Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The God Of The Mundane: R... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: A tradition of southern quality and service. All books guaranteed at the Atlanta Book Company. Our mailers are 100% recyclable.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The God Of The Mundane: Reflections on Ordinary Life for Ordinary People Paperback – December 1, 2012

4.7 out of 5 stars 90 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.95
$10.78 $6.93

"Beautiful Uncertainty" by Mandy Hale
New from "The Single Woman" | Check out "Beautiful Uncertainty".
$10.95 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The God Of The Mundane: Reflections on Ordinary Life for Ordinary People
  • +
  • Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World
Total price: $22.16
Buy the selected items together

If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle Edition for FREE. Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 92 pages
  • Publisher: Kalos Press (December 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1937063968
  • ISBN-13: 978-1937063962
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.2 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #432,059 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Matt Redmond was born in Birmingham, AL. He attended Southeastern Bible College and Covenant Theological Seminary, and has served in pastoral ministry in three different congregations. Matt currently works in the banking industry.

Matt and his wife Bethany have three children: Emma, Knox, and Dylan. Matt's writing has been published by the Gospel Coalition and other publications.

Matt began writing The God of the Mundane because he realized that contemporary portrayals of the God of the Bible left little room for a God who was concerned about ordinary things. Building on his conviction that the biblical God was an everyday God, Matt's reflections on this topic coalesced into a nascent collection of essays.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I have a confession to make. I did not expect to enjoy reading The God of the Mundane as much as I did. I have followed Matt Redmond's blog, Echoes and Stars, for a while, as well as his previous blog. I was there to read the posts that were the genesis of this book. Matt is a great writer, and his words prompt the reader to think. However, while part of me agreed with his premise that led to the book, another part of me was fighting it.

In the blog posts and the book, Matt addresses the current movement of radicalism in the church. He makes mention of "rock star" preachers who preach and demand that we must give up everything and move to a remote island somewhere as missionaries in order to show our faithfulness. He warns us that we make Paul the focus of the story rather than the many nameless, ordinary faithful to whom he wrote his letters. Matt questions whether people realize that God can be glorified even in the mundane lives of the majority.

Like Matt, I grew up in the South. I also grew up in an ultra-conservative denomination. The career choices of pastor or missionary were always held in great esteem and also provided proof of one's spiritual maturity. As a little girl, I dreamed of being a missionary. I always stood up or raised my hand when pastors or speakers evoked the call of Isaiah, "Whom shall I send?" I felt the call down to my toes. Every part of me was willing, desirous, of that life no matter the trials that came with it.

When I read those initial blog posts, I admit I bristled. The emphasis on missions only intensified when I entered college ministry, and I had attended many conferences like the ones Matt seemed to be calling out. They had moved me.
Read more ›
2 Comments 48 of 49 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My passion as a pastor (and to a degree as a blogger) is to impress upon my congregation that they matter.

Their lives matter.

Their jobs matter.

Their relationships matter.

All about them matters and it all matters to God.

Matt Redmond has written the book I wish I could have written on the subject.

I might have failed to write it, but I won't fail to promote it.

In the American church we place great importance on the big and the successful..."As I look around the landscape of evangelicalism, the world I find myself in, the mundane escapes notice. The ordinary is given lip-service, but overlooked like the garnish on a steak dinner. What the evangelical church really wants is something as large as God Himself, whether personality or performance, workers or windfalls."

After confessing that he used to preach to fit this model, Matt writes the following;

"Really? Is this the normal Christian life? Is God sitting around waiting for each and every believer to do something monumental? Is this the warp and woof of the New Testament? Are the lifestyles of the Apostles the standard for the persons in the pew? Are the first-century believers the standard? Is this our God? In the economy of God, do only the times when we are doing something life-changing have any spiritual cache with Him? Does He look over the mundane work of the housewife only to see the missions trip she may go on? So, I wondered. I wondered about the great majority I have known and know. The great majority living fairly ordinary lives. Is there a God, for instance, for those who are not changing anything but diapers?
Read more ›
Comment 26 of 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Read this book unless you are a famous megachurch pastor, an NFL superstar, or a Wall Street mover and shaker. This book was written for the rest of us. I am one of those "everyone else" folks. I have never written a review before and even hesitated in doing so because I am no one special. But wait! That is what The God of the Mundane is all about.

Years ago, I read The Practice of the Presence of God by Brother Lawrence. This 17th century monk coined the phrase "the God of the pots and pans." This "nothing special" friar penned his thoughts about serving God in his day-to-day activities in the kitchen of a French monastery. Interestingly, the words of this "not so special" kitchen monastic have survived while most of us have forgotten who the movers and shakers were in that region and time. Matt Redmond is the Brother Lawrence of our day.

Most of us live out quiet lives, tending to our families, loving our neighbors, volunteering in our churches and schools. Some of us are stuck in boring jobs but are grateful because these jobs put bread on the table. Some of us have lost jobs and are struggling to make ends meet. Then, we go to church and are told we need to be "radical." We are encouraged to be like the Apostle Paul, William Wilberforce or Martin Luther, causing a revolution and changing our world. Then, we walk away, feeling that we have somehow failed God.

Matt makes the important point that Paul was writing to the church, most of whom were not making missionary journeys or writing the great theological works of the day. The nascent Christian faith grew because average people faithfully lived their lives as servants, slaves, tradesmen or shepherds. Jesus himself chose the fisherman to be His disciples, not Roman senators.
Read more ›
5 Comments 14 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The God Of The Mundane: Reflections on Ordinary Life for Ordinary People
This item: The God Of The Mundane: Reflections on Ordinary Life for Ordinary People
Price: $10.95
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?