipping pages out of boredom, which is never a good sign. Sadly, Bourland spends a majority of the book on dating. This is what I ended up skipping a lot of. That said, there are definitely parts that I am sure I will go back and re-read whenever I'm down.
Recommended for those who are recent graduates without a job and/or boyfriend!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 4, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is not the end-all solution to all your problems. But we shouldn't be looking for some book to tell us exactly what to do!!! It was enough for me that Bourland so keenly touches in on all of the insecurities, self-doubts, and puzzlements that I think are so typical of us twenty-somethings. She devotes sections to many facets of life: careers, dating/coupledom, dealing with parents, personal health and well-being, etc. I actually didn't find the career section very helpful, since I am in a science field and going on to grad school -- this book's career section is geared more towards those liberal arts college types, rather than those of us who jumped into a specific field upon entering college or by taking up a vocation like plumbing or electrical technician. The dating/coupledom section is fine; no new radical ideas, but good advice for any women to have accompanying her into the dating game (Bourland only briefly mentions issues that homosexual women might deal with, although from my own uneducated viewpoint, maybe her advice is useful no matter what sex your partner is). The advice on dealing with your parents is great; did you think you were the only one whose parents did not live happily-ever-after when they got all the kids out of the house? And the sections on personal well-being are tailored specifically to this age where we are no longer nympish happy-go-lucky (in retropsect) little teenagers, and yet not quite needing to worry about hot flashes and middle age spread....This book is definitely worth its price based on the way that it is so tailored to the issues of its audience.
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